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Monday, September 17, 2012

That wonderful immigrant food

This may be an effective counterpoint to the clueless wonders who, in response to all the government spending, crime, and declining property values, rhapsodize about the great [fill-in-the-blank] restaurants now contributing to the community by expanding their culinary options:
An undercover investigation has revealed a shocking trade in illegal 'bush meat' at a London market - including the sale of dead rats for human consumption. Charred sheep skins, another favourite in west Africa known as 'smokies', are also being sold by butchers at the Ridley Road market in Dalson, east London. A BBC investigation using hidden cameras uncovered at least six butchers selling the illegal meats, breaking UK food safety laws....

One Hackney butcher sold a researcher some of the illicit meat and said: 'Don’t tell anyone, otherwise there will be trouble.' Two African food stores were selling the grasscutter rats, described as having been imported from Ghana.
If moving to a first-world country can't break some people of their habit of eating rats, how can anyone give any credibility to the idea that a simple change in geographic location is going to change literally everything about their cultural values and societal traditions?

Labels:

84 Comments:

Anonymous cheddarman September 17, 2012 1:05 PM  

On the up side, 3rd world immigration is a great opportunity for food scientists to ply their trade, converting rat meat and other commodities into value added products.

Sincerely

Cheddarman

Anonymous Daniel September 17, 2012 1:06 PM  

But they've got such a great marketing campaign:

Rats. It's what's for dhimmi.

Anonymous JN September 17, 2012 1:07 PM  

It's called a rat but its more like a R.O.U.S.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_Cane_Rat

Anonymous Azimus September 17, 2012 1:11 PM  

This seems to be arguing from emotion rather than logic here... Maybe the rats were delicious!

Anonymous DrTorch September 17, 2012 1:14 PM  

What happens when they start importing live vermin? Eco-catastrophe.

Libs should be outraged.

Anonymous Cheddarman September 17, 2012 1:15 PM  

These rats grow to be 10 kilograms (22 pounds) in the wild. They have been domesticated, and are commonly grown for food.

One wonders how soon they will be established in the wild as Europe's latest invasive species.

Since mammals tend to grow in size as distance from the equator increases, perhaps these rats originating in equatorial Africa may soon reach man eating proportions in the wilds of Brittan.

Sincerely

Cheddarman

Anonymous Holla September 17, 2012 1:16 PM  

It's not a sewer rat. It looks more like a nutria.

And I don't think that the English, world-renown for having the absolute worst cuisine, have any high culinary ground to stand on.

Anonymous trk September 17, 2012 1:17 PM  

i only eat 100% free range grasscutter rats

Blogger Doom September 17, 2012 1:18 PM  

I wonder how many such investigations are stopped or otherwise kept secret even if acted upon, here or there? I would bet money that the polls showing 37% to 22% (or something close) of British subjects would now vote for an an anti-immigrant politician has more to do with the story coming to press, let alone action being taken, than any concern for laws, health, or other consideration.

Blogger ajw308 September 17, 2012 1:23 PM  

Oh, come on, I can think of one Kenyan born immigrant who eats gourmet food.

Anonymous Josh September 17, 2012 1:26 PM  

Insert rant about how the government shouldn't be regulating food...

Of course the main point is that importing third world savage immigrants is a profoundly stupid policy.

Anonymous Salt September 17, 2012 1:27 PM  

Oh Rat Farts!

Anonymous Knarf September 17, 2012 1:29 PM  

Yum, rats! Tastes just like squirrel.

Anonymous WaterBoy September 17, 2012 1:30 PM  

Vox: "If moving to a first-world country can't break some people of their habit of eating rats, how can anyone give any credibility to the idea that a simple change in geographic location is going to change literally everything about their cultural values and societal traditions?"

Well, I suppose it would mostly depend on how they prepared the rat.

I mean, if they just threw some salt on it and skewered it on a spit over open flames, then sure, they're barbarians.

But Rat Wellington? Or Rat Lasagna? Now you're talking!

Anonymous Knarf September 17, 2012 1:34 PM  

@ JN

Holy Cow! Up to two feet long (excluding tail) and weighing up to 20 lbs? I've had cats smaller than that!

I mean owned cats, not had them like, on my dinner plate...

Anonymous Knarf September 17, 2012 1:36 PM  

Holla has a point. Grasscutter Rat el rancho, or bangers and mash? Hmm. Let me think about that.

