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Monday, June 04, 2012

WND column

Sudden Vaccine Death Syndrome

Vaccine advocates – although propagandists would be a more accurate term – often correctly claim that there is no scientific evidence proving that vaccines have ever killed anyone or caused autism. Therefore, they claim vaccines can be considered the cause of nothing but a cure for cancer, an end to war and the elimination of all human disease except that caused by dirty, unvaccinated children who are homeschooled by religious bigots. To even consider the mere possibility of questioning the intrinsic and perfect goodness of vaccines, any vaccine given for any reason, is to be not only anti-science, but personally responsible for murdering anyone who died of a disease that would have been prevented by vaccination.

Lest you think I’m exaggerating, please note that there is a site called “The Jenny McCarthy Bodycount,” which claims that the blonde actress is responsible for 888 deaths since June 3, 2007, which makes her the second most lethal American after Chuck Norris.

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50 Comments:

Anonymous AlekJamesHidell June 04, 2012 3:33 AM  

Just wait until they figure out where "AIDS" came from and remember the SV-40 Polio thingy..
Considering these type of things, and the outright Colonial theft by the Bankstas, no wonder TPTB are building a Police State..

Anonymous Difster June 04, 2012 4:00 AM  

I'm happy to report that my friend, who's wife just had twins has in fact been looking in to vaccination issues and he's not going to simply accept what they tell him his babies need. Now, they were born quite early so it will actually be a while before they can get their vaccines anyway. One of the twins has had to fight pretty hard for his life but he's starting to pull through (prayers appreciated there).

My conversation with my friend brings up something that could help narrow the focus here. You'll need to check with a doctor to verify this but, his babies won't start getting vaccines until they are "developmentally" older. Meaning that their actual ages don't matter. If baby is born 4 weeks early and would normally get vaccination x at 8 weeks, he won't get it until 12 weeks.

If you could coordinate premature births to the data you've already got it might provide some additional insights.

Anonymous Randall June 04, 2012 7:08 AM  

In the first set of graphs that sit side-by-side as a single image in your WND column, over half of the second graph sits under the ad column on the right. This is on Windows XP Pro using Firefox 12.0 on a standard (not widescreen) monitor.

Anonymous Rosalys June 04, 2012 7:34 AM  

My own children were vaccinated "on schedule" (30 years ago) with no ill effect, but the number of vaccinations available were fewer then. I didn't know any better back then and in those days I thought doctors really did know everything. Today I would still vaccinate, but perhaps not so early and then spread it out a little. Injecting all that foreign stuff into a tiny body is statistically going to have an ill effect on at least some. (My first flu shot several years ago wiped me out for a few days!) Actually, the population that is not vaccinated is protected by the population that is, at least in theory, as the number of available "friendly" hosts out there is greatly diminished.

Blogger Nate June 04, 2012 8:42 AM  

Rosalys
You're making all manner of assumptions... first and foremost... that Vaccines actually work... and second.. that the effects are permanent.

There are mountains of evidence to show that the latter is false, and there is virtually no evidence to suggest that the former is true.

Anonymous Wendy June 04, 2012 8:48 AM  

How is it that proponents of the current vaccine schedule always allude to the worse case scenario with a disease and make it sound probable, yet poo-poo serious side effects from the vaccines? It's rather inconsistent.

Blogger Scott June 04, 2012 9:14 AM  

That experiment you described towards the end was an excellent suggestion.

Blogger Professor Hale June 04, 2012 9:29 AM  

888? Not even it eh same league as Rachel Carson.

Anonymous pdimov June 04, 2012 11:47 AM  

Of possible interest: http://www.nature.com/news/2010/101208/full/468743a.html

Linked from: http://pipeline.corante.com/archives/2012/05/29/luc_montagnier_is_not_losing_it_luc_montagnier_has_lost_it.php

I wonder what came of it.

Anonymous Noah B. June 04, 2012 11:50 AM  

The average doctor I've met remembers little or nothing of biochemistry. They get their information about drugs they administer comes from drug reps, studies funded by Big Pharma, and the government.

