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Saturday, October 06, 2012

The decline of human capability

Bruce Charlton posits a dark possibility:
I suspect that human capability reached its peak or plateau around 1965-75 – at the time of the Apollo moon landings – and has been declining ever since.  This may sound bizarre or just plain false, but the argument is simple. That landing of men on the moon and bringing them back alive was the supreme achievement of human capability, the most difficult problem ever solved by humans. 40 years ago we could do it – repeatedly – but since then we have *not* been to the moon, and I suggest the real reason we have not been to the moon since 1972 is that we cannot any longer do it. Humans have lost the capability.

Of course, the standard line is that humans stopped going to the moon only because we no longer *wanted* to go to the moon, or could not afford to, or something…– but I am suggesting that all this is BS, merely excuses for not doing something which we *cannot* do.

It is as if an eighty year old ex-professional-cyclist was to claim that the reason he had stopped competing in the Tour de France was that he had now had found better ways to spend his time and money. It may be true; but does not disguise the fact that an 80 year old could not compete in international cycling races even if he wanted to.
As true as this rings, I think Charlton is mistaking the decline of the West for the decline of humanity in general.  While our generation is the first in many generations to be less wealthy than its predecessors, while I am without question less generally capable than my father, and while it is easy to imagine most of the idiocracy starving or descending into savagery about one month after the system breaks down, all of these things only apply to the West.

Unlike the West, the East has not lost its values.  Even the Middle East may hope to see an imperialist renaissance of sorts once the New Caliphate is constructed and it continues the expansionary phase that began back in the 1950s.  But as for the USA, it is important to keep in mind that Ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, and the medieval caliphates all saw a significant decline from their technological heights.  It would not be surprising, therefore, if 1972 was one day seen as the peak of America. 

Especially given that 1973 marked the point at which real wages began declining as the increase of women and immigrants into the workplace finally outpaced the exit of older white men from it.  There is no singular cause of societal decline, but it increasingly appears obvious that the secular equalitarian ethic that replaced the traditional Protestant one over the course of the 20th century was one of the more important factors.  Certainly, we have not seen the unleashing of human potential and capability that was repeatedly promised by its progressive advocates.

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77 Comments:

Blogger A October 06, 2012 7:50 AM  

I guess Mr. Charlton doesn't think anything of the Mars rover projects since humans weren't landed on the Red Planet, but then again, that is partially because we no longer need humans to conduct such missions as robotics has increased in sophistication.

Anonymous Rantor October 06, 2012 7:57 AM  

I place the blame squarely at thee feet of our political elites who have bought into a one world dream and limited our progress through such efforts as the EPA, established by Nixon, and the elevation of the Dept of Education to a cabinet level post by Carter. Reagen at least talked about rolling these things back and was supposedly stopped by Tip Oneal and the Dems. No one else has even tried. The supposed oil-men Bush 1 and 2 not only failed to seriously expand US oil production, they signed orders limiting oil drilling along the coasts and failed to expand and build new refineries. The current president is using the EPA to destroy the coal industry and seriously cut electrical production. Without more energy, there will be no expansion of manufacturing. The whole AGW myth is further used to slow expansion of industry in America while China expands coal production and use at an almost exponential rate.

The only way to reverse this is to reeducate about 20% of the country so they support economic growth, energy production and expanding manufacturing in a reasonably clean way. Short of that I fear you are right, so long as TPTB use the EPA and education system to destroy US wealth and productivity we are doomed to a less prosperous future.

Anonymous OhioStater October 06, 2012 7:59 AM  

There are several kinds of intelligence: abstract, practical and emotional.

The abstract probably peaked near the birth of Christ when men like Aristotle, Socrates and Plato were relatively commonplace. You have to remember the Roman Empire wasn't large, at least by modern population standards and yet had three of the greatest minds. This class of men also wrote the Bible which has such amazing clarity into human nature that it can explain why people do what they do, and the downsides, even if the activity is completely confined to a modern platform like Twitter. In addition to this, they built aqueducts and structures like the Parthenon and the Colosseum, structures still standing today.

Practical intelligence probably peaked with the moon landing. The Romans couldn't do that, yet would could probably find a way to build the Parthenon. The men of 1965 couldn't envision the Parthenon, look at crappy 1960s architecture for proof, but they could rebuild it once they saw it.

I think we have yet to hit a peak in emotional intelligence. Our main problem today is everyone wants to be a CEO, but no one wants to be an engineer 7 status levels down. Getting a picture onto TMZ is a greater sense of accomplishment than winning the Nobel prize. It used to be you needed a large amount of actual accomplishment to achieve immortality, but all you need now is a smile, a sex tape, or some Gangnam style quirk that helps you cut to the front of the line.

