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Thursday, March 20, 2008

Voxonomics 1-1

Here's the first experiment in Voxonomics... although apparently not in podcasting per se. For a variety of reasons, the RSS feed I created doesn't appear to be validating. I'm not sure I'm going to do this every week or not, we'll have to see if it's of any interest first.

2 Comments:

Blogger David of One March 02, 2013 3:28 PM  

Cool! Thanks again to Nate for reminding me of the numerous resources Vox has put on his blog.

Thank You Vox. I know I'm on a pretty good path for some additional outside study. This podcast was especially interesting considering is it now 3/2/2013. Dave

Blogger David March 11, 2014 9:37 AM  

I adhere to Bob's elucidation of Elliott's Wave Principle as a template for understanding the larger world, but Bob suffers the same problem as everyone else in the "forecasting" space.

As discussed in Charles Hugh Smith's breakthrough commentary on "Certainty, Complex Systems & Unintended Consequences," certainty is more persuasive than hedged hesitancy.
http://www.oftwominds.com/blogfeb14/certainty2-14.html

What Bob and others offer is too much certainty, which feeds susceptible persons' confirmation biases and leads to acting imprudently.

I speak from experience on this. Socionomics and Bob's top-line viewpoint offers much insight, but just as Mises irrefutably explained why socialism doomed any society that adopted it in 1922, theory did not gain traction on reality until a lifetime later (and socialism still infects societies like a virulent ideological Treponema pallidum.)

The collective is too complex a system to reliably obey any current theoretical template, including the Wave Principle. We know when we are "high," but we don't know how high is "up," and we don't know the answer to the most important question of all: when?

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