Even if one adheres to the scientific method, that is not the method employed by most doctors. It's more like monkey-see, monkey-do. Not only is the current vaccine schedule questionable, so is the use of most other drugs prescribed by doctors in the US today. Today's miracle cure is tomorrow's class action lawsuit.

Blogger Aeoli Pera June 04, 2012 12:03 PM  

Vox,

Because your first pair of graphs is the most striking part of your column, I believe it is appropriate to finely tune them in two ways:

1. Create a third chart for the rate "deaths per vaccine," which will showcase the spike at <6 months and the remarkable drop in death rate between the ages of 1 and 18.

2. Remove the lines connecting the dots. The lines imply a continuous variable, even for people who should know better. A bar chart is a more appropriate representation.

Blogger Aeoli Pera June 04, 2012 12:13 PM  

Scott,

You have good taste in ideas. Because this is political, we could theoretically expect a lot of volunteers among parents who are convinced of their own opinions.

Aside from corporate interference, this experiment could be a reality. But corporate interference is unfortunately the majority stakeholder in public opinion.

Blogger Nate June 04, 2012 12:20 PM  

"The average doctor I've met remembers little or nothing of biochemistry. They get their information about drugs they administer comes from drug reps, studies funded by Big Pharma, and the government."

BAHAHHAH

Go to medical school... then we'll talk about how much they know and don't know.

You have no idea what studying even is.

Blogger Nate June 04, 2012 12:23 PM  

The trouble with the experiment is... it would be almost impossible to make it double-blind.

All the kids would have to get double the shots... and it would be obvious they were getting saline when they had no fever spike or grouchiness after the saline injections.

its a lot harder to pull off a study like this than it looks at first glance.

Anonymous Mrs. Pilgrim June 04, 2012 12:23 PM  

How is it that proponents of the current vaccine schedule always allude to the worse case scenario with a disease and make it sound probable, yet poo-poo serious side effects from the vaccines?

Like when Gardasil was first manda--er, made available. I never heard so much rape hysteria as from the people insisting that all girls must have it.

Anonymous Mrs. Pilgrim June 04, 2012 12:29 PM  

Noah, you have to keep in mind that Nate feels compelled to defend doctors because Not All Doctors Are Like That. He's not biased in the slightest, not even because his wife is a doctor who is Not Like That.

*srsface*

Blogger Joshua_D June 04, 2012 12:55 PM  

I'm convinced that most doctors today have a WikiDoc they use to determine treatment. I think the nurse comes in, takes you blood pressure, heart rate, and asks you about your symptoms, and then goes out and plugs your answers into the WikiDoc.

WikiDoc then returns the most probable illness related to your symptoms. This process is assisted by the fact that some steroid or antibiotic is prescribed for almost 95% of illnesses.

Then the Doc comes in, and asks you to tell him your symptoms ... again. Then he nods, and looks over your chart, and decides to prescribe the recommended drug and does suggested by WikiDoc.

Easy, peasy, one, two threesy!

Of course, if WikiDoc doesn't recognize the symptoms, you get a referral to a specialist who pays for a premium account to use WikiDoc Pro. ;)

Anonymous VD June 04, 2012 1:22 PM  

WikiDoc then returns the most probable illness related to your symptoms. This process is assisted by the fact that some steroid or antibiotic is prescribed for almost 95% of illnesses.

I've watched House before. Diagnosing the 5% is simple. It's sarcoidosis. Put them on steroids and they'll be fine in no time.

Blogger Joshua_D June 04, 2012 1:46 PM  

I've watched House before. Diagnosing the 5% is simple. It's sarcoidosis. Put them on steroids and they'll be fine in no time.

Note to self: Add conditional statement to cover "sarcoidosis."

...


Dear friends, I'd like to give you the first shot at claiming your stake in a revolutionary new medical treatment tool - WikiDoc™.

WikiDoc™ will revolutionize the way we practice medicine.