Anonymous CrisisEraDynamo October 06, 2012 7:59 AM  

I challenge that assumption.

In 1972, we did not have cellphones, super-powerful home computers, or the Internet. Indeed, the Internet was a technological breakthrough all its own, upending both the media and retail business models in a stroke, and revolutionizing manufacturing by making robots easier to program and operate.

And the biotech revolution is just around the corner: anti-aging, genetic engineering, the whole nine yards.

We may not be putting humans in space, but we are advancing technologically. Besides, for right now space exploration is better to do using robots.

Anonymous Kickass October 06, 2012 8:00 AM  

The whole moon landing situation has never made sense. No good reason given yet for not going back. Agreed the decline is unique and not general. Americans consider txting and gaming and even air guitar skills. Terrifying when you consider what little Laura Ingalls knew how to do by the time she was eight.

Blogger tz October 06, 2012 8:03 AM  

We cannot today build a Cathedral. Tall buildings, yes. But nothing like Notre Dame. It took a lifetime or longer from the foundation to the completion.

We still cannot today recreate the mortar used in building the Coliseum.

The moon landings were a decade from Mercury, through Gemini, and even the first half of the Apollo missions didn't land on the moon.

Could we do things today? It requires putting a noble, honorable, and higher goal first, and having patience and fortitude.

Nor is it very clear the peak was "back then" (or even earlier like the early 1900's that saw the Panama Canal, Radio, the Automobile, etc.). Prechter would easily see this as 3 of 3, 5 of 3, v.s the end of the 5th wave.

The level of actual cooperation is both greater and spreading. The smartphone is an achievement of tens of thousands (which Apple is doing their best to destroy with the Lawyers). Now we are getting 3D printers. We are connected by the internet and can access information - in the futuristic shows we had videophones and flying cars, We have the former but even more access to a thousand libraries at our fingertips (as to whether the books are worth reading or trashy novels is a different issue). Familiarity breeds contempt, so being to phone another continent for pennies, on a wireless headset, while the GPS guides you around traffic, and your latest document is there for editing, you can look back with nostalgia at the great achievements of those who came before. Sort of like looking around and not seeing God's creation and that it had to be created. Familiarity breeds contempt.

Asia might have some values intact, but Government ruins all it touches. China has a one-child policy, and Japan's demographics have copied them voluntarily. Bubbles and debt - do you honor your elders when they have eliminated your siblings? Can you even support them? There was Yue-yue, the two year old run over by the van in the video... Fukushima that copied the safety Hubris from Chernobyl. Sony that gave us the Walkman is disappearing. India is now importing GM grains bankrupting their farmers (who do things like commit suicide). I'm not so sure that the East will fare any better as they would have to return to their foundational values. Aborted children do not honor ancestors.

Hypocrisy is the compliment vice pays to virtue, but it also tends to be most disturbed by the unintentional mockery of those practicing something either better or worse. Christendom has accepted sex is for pleasure, with procreation as strictly optional but go ballistic over the LGBTs. And they watch as their civilization declines while Muslims simply persist in sticking to their civilization. Yes, civilization. Spain wasn't all bad under their rule. I'm not sure if it is between the Eurocrats and a new Caliphate that Iberia might not be more free and prosperous, and undergo far less suffering under the latter. Brothel v.s. burkah on a national level.

But as I and others have noted, only God can save us and that will take yet another Great Awakening. Hearts that are right will enable heads to achieve greatness. Hearts that aren't use their heads to achieve baseness.

Anonymous damaged justice October 06, 2012 8:09 AM  

http://blog.jim.com/economics/decline-of-the-west.html

"The last man on the moon left in 1972. The tallest building in the united states was finished in 1974...

"The simplest explanation for the fact that western research seems to have fallen off a cliff is that we are now reaching the point where hating dead white males is a more important academic qualification than anything else."

http://blog.jim.com/economics/technological-decay.html

"...technology in the west peaked in 1970, Tallest building 1972, coolest muscle cars, last man left the moon, though it continues to advance in some other parts of the world."

Anonymous Kyle In Japan October 06, 2012 8:22 AM  

This is the rah-rah-go-Japan optimist in me speaking, but I think that whatever crises come will ultimately end up causing Japan to bounce back from their 10-20 year stagnation.

Japan's biggest problem is demographics, but unlike other countries in the West it's not an issue of immigration messing up demographics, it's just a low birthrate. Problematic, sure, but it's something that can change quickly given the right... motivation.