Anonymous Stickwick September 17, 2012 1:39 PM  

My husband recently returned from a trip to Finland, where he and his brother got very sick after eating at a Turkish kabob place. Not only is it difficult to determine what exactly comprises the mystery meat served in some of these places, but their cleanliness practices are often below standard.

Anonymous Holla September 17, 2012 1:39 PM  

Dump some Marmite on the rat and you might have edible Marmite.

Anonymous Knarf September 17, 2012 1:40 PM  

It's all in how you name it.

"There are two commonly-used names in the English language for Myocastor coypus. The name "nutria" (or local derivatives such as "nutria- or nutra- rat") is generally used in North America and Asia; however, in Spanish-speaking countries, the word "nutria" refers to the otter. To avoid this ambiguity, the name "coypu" (derived from the Mapudungun language) is used in Latin America and Europe.[7] In France, the coypu is known as a ragondin. In Dutch it is known as beverrat (beaver rat). In Italy, instead, the popular name is, as in North America and Asia, "nutria", but it is also called castorino ("little beaver"), by which its fur is known in Italy."

Yeah, Spacebunny? About that beaver fur coat Vox gave you last Christmas....

Anonymous WaterBoy September 17, 2012 1:43 PM  

"Charred sheep skins, another favourite in west Africa known as 'smokies', are also being sold by butchers at the Ridley Road market in Dalson, east London."

Su-u-u-u-re, eating the sheep skins are gross. But stuff their stomachs full of their own organs, and call me for dinner!

Anonymous Roundtine September 17, 2012 1:48 PM  

How did the Chinese escape notice? They've been there far longer and they eat far stranger things.

Anonymous Holla September 17, 2012 1:51 PM  

"Charred sheep skins,"

Yes, because no one south of the Mason Dixon ever at a pork rind, bought a plastic gallon tub of chitterlings from the Piggly Wiggly, or hunted and ate squirrel.

Actually, the Ugandan cuisine sounds positively first-world compared to the shit people eat in, say, the Ozarks (who in their right mind would eat an opossum?)

****
And now, based on the absolute failure of this post, I will propose a theory:

This mysterious, vaunted AI that Vox has is actually writing these blog posts of late. In essence, Vox has created an even more retarded computerized simulation of himself.

Anonymous Holla September 17, 2012 1:53 PM  

"that vox has cryptically mentioned"

Oh, and since I'm already typing:

"Spacebunny" was the beta test.

Anonymous VD September 17, 2012 1:58 PM  

But Rat Wellington? Or Rat Lasagna? Now you're talking!

A friend of ours was defending third world cuisine right up to the point that she remembered getting violently ill after finally being convinced to eat dinner with the locals in India one evening. Apparently the lasagna del topo, complete with little rib cages, didn't agree with her.

Anonymous Yep. September 17, 2012 1:59 PM  

My husband recently returned from a trip to Finland, where he and his brother got very sick after eating at a Turkish kabob place.

Is that how they refer to the clap these days?

Anonymous WaterBoy September 17, 2012 2:00 PM  

M-m-m-m-m...nutria.

Anonymous Gen. Kong September 17, 2012 2:06 PM  

Daniel:

Rats. It's what's for dhimmi.

Brilliant.

Blogger IM2L844 September 17, 2012 2:06 PM  

a shocking trade in illegal 'bush meat'

Ha! I've seen this in a variety of metropolitan areas across the U.S. and even partook once when I was a young kid in the military just so I could say that I had.

Anonymous WaterBoy September 17, 2012 2:08 PM  

VD: "Apparently the lasagna del topo, complete with little rib cages, didn't agree with her."

Unfortunate. But it's typically not the food, but the storage and preparation thereof which is generally the culprit.

There were 30 deaths around the US last year in the outbreak of listeria that was tied to improper farming of cantaloupe a little south of here. Bacteria's a bitch.

Anonymous Stilicho September 17, 2012 2:09 PM  

Speaking of strange foods there's this:

Castoreum is a specific type of natural flavoring. This extract is made from secretions and glands near the anus of both male and female beavers. It has a very strong odor and bitter taste.

and this:
Castoreum (pronunciation: /kæˈstɔriəm/) is the exudate from the castor sacs of the mature North American Beaver (Castor canadensis) and the European Beaver (Castor fiber). Within the zoological realm, castoreum is the yellowish secretion of the castor sac in combination with the beaver's urine, used during scent marking of territory.[1][2] Both male and female beavers possess a pair of castor sacs and a pair of anal glands located in two cavities under the skin between the pelvis and the base of the tail.[3] The castor sacs are not true glands (endocrine or exocrine) on a cellular level, hence references to these structures as preputial glands or castor glands are misnomers.[4]

Today, it is used as a tincture in some perfumes[5] and as a food additive...
...In the United States, castoreum as a food additive is considered by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be generally recognized as safe,[11] often referenced simply as a "natural flavoring" in products' lists of ingredients. While it can be used in both foods and beverages as a vanilla, raspberry and strawberry flavoring,[12] the annual industry consumption is only around 300 pounds.[13]

Castoreum has been traditionally used in Scandinavia for flavoring snaps commonly referred to as "Bäverhojt".