It is revolutionary.

Imagine if treating illness was as easy as creating an account, entering your symptoms and printing out your own personalized prescription! Well, it can be.

With WikiDoc™ and it's sister service WikiScript™, healing is only a click away!

Blogger Nate June 04, 2012 1:50 PM  

"Noah, you have to keep in mind that Nate feels compelled to defend doctors because Not All Doctors Are Like That. He's not biased in the slightest, not even because his wife is a doctor who is Not Like That."

Actually what you're apparently unaware of... is the insecurity of PhD's. They very much like to feign superiority of their academic credentials.

I helped my wife study bio-chem in medical school... along with several other classmates and friends. I'm quite familiar with the material. Additionally... I just happen to have a couple of very good friends who are also PhDs.. one in chemistry and one in biology. And I have a couple of friends who were in residency with my wife that were PhD's before they went to medical school.

So its a pretty broad spectrum I formulate the opinion from.

Think Mrs Pilgrim... do you suppose someone with a PhD in something related to law studies at a university learned anything close to the detail you learned it at law school?

Of course they didn't.

Anonymous James Dixon June 04, 2012 2:05 PM  

> My own children were vaccinated "on schedule" (30 years ago) with no ill effect...

It's my understanding (backed up by my memory of same), that the vaccination schedule from 30 years ago bears little resemblance to the one they use today.

Anonymous Josh June 04, 2012 2:34 PM  

WikiDoc then returns the most probable illness related to your symptoms. This process is assisted by the fact that some steroid or antibiotic is prescribed for almost 95% of illnesses.

actually, if you look up your symptoms on web md, no matter what they are, the website will tell you that you have cancer...

Anonymous ThirdMonkey June 04, 2012 2:46 PM  

The worst fight we ever had in our marriage was when my wife was "crazy" pregnant with our firstborn. She may have been "crazy," but dang it, she was right. After a lot of research, and some common sense (why do babies need a hepB vaccine?), we have opted out of most of the vaccines, and the few we allow are given "late" and staggered out. So far, three healthy, smart kids. A lot of that has to do with lack of exposure to day-care and government schools, too.

Anonymous ThirdMonkey June 04, 2012 2:52 PM  

We used to high-five every time they made a diagnosis of sarcoidosis, scleroderma, or Sjogren's syndrome on House. Should've turned it into a drinking and/or stripping game. There's alway's reruns, but one could always be accused of cheating.

Anonymous Noah B. June 04, 2012 3:21 PM  

@Nate

My mother is a doctor of internal medicine, and I am continually amazed by the depths of her medical knowledge. Nevertheless, she, like every other doctor I know, knows next to nothing about the mechanistic bases for the drugs she prescribes. They are essentially trusting that the people who developed and tested these drugs know what they're doing and are well intentioned, which is quite often not the case.

Blogger Galt-in-Da-Box June 04, 2012 4:04 PM  

"Today's miracle cure is tomorrow's class action lawsuit."

Only until KhazarCare becomes the law of the land - with an (R) behind the President's name instead of a (D) - and Dr. FULSOBureaucrat is automatically exhonorated for pushing the Big Pharma Corp. dope Der Schtaat told him to push & private medical care is either outrageously expensive or illegal.
Thus, another GeOPapist-neocon wet dream fulfilled: The ability to kill off all dissent under the guise of cure, without responsibility or legal recourse - at a handsome, gov't guaranteed profit also!

Blogger LP 999/Eliza June 04, 2012 4:23 PM  

Great op-ed. People need to see the graphs and make the connection to what is killing or harming newborns and toddlers.

@ Noah

I hope to be wrong but working in the pharma industry reflects certain medical skoolz were turned over to the drug companies that taught future MD's that problems are solved with more medications, anti-bio's and vax's. In my training, I had to seek non-traditional means of information from old skool doctors that didn't buy into the modern medical scene.

Moving on. Nate's wife is a doc, I'd trust her or Nate over the triage nurse at my local ER.