Anonymous Johnycomelately October 06, 2012 8:41 AM  

Considering the missing trillions gone to black ops projects, I wouldn't be surprised to find that we have already been to Mars trying to restart that damn turbinium reactor.

Anonymous The Great Martini October 06, 2012 8:53 AM  

No, I don't buy this at all, for a number of reasons. The reason we stopped going to the moon was because the political will to do so evaporated pretty soon after JFK's commandment to do so was fulfilled and the Soviet competition was defeated. Secondly, the space shuttle was a technical triumph that exceeded the Apollo spacecraft, even though it wasn't quite as spectacular. The Apollo mission was always technically rather "iffy" anyway. Armstrong himself admitted that successfully landing on the moon and getting back was at best a 50/50 proposition. It was always a technological over-extension that was going to start handing us failures once n=the number of missions went up. NASA wisely quit while it was ahead. Lastly, even shortly after the Apollo missions ended, many experts didn't think we would return to the moon for at least a hundred years, mostly due to political realism, but also because Apollo had always been a technical hotdogging.

OpenID ampontan October 06, 2012 9:09 AM  

Charlton misses it entirely and VD doesn't do much better:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-19347120

An e-mail from a friend in England, with whom I discussed this article:

"I have in my possession the ability to make films with exactly the same special effects that are used in Hollywood… sub 3000 GBP ( I Paid 500+ but I got 80 per-cent user discount)… the only thing is it takes longer, all down to processor power …

"In Hollywood they have what is known as render farms, and I have built a render farm for a client a few years back. So the only difference with me and Hollywood is time (= processor power)."

Then there are the advanced surgical techniques in use right now, and really, more fields than I could possibly list.
*****

"This is the rah-rah-go-Japan optimist in me speaking, but I think that whatever crises come will ultimately end up causing Japan to bounce back from their 10-20 year stagnation."

The process has already started.

Anonymous anon123 October 06, 2012 9:14 AM  

There seemed to be a been-there-done-that feeling with Appllo so priorities changed to Mars ( seemingly very successful so far), Hubble which still is successful, and various deep space projects. All this is very costly. It also seems that the trend is to manless missions because advancements technological allow more flexibility in parameters of missions. And that has given us manless drones buzzing over our heads so it can't be all bad.

Anonymous Godfrey October 06, 2012 9:17 AM  

Come now, the West is at its peak! Look at all the modern steps foward like sodomy and infanticide just to name a couple. Is this not proof positive of our progress? While our ancestors merely contemplated the stars, we contemplate our anus!


Anonymous Salt October 06, 2012 9:18 AM  

You could see the exit sign via Hollywood too. I posit the decline was foretold by the death of Walt Disney.

Blogger James Dixon October 06, 2012 9:20 AM  

> t's just a low birthrate. Problematic, sure, but it's something that can change quickly given the right... motivation.

That assumes that it's not an environmental issue of some kind, which is not a given. Birth rates have stagnated or even fallen all over the developed world.

And yes folks, our technology is still getting better, but that completely misses the point Vox is making. What are we doing with it?

Blogger Rantor October 06, 2012 9:39 AM  

As far as space exploration goes, it increasingly looks like the rich will lead the way. With Branson and others building commercial capability that includes heavy lift. I actually prefer the commercialization of space over government monopoly, even if the first phase is taking rich people to join the 20 mile high club. We already have seen the first commercial test mission to the space station and they are working to field a 7 passenger capsule for that rocket. Some of that is NASA funded, some private investment. Sophisticated technologies, such as electronics and lightweight materials, are making this possible.

Despite all of this activity by the rich, the oligarchics, there remains an effort to deny the US of progress in exploiting energy and therefore pushing for the decline of the US as a dominate economic power. To overcome this we need to abolish the Departments of Education and Energy and the EPA. Push all education back to the states. Allow the energy sector to be run by energy companies and regulated by the states. We need the states to set their own energy, education and environmental laws that they may enforce and rid ourselves of these Federal hindrances.

Yes, I know, I am a Constitutional Conservative suffering from Libertarian fanstasies.

Blogger JACIII October 06, 2012 9:50 AM  

Note how neatly this fits with the waning of the baby boomers. As usual, the world began when their navel gazing asses arrived and is ending as they disappear.

Typical.

Anonymous The One October 06, 2012 10:21 AM  

Birth Control. A child born to a 30yr old woman is probably genetically less capable then a if the child was born to the same woman at 25.

Anonymous The One October 06, 2012 10:29 AM  

Pill came out in the 60's, first declining humans appeared in the 80's.

