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Saturday, July 07, 2012

AD arrested

And suddenly, a certain NWA song starts going through my mind....
A source with knowledge of the situation tells PFT that the incident culminating in Peterson’s arrest was captured by one or more surveillance cameras. Multiple persons also witnessed the event.

According to the source, Peterson, his girlfriend, and some family members were at a nightclub in Houston. At closing time, a group of police officers entered the club, and they began instructing the remaining patrons to leave.

Peterson wanted to get some water before he left, but an officer told Peterson that he needed to leave. Some words apparently were exchanged, but Peterson eventually walked to the exit with one of the club’s bouncers.

It’s believed that one of the officers then jumped on Peterson’s back from behind and tried to take him down. (Key word: “tried.”) Other officers then joined the fray and completed the arrest.
Now, it's remotely possible that AD was drunk or acting belligerent, but that's entirely out of keeping with his personality and his reputation. And considering we know what cowardly bullies most policemen are, I won't be surprised if AD isn't ever charged.

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44 Comments:

Blogger Giraffe July 07, 2012 3:57 PM  

Multiple surveillance cameras..... Bet we don't get to see the footage.

Anonymous jack July 07, 2012 4:01 PM  

I may be far out of this loop, but who the heck is AD /Peterson?

Anonymous DANIELIVS July 07, 2012 4:13 PM  

I may be far out of this loop, but who the heck is AD /Peterson?

Adrian Peterson

Anonymous DANIELIVS July 07, 2012 4:18 PM  

And I agree Vox, fuck da poh-lease.

Blogger Giraffe July 07, 2012 4:21 PM  

Apparently he has been charged.

Anonymous jm July 07, 2012 4:25 PM  

I expect his being a famous athlete will work in his favor. If he was a regular guy, he'd probably be dead.

Anonymous duckman July 07, 2012 4:36 PM  

Giraffe July 07, 2012 4:21 PM

Apparently he has been charged.

From that link:

A native of Palistine, Texas, Peterson ...


If this fellow is so important in MN, you would think the reporters up there would bother to spell the name of his hometown correctly.

www.mapquest.com/maps?city=Palestine&state=TX

As much as the Middle East is in the news...

Anonymous tiarosa July 07, 2012 4:55 PM  

Palestine, TX

Us hickbillies pronounce it "Pal-uh-STEEN" not "Pal-uh-STINE"

Blogger Galt-in-Da-Box July 07, 2012 5:53 PM  

National Felony League.

Anonymous jerry July 07, 2012 5:54 PM  

For Trayvon!!

Blogger Nate July 07, 2012 6:00 PM  

Yeah... because walking out of a bar is such a felony. And everyone who ever had trouble with the cops had it coming right Galt?

Anonymous Noah B. July 07, 2012 6:19 PM  

If you're ever down in Houston, boy you'd better walk right.

Anonymous tviper July 07, 2012 7:00 PM  

thank you for using the true nickname initials. drives me crazy hearing ignorant commentators call him AP

Anonymous JohnR July 07, 2012 8:06 PM  

The source with knowledge and Giraffe's link have very different accounts of the incident.

The cop was already in the club and working off-duty.

From the article:

"Houston Police Departement spokesperson Kese Smith told Associated Press that an off-duty police officer working security at the nightclub asked Peterson and a group of people he was with to leave because the club was closed. The man, who Smith told Associated Press identified himself as a police officer, left to tell other patrons to leave the club before returning to Peterson's group and making the same request.

Smith said Peterson told the officer that he heard him the first time and pushed the officer in the shoulder, causing him to stumble. The officer told Peterson he was under arrest and to put his hands behind his back. According to AP, Peterson began yelling and "assumed an aggressive stance," so another off-duty officer offered help. Peterson continued to struggle with both officers until he was finally handcuffed with the help of a third off-duty officer. Smith told AP that Peterson complained of shortness of breath after he was taken to a Houston jail and was examined by Houston Fire Department personnel, who said he was OK."

Was the source his agent?

Anonymous zen0 July 07, 2012 8:26 PM  

What is with the preponderance of black football players with wads of cash being arrested. What's up with that?

Is it a culture thing or what?

Anonymous SouthTX July 07, 2012 9:13 PM  

Houston is yankee country. LEO's down here get along with the folks because they are outarmed and the DA keeps them accountable. The Sheriff has a 80% approval rating because he instructs his department to only go after the real dumbasses. Down here, if somebody gets wasted , they call them a cab. Real peace officers. We are very racially integrated, but Conservative. We were the largest city in Ron Pauls district. It's kind of like the understanding Males of the family have. I have friends of all races who I have invited to my home. But they shared my values. If AP had traveled a little further South, this would not have happened.