Seriously, who's the guy who thought to put beaver-sqeezin's into food? Only the government could call that "natural flavoring."

Anonymous Gen. Kong September 17, 2012 2:10 PM  

Knarf:

I mean owned cats, not had them like, on my dinner plate...

Be assured that D'Won on d'downlow has eaten dogs bigger than that.

Blogger James Dixon September 17, 2012 2:13 PM  

> "Spacebunny" was the beta test.

Holla, do I really need to point out rule #7 to you? You've been here long enough to know better.

Blogger Vidad, AKA David the Good September 17, 2012 2:17 PM  

As long as they weren't trans rats.

Anonymous Stilicho September 17, 2012 2:17 PM  

who in their right mind would eat an opossum?

Perhaps the same type who consider this to be food.

Seriously, Holla, bull penis? For lunch?

Anonymous Stickwick September 17, 2012 2:22 PM  

Castoreum has been traditionally used in Scandinavia for flavoring snaps commonly referred to as "Bäverhojt".

Beaver-squeezin's, LOL.

Scandinavians do have some interesting gastronomical preferences, many of which would turn the stomachs of Americans. The grossest one I've ever heard of is surströmming (rotted, fermented herring). Still, it's just a common fish prepared in an unusual way, albeit with the extra-unusual property that it can make you sick before you eat it.

Anonymous Gen. Kong September 17, 2012 2:24 PM  

Stilicho:
Castoreum has been traditionally used in Scandinavia for flavoring snaps commonly referred to as "Bäverhojt".

Seriously, who's the guy who thought to put beaver-sqeezin's into food? Only the government could call that "natural flavoring.


Considering that the Scandinavians are also inventors of Surströmming, a canned Herring that is not considered ready until the can is bulging (and must be opened under water), beaver-squezzin's as a flavoring seems somehow in character.

Anonymous Gen. Kong September 17, 2012 2:27 PM  

I see stickwick and I were on the same wavelength. I understand that Surströmming is often consumed with copious amounts of vodka both before and after.

Anonymous Holla September 17, 2012 2:27 PM  

Stilicho

Yes, because white people don't eat Prairie Oysters.

And at least a bull penis isn't all filled with bull semen like giant testes are likely to be.

Blogger Giraffe September 17, 2012 2:30 PM  

Holla, I thought you liked swallowing semen.

Anonymous Stilicho September 17, 2012 2:30 PM  

Holla, perhaps you should read the entry right under bull penis:

Bull testicles: if we (mexicans) eat the penis, why not the testicles too, this are called "criadillas"

Anonymous Holla September 17, 2012 2:36 PM  

Stilicho:

After a lifetime of eating MExican food, have yet to run into a bull cock or balls.

However, you didn't answer for the white people crimes of Prairie Oysters.

And I fail to see how eating a testicle is any worse, than, say, eating a urine filter known as a kidney, which brings us right back around to the disgusting British.

Anonymous WaterBoy September 17, 2012 2:37 PM  

Stickwick: "with the extra-unusual property that it can make you sick before you eat it"

The Wikipedia article that Gen. Kong linked mentions that it has been banned from several airlines, due to the risk of accidental explosion of the pressurized container.

Heck, I'd ban it just on the risk that somebody might intentionally open it, alone. In that kind of enclosed space, you'd have several people retching.

Anonymous Stickwick September 17, 2012 2:40 PM  

I understand that Surströmming is often consumed with copious amounts of vodka both before and after.

My own completely unscientific hypothesis is that all disgusting European foods were based on drunken dares and somehow got turned into traditional cuisine. Which would also explain the usual accompaniment of copious amounts of booze.

Anonymous Knarf September 17, 2012 2:42 PM  

As for Surströmming -- isn't that the cause of that news story that was floating around the wires a week or so ago, about emergency responders in Stockholm being called in to deal with a gas leak, only to find that the foul smell was coming from a vat of Surström-- Surstr-- dead stinky fish?