Anonymous Apeman October 06, 2012 10:43 AM  

Kyle,

I don't know off hand of any nation that survived the problem of not wanting to reproduce. It destroyed the Spartans, it destroyed the ruling Roman upper classes. No nation that I am aware of rediscovered the desire to have babies in time to save themselves. And if you think think that being an island will give Japan the time they need to recover, go take a trip and meet the original inhabitants of Japan.

But lets ignore all that. Let us just look at modern day Japan. You talk about a funk of 10 to 20 years that Japan needs to recover from. Demographically, this is false. Japan dropped below replacement total fertility rate in 1975 and went in free fall from there. In 1997 Japan dropped below 1.4 and it has never managed to get above that. The only reason it took so long for Japan's population to start dropping is that for a while increase in how long people lived were covering up for the birth short fall. As I am sure you know, that is no longer the case.

Now, given your optimism about Japan, I am not sure you know what total fertility rate means. Crudely, it measure the number of live births against the number of fertile females. In Japan (and a few other countries) this measure disguises the true extent of the problem). Simply put, most Japaneses females are no longer fertile so the number of live births as a percentage of the population as a whole is far lower than nations that seem to have a comparable total fertility rate.

The bottom line is that what Japan will do in the far future is abstract debate without much meaning. But the fact that Japan will not recover in your life time is a mathematical fact (assuming no immigration).

Anonymous cherub's revenge October 06, 2012 10:44 AM  

And the biotech revolution is just around the corner: anti-aging, genetic engineering, the whole nine yards.

In a world where the West is flooded with brown and black hordes? I don't think so.

Blogger TontoBubbaGoldstein October 06, 2012 10:45 AM  

When many people hit 45 to 50, often they start thinking of the time period of their youth as better than it is now. My folks view the 50's this way. Even many folks who grew up in the depression years,may fondly remember the society they grew up in.

Get off my lawn, you worthless young whippersnappers!

Anonymous cherub's revenge October 06, 2012 10:56 AM  

Charlton misses it entirely and VD doesn't do much better:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-19347120


There is also an independent African Maker Faire, and this is a continent where the maker movement can have real impact thinks Mr Dougherty.

"They are realising that they don't need things that a large Western company has. In the past they have got hand-me-downs from the West which are difficult for them to maintain or repair," he said.

Instead they can make their own devices, custom-made for medical, communication, farming or other needs.


Oh sure they can. Can't so much as maintain a John Deere A but they'll be fabbing their own micro-medical devices.

The rest of the article is just more technobabble about how "revolutionary" "micro-manufacturing" is, which is essentially just small shop tool and die and millwrights but with plastic.

Blogger TontoBubbaGoldstein October 06, 2012 10:57 AM  

Of course there is little hope for the near future, now. Our (Europe and the US) government/societal system is not maintainable. It can only end in high inflation, world war, governmental/societal collapse or a combination of these. Since *everyone* has nukes these days, WWIII may not wind up as good for the US (and western Europe and Japan, for that matter) as the last one did. I'm getting a 1914 vibe …except with nukes.

Have a nice day!

Anonymous Vic October 06, 2012 10:57 AM  

Why on earth would we want to return to the moon? Nothing is there. Not even cheese.

Anonymous Apeman October 06, 2012 10:59 AM  

Kyle,

I don't know off hand of any nation that survived the problem of not wanting to reproduce. It destroyed the Spartans, it destroyed the ruling Roman upper classes. No nation that I am aware of rediscovered the desire to have babies in time to save themselves. And if you think think that being an island will give Japan the time they need to recover, go take a trip and meet the original inhabitants of Japan.

But lets ignore all that. Let us just look at modern day Japan. You talk about a funk of 10 to 20 years that Japan needs to recover from. Demographically, this is false. Japan dropped below replacement total fertility rate in 1975 and went in free fall from there. In 1997 Japan dropped below 1.4 and it has never managed to get above that. The only reason it took so long for Japan's population to start dropping is that for a while increase in how long people lived were covering up for the birth short fall. As I am sure you know, that is no longer the case.

Now, given your optimism about Japan, I am not sure you know what total fertility rate means. Crudely, it measure the number of live births against the number of fertile females. In Japan (and a few other countries) this measure disguises the true extent of the problem). Simply put, most Japaneses females are no longer fertile so the number of live births as a percentage of the population as a whole is far lower than nations that seem to have a comparable total fertility rate.

The bottom line is that what Japan will do in the far future is abstract debate without much meaning. But the fact that Japan will not recover in your life time is a mathematical fact (assuming no immigration).

Anonymous Apeman October 06, 2012 11:03 AM  

Arggh, the double post was a result of a copy and past and not paying attention. I need to go to bed.