Anonymous SouthTX July 07, 2012 9:27 PM  

One of my friends whose oldest son is a Houston area SWAT guy says our LE is a laughing stock. I'm OK with that. Up there they will shoot your ass quickly. I prefer my LE as peace officers and most folks knowing how to defend themselves.

Anonymous JMH July 07, 2012 9:40 PM  

Rousting folks out of a club at closing time. What a valuable use of tax dollars. Why, the HPD leadership ought to get a civic medal or something.

Anonymous No_Limit_Bubba™ July 07, 2012 9:48 PM  

Palestinians can't catch a break.

Anonymous Randall July 07, 2012 11:34 PM  

@JMH

The officers were off-duty.

Speaking of "NWA was right", it appears that Casey Anthony's ex-cop father may have had a special relationship with little Caylee before disposing of her body. The question is: who do you believe? A mentally ill woman, a lawyer, or an ex-cop?

(Interview video is 17 minutes long)

Anonymous jwshell July 07, 2012 11:35 PM  

Vox said:

"Now, it's remotely possible that AD was drunk or acting belligerent, but that's entirely out of keeping with his personality and his reputation. And considering we know what cowardly bullies most policemen are, I won't be surprised if AD isn't ever charged."

...and, in my mind, it's VERY likely this cop was belligerent, as bouncers can be on occasion...

Anonymous Papapete July 07, 2012 11:37 PM  

NFL players in general and Vikings in particular have such a sterling reputation to begin with. Almost as upstanding as the Houston PD. I'll wait for the surveillance videos to make my decision. Of course if no videos are forthcoming, that answers the question right there.

Anonymous Joachim Ham Westphal July 07, 2012 11:49 PM  

OT: (to tweak Calvinists)

Highly recommend this blog to Lutherans here. Calvinists, on the other hand, will probably hate it. Arguments presented here, simply rip them apart. And this (blog) coming from a former Calvinist...

Anonymous Cranach the lesser July 08, 2012 12:51 AM  

OT: (further reflections)

Thinking about free trade, or equality (gender, whatever), or unity of purpose, to the ultimate point of ecumenism (where "rubber meets road" in total globalism); none of this can be had.

The simple fact, is that none of us can agree. That is, come to agreement on all pertinent points of the matter. Lutherans (orthodox) are not protestant. Nor are they evangelical in the generic sense. They are truly more orthodox than the Eastern sects. They are more catholic than Romanism.

They are certainly not perfect. They are the closest to the True Church. This is exemplified by necessary distinctions and teaching of Law and Gospel. One cannot possibly comprehend the sacraments, nor the distinction of the Two Realms (secular/spiritual) without it.

We cannot be one. We cannot be equal. We cannot be unified on this planet. Division is our strength.

Anonymous scoobius dubious July 08, 2012 12:54 AM  

Sorta depends on how long they were still hanging around there after the club had closed. Two minutes? Twenty? Almost an hour? Were they acting like they owned the joint? These things could contribute to an atmosphere of irritation and short tempers. On the other hand if they were being hustled out the door in 90 seconds, it goes the other way. But it doesn't sound like that's what happened, if the guy came back to remind them to leave.

Drunk or not, if he shoved the guy hard enough to make him stagger back, if that's true, then the arrest is justified no matter the circumstances. That's simple assault, case closed.

Just because the officer was off-duty doesn't mean he can't make the arrest. Granted, discretion is encouraged in these sorts of matters (i.e. even though it was a technical assault, the officer could choose not to pursue the thing).

But the arrest is likely because:
a) police really, REALLY don't like being assaulted, and
b) professional athletes, esp black ones, have an irritating tendency to act like they're gods. They need to be forcefully reminded that they can't just lay hands on people like that.

From a human-development point of view, athletes in this country (and again, esp black ones) are poorly served by their institutions in this country, because they are coddled and excused and let to get away with shit from middle school on. Everything is subsumed to their prowess, they aren't properly taught to behave decently. Some get that instruction from their families, but many don't.

The entire athletic seeding system in this country, from high school to the pros, esp football, is quite mad.

Anonymous Nikola Maxwell Einstein July 08, 2012 1:02 AM  

OT: (pure weirdness, but probably true)

This will explain things you have wondered about lately. (WARNING: Not for children, or adults with feeble minds)

Anonymous nick digger July 08, 2012 1:47 AM  

A police officer was not assaulted. A security guard, privately employed by the club, was shoved at the shoulder.

