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Friday, September 28, 2012

Silver lining in the vibrant cloud

Imagine there's no FBI, it's easy if you try:
In a stunning development, President-elect Enrique Peña and his Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), who won control of Mexico’s government on July 1st, moved to dissolve the Agencia Federal de Investigación (AFI).

Modeled after the United States FBI, the AFI was founded in 2001 to crack down on Mexico’s pervasive government corruption and drug trafficking. With rival drug cartels murdering between 47,500 to 67,000 Mexicans over the last six years, the move by the PRI represents the total surrender of Mexico’s sovereignty back to the money and violence of Mexico’s two main drug cartels, the Sinaloa Federation and Los Zetas. 
I find it amusing that the pro-drug war writer of this article fails to recognize the connection between the founding of the AFI, the Mexican drug war, and the subsequent increase in the drug-related violence in Mexico.  If the drug violence falls considerably with the dissolution of the AFI and the eventual legalization of drugs in Mexico, no doubt he'll also fail to draw the obvious conclusion there as well.

There haven't been a lot of observable societal benefits to the influx of 50 million Mexicans, but getting rid of the FBI, the DEA, and the drug war would certainly be a major one.

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26 Comments:

Anonymous dh September 28, 2012 5:06 AM  

The FBI would be fine if it did the nominal things it was designed for, and especially highly technical or complex investigations. For example, involving financing. But of course, it's not that. It's the Federal sword & shield.

Anonymous Sexual Chocolate September 28, 2012 5:12 AM  

Now if Mexico legalizes all drugs, clean prostitution (i.e. Chicken Ranch), and personal tactical nuclear missiles, then I may have to move down there personally with Fred. Hell, what I am I waiting for? May as well move down there right now. Texas is really going to be slow to independence and their own republic. Besides, Mexico can't even afford a TSA, and the surfing is much better (sans the sea snakes) ...

Anonymous DT September 28, 2012 5:18 AM  

See Vox? Diversity really is our strength.

Anonymous zen0 September 28, 2012 6:02 AM  

Favorite name from article:

Horst Walther Overdick.

He began as a cardamon exporter.

Must be a gateway spice.

Blogger LP 999/Eliza September 28, 2012 6:11 AM  

Well, well!

I wonder what the drug gangs will do now?

Blogger LP 999/Eliza September 28, 2012 7:03 AM  

OT: amazing what business week glosses over

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-09-28/the-plight-of-young-black-men-is-worse-than-you-think

Anonymous The Great Martini September 28, 2012 7:13 AM  

The FBI is actually a pretty effective agency, particularly combined with federal legislation that aids law enforcement. Any agency that can take out the American Mafia, which it did, except for a few strongholds, in the 20th century, isn't all that impotent. Of course, it can be successfully argued that the rise of the American Mafia was also created by federal powers, the 18th Amendment. Well, the feds giveth, and they taketh away.

Blogger Nate September 28, 2012 7:44 AM  

If the cost of ditching the drug war, the fbi, and the DEA, is loud marchiachi music and obnoxious flag waving brown people at UFC events... I'm all in.

Anonymous Josh September 28, 2012 7:57 AM  

Seems like a fair trade, Nate.

Anonymous Athor Pel September 28, 2012 8:08 AM  

The more powerful you make the agency the harder they are to clean up when they get bought. And they will get bought.


Anonymous Wild Thing September 28, 2012 8:12 AM  

OT - The Pentagon has declared Julian Assange an "enemy of the state".

Drone time?

Anonymous zeonxavier September 28, 2012 8:26 AM  

Athor, it's been a very long time since the Feds have seen more than a cursory cleanup, as far as I know.

I remember hearing the IRS had to behave under Bush, but I haven't heard that about any other agencies since even before that.

Anonymous Stilicho September 28, 2012 8:49 AM  

Just imagine the flow of stoners to Mexico, not to mention those seeking more exotic highs. Tijuana may become the new Amsterdam. Ok, probably not Tijuana, but the resort towns may become more popular than ever.