What was supposed to be in the second post was an illustration of how Japan's birth rate has dropped in half since the 70's and how over 1 in 5 Japaneses woman is over the age of 65. Demographically, the future has already happened.

Anonymous Orville October 06, 2012 11:30 AM  

Going back to the moon is not a good example for this theory. Commercial space is in it's nascent stage, and once there is a sound economic reason to go back to the moon it will be done. As it stands right now SpaceX, who is launching again Sunday night to the ISS (I hope my comment doesn't jinx the shot), has a capable launch and return system that is way cheaper than what Big Aerospace has. They are sucking up a lot of sat launch business because of their price point.

I believe there is one other cause equal to the cultural collapse, and that is the general tendency of systems to fail once they reach a certain stage of complexity.

In a simpler time, one could be Heinlein's renaissance man, who had a mastery of a number of necessary survival skills. Our societal system today is so complex that specialization is required, and extremely few can be the renaissance man who is master of his domain.

Decentralizing and simplifying doesn't mean becoming a Luddite, but it does mean finding ways to insulate from failures in the larger system.

I've given this some amount of thought as to how to simplify and decentralize as part of preparing for when the "system" breaks and reorganizes at a simpler level.

Anonymous Cat McClusky October 06, 2012 11:31 AM  

Endeavors such as the moon landing required technological know-how and innovation, time and energy investment, a sense of childlike excitement and awe, and...courage.

Not the kind of courage that allows one to reveal his inner emotional struggles in a support group or the "courage" to walk away from a fight, but real John Wayne style, the Right Stuff, ball swinging, life risking grit.

Now excuse me, I've got a sensitivity lecture to attend.

Anonymous jack October 06, 2012 11:32 AM  

Kickass October 06, 2012 8:00 AM

The whole moon landing situation has never made sense. No good reason given yet for not going back.

There is some compelling evidence, perhaps a large amount of it, that folks from other star systems have bases on the moon. Both on the Earth facing side and the so called dark side.

An interesting read would be NASA Tech. report R277, available on line in various places. Particular attention might be directed to the multiple references to strange anomalies surrounding the craters Aristratis and Plato. [Forgive my probably misspelling of Aristratis]. Then consider what Neal Armstrong was supposed to have said about Aristratis as he observed it while on the moon. Further consideration might be given to the interesting 'glows' seen from those two craters. Colors that have no explanation for a dead body such as the moon. A blue glow that could be associated with nuclear or more probable fusion reactors. Remember that the moon has an abundance of helium 3, a substance that seems to figure prominently in the fusion process.

If 'they' are there the word may have been passed on to keep out.

Just saying....

Anonymous Redneck Joe October 06, 2012 11:36 AM  

My father was a medical doctor in the suburbs of NJ, born to poor Polish immigrants in Camden. He raised me with hopes that I would accomplish more than he did. I am an RF engineering consultant – work on average 6 months per year by choice and *very* happily live in a cabin on 60 acres I bought for $90,000 in a poor county in the hills of TN. I have zero desire to have anything to do with the society in which I grew up – bitchy women, debt, consumerism. There is no discernible difference in our intellectual abilities. I truly do not care to achieve societal status, because I hold the society in complete disdain.
The married suburban engineers I meet in my travels - with the car payments, mortgages, credit card swiping wives, and kids in public schools - are almost universally envious of my life. Not bragging, because it was much easier to build my life than it was to build theirs. Just pointing out that my father never considered partially dropping out. The option just wasn’t on the table culturally in 1970 – everyone would have thought he was nuts. Today these people think I am a visionary, ask interested questions about my life, and often make comments along the lines of “you’ve got it made.” They don’t like where they are, despite being in the upper 5% in income and having accomplished everything society directed them to do. Western culture discourages achievement. Toeing the line in general creates deeper and deeper problems and entanglements rather than bringing security, peace, and happiness. I saw it 15 years ago and said it wasn’t for me.
And the women I associate with are *much* more appreciative, pleasant, and fun that the suburban wives.
So there’s one anecdote of a guy who could be “doing more” but simply doesn’t see the reason.
FWIW.

Blogger Bob Wallace October 06, 2012 11:46 AM  

We still can learn to build Hal 9000 or Skynet.

Blogger Logos October 06, 2012 11:47 AM  

Success always contains the seeds of its own destruction. In the case of human society, those seeds are the people born into wealth and plenty, who take those miracles as a given. Leftism sprouts from these seeds and identifies any lingering want or injustice as intolerable, demanding that political force be used to eradicate them. After that it is only a matter of time until the foundations of success collapse.