And, VD, it is precisely because cops are cowardly bullies, that charges will be filed. It's not always enough to have a gang of thugs on call to back them up; sometimes they need some bitch attorney to deal the knockout blow.

Anonymous JohnR July 08, 2012 7:37 AM  

nick digger: I've seen several stories on this and all say the same thing; "off-duty cop"

See here:

http://www.foxsportsnorth.com/07/07/12/Vikings-Peterson-charged-with-resisting-/msn_landing.html?blockID=757616&feedID=5930

Note the use of "off-duty officer" in the 4th and 5th paragraph, not "security guard."

If you have something different, please post.

Maybe these guys should try going home earlier, nothing good happens after midnight in a club, just as Chris Brown and Tony Parker

Anonymous III July 08, 2012 9:24 AM  

as cops moonlighting as bouncers can be on occasion...

Anonymous III July 08, 2012 9:27 AM  

And, as my lawyer told me many years ago, if he had been just civilian security rather than a a moonlighting cop doing security off duty... you wouldn't even be here.

Anonymous Joe Doakes, Saint Paul, Minnesota July 08, 2012 9:30 AM  

I was city attorney for a small town which included acting as misdemeanor prosecutor. After a while, you realize that police officers write reports from a template using a checklist. The template is not always the same but always includes the same elements:

Date, Time, Location, Driving Conduct, Observations of Driver, field sobriety tests, station tests (breath, blood or alcohol) booking.

The checklist asks under Observations, were his eyes bloodshot? Watery? Did you smell an oder of alcohol coming from the vehicle? Was his pronunciation imprecise?

They learn the template and checklist in cop school. So every DUI report mentions bloodshot and watery eyes, oder of alcohol, difficulty speaking. These are incidia of intoxication that can be observed in person, only, and dissapate rapidly. The officer is the only witness who would be in a position to see them. Makes the guy sound hammered . . . but was he really, or was it just the standard template DUI report knowing it can't be challenged by any other credible witness?

There's a checklist and a template for disorderly conduct/assault, too. Don't read too much into the police reports and discount them appropriately.

Anonymous harry12 July 08, 2012 11:05 AM  

Local News Item:
Few Details in Deputy's Fatal Shooting of Man, 21

By Carlos E. Medina
Correspondent

Published: Saturday, July 7, 2012 at 6:30 a.m.
Last Modified: Saturday, July 7, 2012 at 6:24 p.m.

Many of the details in the fatal shooting of a 21-year-old man by a Marion County sheriff’s deputy remain a mystery. The agency declined to release more information a day after the Friday night incident.

Sheriff’s officials identified the dead man as Joshua Salvato, but beyond that they referred all questions regarding the shooting to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, which investigates law enforcement shootings.


Tough outcome for disorderly conduct...

Blogger mmaier2112 July 08, 2012 11:08 AM  

Sort of like a "furtive gesture" if a pig shoots someone...

Anonymous DT July 08, 2012 12:20 PM  

Note the use of "off-duty officer" in the 4th and 5th paragraph, not "security guard."

Distinction without difference. One of the problems we have in this country...and one of the reasons cops think of themselves as gods...is that cops are treated as cops 24/7. This is wrong. Once off duty a cop should legally have the same exact rights, responsibilities, and powers as any other citizen. I've read one too many stories of cops moonlighting as private security acting like a-holes and then pulling the "cop card" at the last minute on some innocent bystander. This happens all the time in altercations over photographer rights.

The first of many problems this creates is that a citizen thinks he's dealing with a private security guard only to be legally hit with "disobeying a lawful order" and/or "resisting arrest." I'm sorry, but if the cop did not announce he was a cop and show his badge then the citizen cannot be guilty of those things, can he? A LEO and a security guard exist on two radically different legal planes, and a citizen's legal options, rights, and responses to either are therefore radically different.

This situation also creates a conflict of interest as the LEO serves two masters and will be tempted to use the state's powers in the service of private interests. Further, it creates liabilities for the state and therefore the taxpayer. Why should the taxpayer be liable if a cop harms or kills someone while off duty?

None of this should be allowed. If we want cops to be cops 24/7, then moonlighting should not be allowed under penalty of being fired for the first offense. If cops are allowed to moonlight, then they are not cops the second they are off duty. Even saying "I'm a cop" in an altercation while off duty should result in the cop being fired. Pulling a gun or arresting someone should result in the same charges and penalties that would result for any citizen doing the same.

In addition to solving the above problems, this would help teach law enforcement some much needed humility and combat the "us vs. them" mentality.