Anonymous Noah B. September 17, 2012 2:42 PM  

Eating rats is pretty innocuous compared to the murders and child rapes that are endemic to some of these vibrant cultures.

Anonymous Knarf September 17, 2012 2:46 PM  

I dunno.

"...(or local derivatives such as "nutria- or nutra- rat")..."

NutraRat? I can see that showing up on school lunch menus. Endorsed by the First Lady, even. It's lean, free-range, no growth hormones.

Quick. Let's trademark it. We'll make a fortune.

Anonymous TLM September 17, 2012 2:48 PM  

I'd take the rat over illegal Mexican immigrant homemade bath-tub cheese any day.

Blogger Kentucky Packrat September 17, 2012 2:48 PM  

One neighbor's kids were particularly obnoxious, and I wasn't happy that they were at the house. They were watching Total Drama Island with Little Miss and the other kids, and the contestants had to eat calf fries. "What are calf fries?" "When beef calves are castrated, they take the testes, bread them, and fry them." That crew never crossed the fence to play with us again.

Never bothered me that the calves were the hamburger, but calf fries always were just plain wrong.

Both of my grandfathers could eat the nastiest of foods. Grandfather R I understand; he basically starved as a kid (something about great-granddaddy R being a compulsive gambler and drinker....). Grandfather B grew up rich, but his favorite food was pickled pigs feet. It still nauseates me thinking about it.

Anonymous Stilicho September 17, 2012 3:01 PM  

After a lifetime of eating MExican food, have yet to run into a bull cock or balls.

Is THAT how they are "enjoyed"? That would certainly explain the widespread desire to get north of the Rio Grande.

However, you didn't answer for the white people crimes of Prairie Oysters.

They were clearly celebrating Cinco de Mayo.

Anonymous No_Limit_Bubba™ September 17, 2012 3:09 PM  

The waiter replied, "Ah senor, you have excellent taste! Those are called Cojones de Toro, bull's testicles from the bull fight this morning. A delicacy!  A special Mexican Cuisine Treat!"
The cowboy said, "What the heck, bring me an order."
The waiter replied, "I am so sorry senor. There is only one serving per day because there is only one bull fight each morning. If you come early and place your order, we will be sure to save you this delicacy."
The next morning, the cowboy returned, placed his order, and that evening was served the one and only special delicacy of the day. After a few bites, inspecting his platter, he called to the waiter and said, "These are delicious, but they are much, much smaller than the ones I saw you serve yesterday."
The waiter shrugged his shoulders and replied, "Si, Senor. Sometimes the bull wins."

I'll be here all week. Please tip your waitstaff.

Anonymous Stickwick September 17, 2012 3:19 PM  

Both of my grandfathers could eat the nastiest of foods. ... Grandfather B grew up rich, but his favorite food was pickled pigs feet.

My stepfather grew up on a farm, where the motto was waste not, want not. His dad (who was a college professor) would sometimes fry up the brains of a freshly-slaughtered calf with his scrambled eggs. Nothing unusual about the source of the food, just gross to modern, urban sensibilities.

Many of my high school friends were from Southeast Asia, so I got to sample some interesting foods their moms prepared. They also introduced me to obscure restaurants in Vancouver's chinatown where the asian food was authentic. None of the food I tried was of the caliber described in the article Vox linked to, but more along the lines of grandpa's preference for less-popular body parts of common animals -- tripe, eyeballs, feet. Still, you gotta wonder if there were specialties on the menu that I missed, since they usually weren't in English. One friend claimed he ate dog at one of these places, so there were probably a few.

Blogger tz September 17, 2012 3:21 PM  

Yes, we should all eat pot roast, shepherd's pie and just those things native to Brittian before the arrival of potatos, indian corn, and coffee.

Perhaps too many Korean eateries affecting the feral cat population?

Pork is non-kosher, but commonly eaten in the west, but mutton is kosher, but rarely served.

Then there's sushi. But calamari is itialian.

For me, if it doesn't have parasites and isn't seafood, and can and is properly cooked, I'm open to it.

The last two cases of dyspepsia were from chicken and common berries.

Anonymous YIH September 17, 2012 3:22 PM  

Italy has it's own sick and twisted food: Casu marzu.

Anonymous Wendy September 17, 2012 3:47 PM  

Now this is interesting:

Currently, the EU ban has been circumvented by means of another EU regulation. Casu marzu has been declared a "traditional" food (it has been made in the same manner for more than 25 years, and the recipe is thousands of years old) and it is therefore exempt from ordinary food hygiene regulations. The traditional method of making the cheese is explained by an official paper of the local government.