Semi OT: WikiDoc™ is helpful but would it allow for a print out of a script or ordering bloodwork from a drive-by blood panel office? A growing industry around here with the aging boomers are drive-thru lab work.

Ideally, America should halt barring scheduled drugs from sale. Leave the schedule one and two drugs where they are (even though that war on drugs/prescription drugs is an epic failure) but release the schedule 3, 4 and 5 generics. It would help people who cannot afford these endless visits to renew these mostly harmless medications when taken properly. (Being anti-medicine, I have to lessen my extremist rules about 'never taking anything', sometimes, medicine is needed - obvious MPAI statement of the week.)

My concern about WikiDoc™ is the EHR that the globalists are pushing. EHR's have their pros and cons. But that is another bag of crazy.

Anonymous rho June 04, 2012 5:58 PM  

Vox's comparison to Jenny McCarthy's body count to vaccines' body count is valuable, but in the end neither analysis has much bearing on reality.

Jenny racks up 888 deaths over 5 years. Vaccines rack up... I don't know how many. Does the first VAERS chart say that 100,000 children died from vaccine related deaths? I don't think so, it seems that that's the number of reactions reported.

The next chart seems to say that says 2750+ children died from vaccines. This doesn't give a time frame, so I'm assuming a one-year analysis of data. Let's round that up to 3000.

We can assume that the number of babies born in the US is 4,000,000, also for convenience. That's a very small percentage, whichever number you choose to use as a dividend to calculate dead babies.

I ran broadly similar numbers and had my child vaccinated at 2 months as recommended by my pediatrician. So far, she seems fine.

A friend's father was a polio survivor. At it's peak, polio affected 58,000 of 157,000,000.

All of these percentages are vanishingly small. Would you gamble almost nothing to gain practically nothing? I've made worse bets starting up a chainsaw to trim shrubs.

(Postscript: all of these numbers are what I gleaned out of the articles I read. I'm interested to hear if my numbers are wrong; but to be fair, they're not exactly made clear.)

Anonymous Randall June 04, 2012 6:00 PM  

The display problem that I reported at 7:08am has been fixed.

Anonymous Noah B. June 04, 2012 6:28 PM  

"All of these percentages are vanishingly small. Would you gamble almost nothing to gain practically nothing? I've made worse bets starting up a chainsaw to trim shrubs."

Indeed, it is important to realistically assess risks. However, there is a greater danger here than the vaccines themselves, and that is the attitude that the government-sanctioned experts cannot be questioned and that people must simply do as they're told, and anyone who refuses to comply is a crazy person who should face the force of government. In that respect, this is much like the AGW debate, homeschooling, food choice, or many issues.

Anonymous tabasco June 04, 2012 6:39 PM  

When I arrived at Ft. Benning in the late '80s for b.t. we were given several vaccines.For the next few days we had what seemed to be the 'mother of all hangovers'. Our urine and feces was black and smelly. I now know it was blood. About two dozen were sent to the base hospital for awhile. One recruit had to be airlifted eslewhere as his liver failed. The medics said,"This is common. Nothing to worry about". If that happens to young men in their prime,why in the world are we megadosing children??? Remember Matthew 18:6-7!

Anonymous rho June 04, 2012 6:53 PM  

"Indeed, it is important to realistically assess risks. However, there is a greater danger here than the vaccines themselves, and that is the attitude that the government-sanctioned experts cannot be questioned and that people must simply do as they're told, and anyone who refuses to comply is a crazy person who should face the force of government. In that respect, this is much like the AGW debate, homeschooling, food choice, or many issues."

1. The government sanctioned experts can be questioned.

2. The government isn't forcing you to vaccinate. I believe most government schools require vaccinations, but you aren't required to attend them. The homeschooling movement is well established.

Blogger Markku June 04, 2012 7:02 PM  

This is common. Nothing to worry about

The official Finnish vaccination info lists fever of 39C for babies (102.2F) as one of the expected consequences of vaccination, that shouldn't cause any concern.