And if I'm ever on a jury in a situation like the one with AD, I will interpret the matter as if the cop was not a cop regardless of the court's instructions.

In this case AD may indeed have committed assault (you don't shove someone). But none of the "off duty officers" had any power of physical arrest while off duty. Their actions amount to assault, unlawful arrest, and false imprisonment. I would acquit.

Anonymous DT July 08, 2012 12:38 PM  

One more note: if cops were not cops while off duty, and were forbidden from mentioning their employment in any altercation or any situation involving on duty law enforcement, then it might temper their behavior while on duty.

Right now if an off duty cop gets pulled over he flashes a badge and all is well. If his badge was taken from him once off duty, and if it were a criminal offense to even mention his job during a traffic stop, then he would be in the same situation as every other citizen. Same treatment, same concerns, same fears, same experience. Being on the other side might temper his behavior while on duty.

Cops live in a bubble in large part due to the nonsense of having their powers 24/7. That bubble needs to burst.

Anonymous JMH July 08, 2012 1:29 PM  

Distinction without difference. One of the problems we have in this country...and one of the reasons cops think of themselves as gods...is that cops are treated as cops 24/7. This is wrong. Once off duty a cop should legally have the same exact rights, responsibilities, and powers as any other citizen.

I agree. Further, there is a form of corruption frequently present where organizations trying to put on events are required by the local permitting authority to hire off-duty police officers for security or traffic direction or what not. This is a sop to the police unions, giving their members a forcibly guranteed second income stream, in addition to their tax-payer funded salary and benefits.

I'm willing to let cops retain some of their authority when off-duty, but not when they're moonlighting.

Anonymous scoobius dubious July 08, 2012 5:50 PM  

"But none of the "off duty officers" had any power of physical arrest while off duty."

Not sure this is technically true, even if it's morally or politically supportable. I suppose it depends on the state, but I think it's possible that cops are legally deputized to act 24/7, on-duty or off, if they observe unlawful activity. A quick check of the books could clear the matter up, but it's what I've observed in life, and it's not a power trip when I see it; the cops I know, when they see bad shit going down, step in and deal with it even if they're off duty. I've never seen an off-duty cop make an actual arrest, but I've seen them use their authority to break shit up conclusively.

As I keep saying, we live in a physical, human world, not one governed by abstract principles. If you want a bunch of people to do a difficult, complicated, dangerous job for not very much money, then you're going to have to provide perks. And two of the perks for cops are enhanced esprit de corps, and a sense of authority, which is of course a kind of drug. Just depends on the dosage. If you don't want to give these out, then pay more. A lot more.

Anonymous scoobius dubious July 08, 2012 5:59 PM  

One of the funny things is, cops and the criminal underclass tend to speak a kind of specialized lingua franca in common, terms and phrases that a person who's never been arrested or processed would probably never have heard. So very often, when something uncool is happening, an off-duty cop doesn't even have to formally identify himself as an officer, he just has to speak this language and the perp knows to step off. In my (admittedly limited) observation, this usually defuses things before they get to the point where an arrest would even be necessary.

For normal civilians who are just acting out, who would not recognize these signals because they're not that type, other mild signals are available.

Anonymous DT July 08, 2012 8:04 PM  

Not sure this is technically true, even if it's morally or politically supportable.

I should have typed: But none of the "off duty officers" should have had any power of physical arrest while off duty.

The sentence is in the context of my earlier statement: And if I'm ever on a jury in a situation like the one with AD, I will interpret the matter as if the cop was not a cop regardless of the court's instructions.

AFAIK in most or all states cops have their powers 24/7. Sorry for the confusion.

As I keep saying, we live in a physical, human world, not one governed by abstract principles. If you want a bunch of people to do a difficult, complicated, dangerous job for not very much money, then you're going to have to provide perks.

Oh please. At least in southern California, cops easily make 2-3x the average middle class wage, and do so with far more benefits, far better retirement, far more job security, and early retirement options. Those who move up the ranks and play the system can build a retirement 3x the average wage of a middle class worker. That's retirement pay.

They have enough perks. As I said, if they lost their powers the minute they went off duty maybe they would learn a bit of humility, improving relations and performance all around.

And if they are going to have their powers 24/7 then they should be absolutely forbidden from taken any other job which would involve the use of said powers. Those powers are bestowed by the state, the taxpaying citizen. They are not to be used for private gain. The conflict of interest and potential liability is simply too great.