So if enough regulations are passed, maybe they'll all cancel each other out?

Headcheese, duck blood soup...every culture has it's mmm, special foods.

Anonymous Eagle Man September 17, 2012 3:54 PM  

"...first you gotta cut off the head and the tail, and then you gut it. Then it's all a matter of the sauce. You don't just plop down a rodent on a plate and say here's your river rat would you like red wine or white with 'em. Not that there's any wine around here anyway."

Blogger Spacebunny September 17, 2012 3:56 PM  

Dump some Marmite on the rat and you might have edible Marmite.

There is nothing you could add to Marmite to make it edible. Nothing.

Blogger JDC September 17, 2012 3:57 PM  

This comment has been removed by the author.

Anonymous John Spartan (not necessarily from Sparta) September 17, 2012 3:59 PM  

Este carne es de rata. [This meat is from rats]
"Rat? This is a rat burger?"
"Not bad! Matter of fact this is the best burger I've had in years!"

Anonymous stevev September 17, 2012 4:12 PM  

how about emulsified, sun-hardened whale vomit being used for a base in perfumes?

Anonymous Scintan September 17, 2012 4:14 PM  

I find it difficult to agree this line of argument when I'd be perfectly willing to partake of certain contraband food items if I moved for a foreign land.

It's a food, not a propensity for beheading.

Blogger JDC September 17, 2012 4:15 PM  

Rats can't be any worse than this


Anonymous rycamor September 17, 2012 4:24 PM  

This collision with the 3rd world is going to be interesting in the finicky USA, where most people are horrified to find that ANY food contains bacteria. We have two extremes at work: on the one side the industrial, chemically-controlled, genetically modified, over-sterile food system with carefully managed parameters whose overlords would love to close down every organic farm and private garden in the country, while on the other side we have the chaos and squalor of 3rd-world food preparation and unverified food sources, with little thought given to sanitary conditions. I wonder how that will play out as the two sides bring their forces to bear.

Anonymous rycamor September 17, 2012 4:38 PM  

JDC September 17, 2012 4:15 PM

Rats can't be any worse than this.


"Made with Real Cheese"

The fact that this sort of thing even needs to be said...

says it all.

Anonymous No_Limit_Bubba™ September 17, 2012 4:42 PM  

A Caddyshack link and a Freejack quote in the same thread.

Awesome.

Anonymous E. PERLINE September 17, 2012 5:37 PM  

Got some guffaws out of this topic.

Vegetables such as onions, garlic, etc. are roots and a plant doesn't want its roots eaten so it makes them somewhat toxic to animals. That's precisely why humans eat them.

The first part of prey that a predator gos for are the organs, not the muscle meats.

You history buffs will remember reading that in the whole history of ancient Rome their food was cooked with a sauce made of rotten fish, and saucemakers were proud of their recipes.

I guess it's what we get used to.

Anonymous George September 17, 2012 5:39 PM  

Anyone remember the 60s and much of the 70s when "ethnic" food meant Italian, French, bad Mexican and common Chinese?

One great thing about the new wave of immigration to the U.S. is the proliferation of great, authentic ethnic food from Ethiopian, Thai and Central American to the range of distinct Asian cuisines, Indian and of course the huge increase in quality restaurants devoted to French, Italian and Spanish.

Anonymous Noah B. September 17, 2012 5:45 PM  

"The first part of prey that a predator gos for are the organs, not the muscle meats."

And the brains -- don't forget the brains.

Anonymous stg58 September 17, 2012 5:49 PM  

I'll take a strawberry tart, without so much rat in it.

Anonymous Angel September 17, 2012 6:21 PM  

It is almost as if there was a point, no less a design, in parts of the Old Testament of the Bible.

Blogger mmaier2112 September 17, 2012 6:29 PM  

No_Limit_Bubba™ September 17, 2012 4:42 PM SAID:

"A Caddyshack link and a Freejack quote in the same thread.

Awesome."

Turn in your Man Card.

That was Demolition Man.

Blogger Carnivore September 17, 2012 7:30 PM  

"but their cleanliness practices are often below standard"

Speaking of which... (note - the video may be "uncomfortable")

http://www.cnn.com/video/?hpt=hp_t3#/video/world/2012/09/17/pkg-udas-india-open-toilets.cnn

Don't walk down the train tracks - check.

Anonymous Holla September 17, 2012 8:04 PM  

European and American train toilets operated the same way until very recently. Imagine some European trains still do.