Like a great star that begins processing iron at its core, a great society that begins processing leftists at its core is doomed.

Anonymous Noah B. October 06, 2012 11:50 AM  

"Why on earth would we want to return to the moon?"

Helium-3.

Anonymous DonReynolds October 06, 2012 11:55 AM  

Sjoberg wrote an interesting note about the existence of an 800 year cycle of civilization, with 300 years of rapid urbanization followed by 500 years of Dark Ages. Our present period of rapid urbanization began in about 1750 and has about run it's course. What follows is five centuries of rural life, a return to feudalism (which is based on land ownership), and a loss of knowledge in absolute terms. Feudalism is merely the political reality of rural existence. Knowledge and learning, what there is of it, will be confined to monastic poles and the guilds.

This 800 year cycle is difficult to explain except in terms of human experience the past few thousand years. I am glad I will not live long enough to see the beginning of the Dark Ages, which has always been given to disappointment and loss. I will not miss a thing worth seeing. Society will descend into the chaos of competing savage gangs led by warlords (disguised as royalty) and the resurgence of religious fevor of one kind or another.

The decline of human ability is part of the end of the 300 years of rapid urbanization and entirely expected, along with declining fertility, and increasing wars, famine, disease and human desperation....especially on the part of tyrants and their greedy associates.

Anonymous Kickass October 06, 2012 12:01 PM  

Thanks Jack, an interesting rabbit hole that one. I subscribe to an onion view of the dimensions of this life, God is kind to reveal the layers slowly.

By the way, them findind the angel statue on the moon and bringing it back always was very interesting to me. No one ever talks about it though.

Anonymous Kickass October 06, 2012 12:01 PM  

Thanks Jack, an interesting rabbit hole that one. I subscribe to an onion view of the dimensions of this life, God is kind to reveal the layers slowly.

By the way, them findind the angel statue on the moon and bringing it back always was very interesting to me. No one ever talks about it though.

Anonymous Kickass October 06, 2012 12:05 PM  

Sorry about the double post and that should be "finding".

Anonymous DonReynolds October 06, 2012 12:13 PM  

Redneck Joe is apparently the personification of the return to rural life. He may have the benefit of a good technical education, which enables him to thrive as an RF engineering consultant, but his children and their children, etc will assimilate and become part of the rural landscape. We have seen this sort of thing in the recent past on the frontier of the USA. Many of the settlers and pioneers were from educated and skilled people, who raised their children in the wilderness the best they could, but could not impart ALL that they knew in isolation. After a few generations, the knowledge and ability that pioneered the frontier was lost along the way. The farther west you travel in this country, one of things you notice is misspelling and respelling of place names and family names fairly common in the east. Gallatin Tennessee (named after Albert Gallatin) becomes Galatyn Texas. Reynolds becomes Raynolds and Renolds and Renold. Campbell becomes Cammel and Campbull and Kammel.

Anonymous CatDog October 06, 2012 12:18 PM  

The decline in SAT scores among whites that Monkey Boy mentioned in another thread could correlate with a general decline in IQ amongst whites. The baby boom period has generally been showing to have been a more Catholic phenomena that Protestant, so could been that be a factor. We know the Irish for instance, who tend to be Catholic, have the lowest IQ's among white ethnic groups and have done for a long time, so dumber whites may have outbreeded the smarter ones.

Blogger JDC October 06, 2012 12:18 PM  

My grandfather could fix anything (cars, small engines, electrical problems in the house, plumbing, broken tiles, etc.), and could build almost anything (he built the foundation for my parents home addition as well as the structure, he regularly built decks, birdhouses, outhouses (for our cabin).

My father was good - but certainly not on the level of grandpa. I am good, but certainly not on the level of my father. My sneaking suspicion is that our relative prosperity as a country has contributed to this. We pay people to do things today, that 40 years ago people did themselves. Why? Because we have the money and don't have the time. This has led many to lose basic skills - carpentry, engine repair...

When and if the Zombie apocalypse happens - people will find themselves in a position where they will have to make do for themselves. If the pattern continues, than maybe this generation will achieve an exponential increase in abilities based on the necessity of need. Or...as someone posited, we'll just have robots and computers handle everything while we wait to be ground up into food for our Muslim/Chinese/Extraterrestrial/Demonic overlords.

Gotta go now - I have to figure out how to repair a leak in my roof (I have a sneaking suspicion that my chimney is leaking), and will type in "roof repair" into google and see what I can learn.

Anonymous PA October 06, 2012 12:21 PM  

live in a cabin on 60 acres I bought for $90,000 in a poor county in the hills of TN

Have you been able to make this lifestyle attractie to a woman and made children with her? If yes, you rock. If not, you have simply checked out. I don't mean this as an insult. It's easy to drop out in one for or anthoer; yours happens to include a beautiful andscape.