Anonymous rho June 04, 2012 7:27 PM  

"The official Finnish vaccination info lists fever of 39C for babies (102.2F) as one of the expected consequences of vaccination, that shouldn't cause any concern."

I don't recall the number I was given, but it was a lot less scary than 102F.

The discrepancy could be accounted for by measuring techniques. Is there an official Finnish thermometer that you have to use? I've not studied the matter, but I can easily imagine that a temple, or an anal, or an infrared, or and armpit measurement will produce different numbers.

Blogger Markku June 04, 2012 7:36 PM  

The discrepancy could be accounted for by measuring techniques.

The official recommendation seems to be anal measurement for under 2 years (unless you have special equipment for ear measurement) and armpit for over 2 years. So, the 102.2F figure would be with anal mearurement.

Blogger Markku June 04, 2012 7:51 PM  

Generally, with armpit measurement, anything up to 42C (107.6F) is considered to be of little concern for children and adults (but probably not babies). Above that is danger zone.

Anonymous Dr. Idle Spectator, Johns Hopkins June 04, 2012 8:13 PM  

Just wait until they figure out where "AIDS" came from and remember the SV-40 Polio thingy..

Some doctors suspected the smallpox vaccine. Highly, highly doubtful now with the newest epidemiological and phylogenetic data. We can trace the common ancestor of HIV from when it jumped as SIV back to between 1873 and 1933. The polio vaccine was developed in 1952, and released to the general public in 1955.


Today's miracle cure is tomorrow's class action lawsuit.

Remember the drug Vioxx (also called Rofecoxib) from Merck in 1999? A Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 inhibitor (COX-2 inhibitor) drug with 24-hour pain relief for arthritis. Unfortunately it kinda had the nasty side effect of killing you from heart attack or stroke.


I've watched House before. Diagnosing the 5% is simple. It's sarcoidosis. Put them on steroids and they'll be fine in no time.

If only Bernie Mac who died of sarcoidosis had been on the show, he'd still be alive today.


actually, if you look up your symptoms on web md, no matter what they are, the website will tell you that you have cancer...

Exactly. It is like giving a wrench to an average three-year old, and telling them to make something pretty. "These symptoms match both Multiple Sclerosis, and the rare tropical disease Kuru, endemic to the Fore Tribe of Papua New Guinea...which one COULD IT BE?!"

Anonymous rho June 04, 2012 9:01 PM  

"Generally, with armpit measurement, anything up to 42C (107.6F) is considered to be of little concern for children and adults (but probably not babies). Above that is danger zone."

Really? I suppose I'd waive off medical treatment at104F personally, but anything above 101F in an infant I'd ring alarm bells, regardless of the measurement technique.

How many kids do you have Markku? I ask, because there's the principle-vs-practice factor that I'm interested in.

Anonymous Dr. Idle Spectator, Johns Hopkins June 04, 2012 9:06 PM  

When I arrived at Ft. Benning in the late '80s for b.t. we were given several vaccines.For the next few days we had what seemed to be the 'mother of all hangovers'. Our urine and feces was black and smelly. I now know it was blood.

That's not blood, that is your body "expelling the evil." You think that is bad, go look up Lariam (Mefloquine) used a prophylactic for Malaria. I'm not entirely sure giving medication that can increase psychiatric events is double-plus good in a population working around heavy weaponry.

And Gulf War Syndrome. What the hell is going on with that one? It has been 20 years and they still have not figured it out yet.

Researchers Narrow Gulf War Syndrome Causes

"A report titled Gulf War Illness and the Health of Gulf War Veterans was released by the Department of Veteran's Affairs in November 2008, consolidating all research on the syndrome to date."

"Today's Soldiers don't exhibit any of the same symptoms," Forsythe said. "We're talking about the same geographical region. So what happened to these servicemembers in 1990-91 that's not happing now' That's really the central question."

"There is no one test that will yield a definitive diagnosis for this illness that affects 25-32 percent of Gulf War veterans..."