Anonymous JohnS September 17, 2012 8:27 PM  

What happens when they start importing live vermin? Eco-catastrophe.

Libs should be outraged.


Dat's raciss!

Blogger Carnivore September 17, 2012 9:28 PM  

@Holla "European and American train toilets operated the same way until very recently. Imagine some European trains still do."

Clearly, you didn't watch the video. It has nothing to do with toilets on trains.

Anonymous VryeDenker September 18, 2012 5:09 AM  

"And I don't think that the English, world-renown for having the absolute
worst cuisine, have any high culinary ground to stand on."

Donkey steak and blood pudding, anyone?

Anonymous VryeDenker September 18, 2012 5:11 AM  

"I'll take a strawberry tart, without so much rat in it."

You can't spell "tart" without a backwards "rat".

Anonymous Rantor September 18, 2012 6:33 AM  

The first place I saw donkey on the menu was in Bergamo, not far from VD's Northern Italian digs...

Blogger Spacebunny September 18, 2012 8:08 AM  

Meh, it's usually puledro (the veal of the horse world)or cavallo, not asino on the menu. But the grocery stores carry a much more diverse selection of meat than the US. Horse, rabbit, cinghiale (wild boar - very yummy, seen almost exclusively in the autumn), bison, goat, deer, various fowl, as well as your standard lamb, beef, pork, chicken, turkey.

Anonymous Mrs. Pilgrim September 18, 2012 8:40 AM  

@ No Limit Bubba: I heard a different version of that one.

See, a rancher was entertaining a guest from France, and took him to one of those restaurants. The Frenchman, ever curious about the food on offer around him, inquired as to what these "calf fries" were. The rancher told him, and after a little further discussion, they set about looking over the menu.

After they placed their order, the rancher had to go to the restroom. When he came back, his friend was gone.

"Oh, yeah, he upped and peeled on outta here," the waiter said when asked. "Acted like he'd seen a ghost. Never seen someone so scared in my life."

"What happened?" the rancher asked.

"I don't know, but it was while the table right here was placing their order."

Just then, the next table received their order, and their waiter rattled it off as he placed the plates. "All right, you had the 12-oz. sirloin with French fries..."

Anonymous Holla September 18, 2012 9:36 AM  

@ Carnivore:

Does it matter if the shit on the tracks falls from a train or directly from a butt?

Anonymous kman September 18, 2012 10:49 AM  

Man: You sit here, dear.
Wife: All right.
Man: Morning!
Waitress: Morning!
Man: Well, what've you got?
Waitress: Well, there's egg and bacon; egg sausage and bacon; egg and rat; egg bacon and rat; egg bacon sausage and rat; rat bacon sausage and rat; rat egg rat rat bacon and rat; rat sausage rat rat bacon rat tomato and rat;
Ghanans: rat rat rat rat...
Waitress: ...rat rat rat egg and rat; rat rat rat rat rat rat baked beans rat rat rat...
Ghanans: rat! Lovely rat! Lovely rat!
Waitress: ...or Lobster Thermidor a Crevette with a mornay sauce served in a Provencale manner with shallots and aubergines garnished with truffle pate, brandy and with a fried egg on top and rat.
Wife: Have you got anything without rat?
Waitress: Well, there's rat egg sausage and rat, that's not got much rat in it.
Wife: I don't want ANY rat!
Man: Why can't she have egg bacon rat and sausage?
Wife: THAT'S got rat in it!
Man: Hasn't got as much rat in it as rat egg sausage and rat, has it?
Ghanans: rat rat rat rat... (Crescendo through next few lines...)
Wife: Could you do the egg bacon rat and sausage without the rat then?
Waitress: Urgghh!

Blogger Carnivore September 18, 2012 6:48 PM  

@Holla

Yes, it does, if one considers, what shall we call it - dump density? A random deposit out of a moving train along miles of track is not the same as residents of a slum using the same short stretch of track every day.

Anonymous No_Limit_Bubba™ September 18, 2012 9:59 PM  

@mmaier2012:
I was referring to the "Eagle Man" post...not "John Sparta" a couple posts below it.

But hey:

Caddyshack,Freejack and Demolition man...
all in the same thread--even somewhat on topic-----

AWESOME!

Blogger CR106 September 24, 2012 4:18 PM  

Probably a dead comment string, but I wanted to make Vox aware of this link, which dovetails nicely with his thoughts on immigration.

http://gatesofvienna.blogspot.com/2012/09/why-islam-does-not-belong-in-western.html?spref=tw

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