Your father had you. Do you have your own descendants?

Blogger RobertT October 06, 2012 12:40 PM  

You are probably correct about the U.S., but I have long taken my guidance in this from C.S. Lewis when one of the kids stuck a piece of metal into the ground in Narnia and it grew into a lamppost. The idea is that the farther we get from the creation event, the dumber we get. I have also found it interesting that Chaucer and other writers, Shakespeare for instance, write for a much better educated audience than is generally the case today. Does that mean that the run of the mill idiot in those days was as bright as the educated classes today? All the other achievements, like space travel for instance, required the adding of knowledge upon knowledge that apparently took thousands of years to accumulate. For whatever it's worth, that's my take.

Anonymous Pixal October 06, 2012 12:56 PM  

I've been watching this play out a large data center. Out of 100 people about 20 have the capacity to run the whole thing. However, they receive no training and get tasked with menial work that the less capable aren't able to do, but should be reserved for entry level developers with potential. So the guys who could send us to the moon are getting dragged down by those around them. Compound that with the fact that about 10% (increasing) are immigrants from the 3rd world and it gets even worse.

Just look at a few posts at Hacker News to see what a white guy can do in a weekend.

Anonymous Pixal October 06, 2012 1:06 PM  

Whiskey has an interesting post that may dovetail into this one.

"Much of the Democratic policies are aimed at simply stopping White guys. From changing the world any more. Women and the rest WANT IT TO STOP. Largely they’ve succeeded. Underlying the HATE HATE HATE of unsexy White guy nerds (and no one does that better than White guys) is the change they bring, that make women generally losers. Suppose America transitions from a nation of Hollywood, Academia, Government, NGOs, and low-level service to manufacturing and energy extraction? How will that help women? Will they play a leading part in it, as they do Hollywood (particularly TV which is almost exclusively female in audience composition)?"

The 3d printer is one of those technological achievements that white nerds create to get around those trying to stop them. Programmers do this all the time. They aren't happy doing menial work and they will find a way to automate it.

Anonymous john October 06, 2012 1:27 PM  

Your right. We can't even build skyscrapers anymore, let alone go to the moon. We can barely build repair our streets.

Henry Ford was able to start an automobile company in the previous century. In our century car company after car company goes out of business and Tesla and Fisker piss away millions selling a handful of toy electric cars.

Anonymous Anonymous October 06, 2012 1:35 PM  

We cannot afford further manned space exploration because we are too busy funding Black Run America.

Anonymous O.C. October 06, 2012 1:37 PM  

I disagree with this. I'd posit that as individuals, by any standard of measurement you'd care to choose, our *best* people now are equal to or better than the best people of two generations ago.

Where Western Civ falls short is collectively. As a whole, we've become too pusillanimous, too risk-averse, and too content with mediocrity to rise to the heights our parents and grandparents reached.

The solution is simple. Stop denigrating individual superiority and punishing achievement. Encourage children to dare and dream big.

And shoot a member of the Association of Trial Lawyers today. It's for the children.

Blogger The Aardvark October 06, 2012 1:43 PM  

"I guess Mr. Charlton doesn't think anything of the Mars rover projects since humans weren't landed on the Red Planet, but then again, that is partially because we no longer need humans to conduct such missions as robotics has increased in sophistication." -- A

Arrant nonsense. Humans are still doing the experiments, omly by telepresence. "Curiosity" is doing its job, small experiment by small experiment, as its handlers instruct. It is nothing near to being an independent AI trundling about doing its own, following its own curiosity. We have a more sophisticated waldo.

Anonymous JCB October 06, 2012 1:50 PM  

I don't know. A few generations growing up guzzling IQ lowering fluoride water, undergoing ridiculous vaccine regimens, and eating genetically modified garbage has probably conspired to make dunces of us all.

Anonymous Jack Amok October 06, 2012 2:44 PM  

Note how neatly this fits with the waning of the baby boomers. As usual, the world began when their navel gazing asses arrived and is ending as they disappear.

Typical


Winner, Winner, Soylent Green Dinner!

Of course, the Boomers didn't send a man to the moon, they just watched it while they were tokin weed, probably thinking Armstrong and the rest were hopelessly un-cool at the time, but now look back and claim the triumph for themselves.