Anonymous Noah B. June 04, 2012 10:26 PM  

@tabasco

Crazy stuff. Did you find out what those vaccines were, and do you remember?

Anonymous Rosalys June 04, 2012 10:31 PM  

Nate, I am indeed making assumptions that vaccines actually work - because they do. Polio, small pox anyone? Even back during the American War of Independence it was known that the small pox vaccination sometimes resulted in death, but many got it anyway weighing the potential risk against the benefits. It's also known that a certain percentage of the population, usually small, will react badly to any particular vaccine. I personally knew someone who died from a flu vaccine many years ago, a neighbor, a man in his 60s. However, it's ridiculous for you to say that "there is virtually no evidence to suggest" that vaccines don't work.

James Dixon, as there weren't as many vaccines back then the schedule was indeed different 30 years ago. Most of the viruses they protected against - polio, small pox, whooping cough - have a high mortality rate in children. I don't know about the need for vaccinating for chicken pox and mumps unless you make it to adulthood without getting them as they are usually mild in children and very bad for adults.

Everyone should have the liberty to make decisions about these matters for themselves and their family.

Anonymous tabasco June 04, 2012 11:59 PM  

Sorry Noah B. I dont know. Pardon my crudeness,but I was as the expression goes,"young,dumb,and full of cum." Not to mention 'patriotism'. I thought of it as a rite of Manhood. You know-a moron!--Blazing Saddles.

Blogger Joshua_D June 05, 2012 8:49 AM  

Dr. Idle Spectator, Johns Hopkins June 04, 2012 9:06 PM
And Gulf War Syndrome. What the hell is going on with that one? It has been 20 years and they still have not figured it out yet.


According to WikiDoc™, the #1 treatment for GWS is steroids. Treatment suggestion #2 came back as "Use leeches to drain the bad blood from the accursed," but I'm pretty sure that's some kind of programming error.

Blogger Joshua_D June 05, 2012 8:51 AM  

Much to my total lack of surprise, someone has already beat me to WikiDoc, so please ignore any prospectus y'all receive in the mail.

Anonymous James Dixon June 05, 2012 8:58 AM  

> ....as there weren't as many vaccines back then the schedule was indeed different 30 years ago.

It wasn't just the number of vaccines. I got most of my vaccinations when I started school, at between 5 and 6. Vaccines to children of less than 6 months simply weren't done. I don't think they were even recommended at all until the child reached two or so. Though to be fair, that would be over 40 years ago now, not 30.

Anonymous Wendy June 05, 2012 9:25 AM  

However, it's ridiculous for you to say that "there is virtually no evidence to suggest" that vaccines don't work.

How does one ethically test a vaccine's effectiveness? One doesn't unless one makes oneself the guinea pig and even then, anecdote doesn't equal data. Similarly, how does one test how long the immunity lasts, ethically? Same answer.

Blogger Spacebunny June 05, 2012 10:07 AM  

Polio, small pox anyone

Sanitation? Historical ignorance much?

Blogger Markku June 05, 2012 10:09 AM  

How many kids do you have Markku? I ask, because there's the principle-vs-practice factor that I'm interested in.

I don't have kids, but I've had a couple of fevers in the 41F (105.8F) region without my parents worrying over the fever. Of course you'll want to know what causes it, but if the disease is obvious, the fever itself is no reason to worry. (Note that I said this doesn't apply to babies - the vaccination info only says that anything up to 39C is to be expected, and only means that some fever medication should be given as a pre-emptive medication the next time a booster for that vaccine is given)

OpenID empathological June 05, 2012 11:34 AM  

How disappointing.

Lets show the full hand shall we

Organic food....check
homeopathic meds....check
No vaccines....check
Fluoride mania.....check
Free range whatever.....check

Blogger Markku June 05, 2012 1:05 PM  

homeopathic meds....check
Fluoride mania.....check


At least these two would be completely inaccurate. And the first and last items are pretty much the same.

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