Blogger Giraffe September 28, 2012 8:59 AM  

The worst part about ending the war on drugs will be all the DEA agents standing around with nothing to do. They will have to find some new tyranny to enforce.

Blogger swiftfoxmark2 September 28, 2012 9:30 AM  

There haven't been a lot of observable societal benefits to the influx of 50 million Mexicans, but getting rid of the FBI, the DEA, and the drug war would certainly be a major one.

Actually, if Mexico manages to legalize drugs and abolish its Federal enforcement agencies, then there will be less immigrants coming to the United States from Mexico.

Anonymous MendoScot September 28, 2012 10:55 AM  

Drone, drone, drone.

In the United States, the dominant narrative about the use of drones in Pakistan is of a surgically precise and effective tool that makes the US safer by enabling “targeted killing” of terrorists, with minimal downsides or collateral impacts.

This narrative is false.


H/t Gonzalo Lira.

Blogger JohnG September 28, 2012 11:50 AM  

I'm all for getting rid of the DEA (never was fond of their ability to seize property regardless of whether you were involved or not). Not too sure on the FBI, they bring a level of education and expertise to criminal investigation that local cops tend not to have. Now if you got rid of the FBIs SWAT teams that probably would address the issue I think is being made.

All a bit OBE (overcome by events) now however. With the trillion or so rounds being bought up by all the government agencies - we're going to have untrained and unprofessional bureaucrats trying to do law enforcement (soon?).

Blogger JohnG September 28, 2012 11:57 AM  

"Actually, if Mexico manages to legalize drugs and abolish its Federal enforcement agencies, then there will be less immigrants coming to the United States from Mexico." - swiftfoxmark2

I don't think so, when the jobs dry up, the real laborers move somewhere where there are jobs (I think Mexico actually has a lower unemployment rate currently than we do). The big draw now is states like California that hand out welfare checks no-questions-asked. I'd also cite child tax credits for 14 kids all named Juan and Jose that have funny social security numbers, but they wouldn't have to actually be in the US to engage in that kind of fraud.

Blogger James Dixon September 28, 2012 12:13 PM  

> They will have to find some new tyranny to enforce.

They'll move to New York and start checking the sizes of soft drink containers.

Anonymous WaterBoy September 28, 2012 4:06 PM  

Stilicho: "Just imagine the flow of stoners to Mexico, not to mention those seeking more exotic highs. Tijuana may become the new Amsterdam."

The way things may pan out, they might not even have to go that far, soon.

It's the New And Improved Rocky Mountain High.

Anonymous Jake September 28, 2012 4:11 PM  

The worst part about ending the war on drugs will be all the DEA agents standing around with nothing to do. They will have to find some new tyranny to enforce.

Kinda like how the NFA conveniently came along about the time prohibition ended...

Anonymous Daniel September 28, 2012 4:24 PM  

The FBI will probably be outgunned by the Dept. of Ed. before it closes up shop.

So...no sooner than Tuesday.

Anonymous Daniel September 28, 2012 4:29 PM  

In other vibrancy news:

Raceless Little Girls Help Retarded Woman with their Fists.

Blogger Astrosmith September 28, 2012 8:16 PM  

WB, I'll be voting for legalization. You?

Anonymous WaterBoy September 28, 2012 8:48 PM  

Definitely. It will save millions on enforcement costs, alone.

Anonymous Anonymous September 30, 2012 11:12 AM  

Why is it the death toll in Mexico defined by the Presidency of Calderon? What about the slaughter under Fox (for a week all drugs became legal under him), and heck, long before him too. They've been tossing reporters out of aeroplanes, vanishing human rights activists in the Sonoran desert, and using bazookas on rivals for a very long time. For a history of its innocent beginnings read Weed by Jerry Kamstra.

So, when did Mexico first surrender its sovereignty? Did it really ever give it up in the first place?

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