Anonymous HeligKo July 09, 2012 11:10 AM  

The argument that cops need to be paid more to expect them to behave themselves is stupid, Scoobius. Firefighters and EMS do just fine getting high off the excitement on their job with very little authority compared to police and almost none when off duty. We live in a police state. When an officer can stop you for any reason when you are driving, because driving is not a right but a privilege, you have given them the right to overstep their authority every time you enter a car. Not just drive a car, but enter a car. Police forces are too large. People have given up their freedoms for the sense of security, and as predicted by Franklin we are quickly moving towards having neither as we deserve.

Police on and off duty should be held to a higher standard, because of the authority we have given them. By allowing them to be held to a lower standard, we are getting what we deserve.

The primary problem we have is the idea that the police are somehow responsible for preventing crime. In a free society, the only person who can prevent crime is the potential victims. After that the police have the job of catching the alleged criminals. We are not free, and are becoming less so every time a new crime prevention bill of any kind is passed.

Anonymous scoobius dubious July 09, 2012 11:56 AM  

"The argument that cops need to be paid more to expect them to behave themselves is stupid, Scoobius."

No it isn't. Just because you say so, doesn't make it so. Plus, "behave themselves" is prejudicial. I'm not asking them to "behave themselves" like they're adolescent boys on a fishing trip, I expect them to conform to highly complicated rules of conduct with like a 1,400 page law/rule book in the face of instantaneous personal danger; these things are not the same. Check your logic, and don't talk back to me until you do.

"Firefighters and EMS do just fine getting high off the excitement on their job with very little authority compared to police and almost none when off duty."

All this merits is an Oh, Christ. You don't know any LEOs, do you.

"Police forces are too large. People have given up their freedoms for the sense of security, and as predicted by Franklin we are quickly moving towards having neither as we deserve.

This is an interesting and serious comment. It's not possible to discuss it in earnest without bringing in racial angles and racial issues here, so I won't discuss it here. But at least it's an ideation worthy of a serious adult. Which your previous blitherings weren't.

Anonymous Clay July 09, 2012 1:33 PM  

Well, if you believe TMZ:

"Adrian Peterson was heavily intoxicated at the time of his arrest, which was very out of character for the NFL star ... this according to the club where he was busted early this morning.

Daniel Maher, general manager of Live at Bayou Place, tells TMZ that Peterson has been to the club before, but he has never known him to drink much. Last night, however, Maher said Peterson was ver drunk and was a difficult customer all night.

Maher says Peterson was throwing his ego around and making people mad, so they put him in the VIP area. Maher says when the club was closing, he rushed over to the bar to try and order one last drink and when he wouldn't Maher says Peterson "tried to intimidate the bartender" into selling it to him.

According to Maher, that's when he intervened, but Peterson continued to be "unreasonable." That's when Maher says the off-duty cop intervened, and, as TMZ first reported, Peterson proceeded to shove him.

Maher says during his confrontation with the officer, Peterson assumed a fight stance and looked "like he meant business." Maher says, "He looked really scary and I thought he was gonna attack the cops."

Maher says that once the officers subdued Peterson, the NFL star apologized for his behavior and told cops he doesn't usually drink.

Peterson was eventually booked into jail and charged with resisting arrest.

Calls to Peterson's rep were not returned."


Surely, there has to be a white stripper somewhere in this wood pile.

Anonymous William Meisheid July 09, 2012 2:04 PM  

No where does it say they identified themselves as police officers. Off-duty is off duty and gives them no special dispensation.

That said, it is not unusual for patrons to push on bouncers, so getting pushed is a poor excuse for "arresting" someone when they do not know you are an officer and have shifted from acting as a "bouncer" to a "police officer."

Would be interesting to see the tape. If it is "unavailable" then any "official" version is doubtful.

Anonymous Mike43 July 09, 2012 6:04 PM  

Sorry, I live in Houston, and I must jump in here.

We pay our cops crappola. Part of it is that they can make much more off duty in full uniform working on city approved jobs.

(I know, doesn't make much sense, but that's what has been developed.)

So, the cops were working a city approved job and pretty have carte blanche to do what they want. They were in full uniform. Iknow because I see it every weekend in the restaurants and bars in Houston. BTW, my oldest son got tazered by an HPD off duty cop, and we barely could find his name. Of the 200+ police brutality reports sent to Internal Affairs, only 2 were investigated, last year. Very protective, and very brutal.

AD, despite hiring Rusty Hardin, will never get a chance to plea out, unless it's the top count. The DA loves celebrity trials and a football player. Please, just more media coverage.

Remember, this is the county that routinely sends 30 - 50 to death row each year.

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