Hey DonReynolds, get a grip. Someone spelling their name differently than you spell yours do doesn't make them an idjit. I've worked with people from all over the US and most educated parts of the world too. It's my experience that the more "steeped in history" the place they come from is, the less capable they are. It's not that they're less intelligent, it's that they've spent their mental energy learning useless crap. The typical East Coast, old-money scion has a head full of luncheon protocol and environmental fear-mongering. What little room he had allocated to "practical" skills in his upbringing was focused on bankstering, lawyering or politiking, all various forms of grifting.

That's where the missing capability has gone. It's not inherent talent we're lacking, it's mis-prioritized skill acquisition that's killing us. We've encouraged two generations of our highest achievers to become high-class grifters instead of engineers and entrepreneurs. If there's a truth to the 800 year cycle theory, it's based in a cultural suicide borne of valuing social proof over accomplishment. Prosperous societies, living off the inertia generated by results-focused grandparents, can temporariliy afford to live the Bertie Wooster life. But if someone isn't refilling the rocket fuel tanks, the momentum will eventually bleed away.

Anonymous Brad of this Nation October 06, 2012 2:55 PM  

I'm a little surprised that everyone so far accepts the statement that we have been to the moon. If it was faked that would be the simplest explanation of why we haven't gone back, despite the exponential advancement of every other aspect of technology.

Blogger TontoBubbaGoldstein October 06, 2012 3:13 PM  

JCB: I don't know. A few generations growing up guzzling IQ lowering fluoride water, undergoing ridiculous vaccine regimens, and eating genetically modified garbage has probably conspired to make dunces of us all.




Don't call me stupid!

What was the middle part?

Anonymous Idle Spectator October 06, 2012 3:20 PM  

People keep forgetting one thing: the internet.

It is the new printing press. And looking at the historical pattern, I expect war and reform to sweep the globe like it did Europe. It's already happening.

Unlike the West, the East has not lost its values. Even the Middle East may hope to see an imperialist renaissance of sorts once the New Caliphate is constructed and it continues the expansionary phase that began back in the 1950s.

Notice the Ottoman's sacking of Constantinople by that 21-year-old sultan in 1453 tipped off the nearby Italian Renaissance. It then spread all the way up to Sweden and out to England. Nothing like a swift kick in the ol' occipital lobe to get you going.


The parallels are eerie.

Anonymous Dr. Idle Spectator, Caltech Chemistry October 06, 2012 3:33 PM  

few generations growing up guzzling IQ lowering fluoride water

Ok, enough with the fluoride bullshit please.

- Yes, mild excessive intake can cause Dental Fluorosis, which is spotting, molting, and discoloration of tooth enamel due to the effects of fluoride.
- Yes, there is some evidence of this form increasing in some parts of the United States, due to both water sources and also toothpastes.
- Yes, higher doses can cause Skeletal Fluorosis, which malforms the skeleton. Common in the third-world countries.
- Yes, fluoride can lower IQ, but that comes from high, HIGH, H-I-G-H doses. And the studies were in... China and India with contaminated drinking water.

Go forth, and embrace your electronegative fluorine. Let it tickle your enamel matrix. Let it caress and sooth your cavities. So strangely erotic, mouthing off over dental porn.

Anonymous Bohm October 06, 2012 4:00 PM  

First: The Apollo programme should be appraised in the context of the Cold War. The US still has the technology to send men to the moon, only the political will is lacking. The success of Apollo disguises the fact that it was inherently risky on multiple levels. Apollo 13 brought home how close to the wind the whole thing sailed. The odds are that if Apollo had continued to complete the full programme, astronauts -and prestige- would have been lost. The fact is, Apollo was cancelled while it was still ahead. The idea that it died due to public disinterest, inter alia, is a convenient half-truth.

Second: All human civilisation is based on two things: The supply of fresh water and the disposal of human waste. Everything else is secondary -including iPods.

Third: c.1973 was indeed when it all started to go downhill for the US middle class. All the 'solutions' expounded by the US political class - conservative or liberal - to solve this problem are just more of the same crap that caused the decline in the first place. (as well they know).

Essentially, 1973 marked the beginning of the end of a thirty year post-WW2 experiment in social capitalism. VD predicts that 'one day' 1972 will be seen as the zenith. That day came and went years ago.

Fourth: How anyone can look at the middle east today and confidently predict a New Caliphate is beyond me. The problem about ME democracy-for the West - is that Muslim populations have always been more devout than their rulers - this was especially true of the height of the old Caliphate of the Abbasids and beyond.

The more devout Muslims states become individually, a New Caliphate becomes less likely. (it's like expecting Catholics and Protestants to re-unite under a New Holy Roman Empire, ruled by the Papacy- with all the historical contradictions that implies.

Muslim political unity was attempted in the fifties under the rubric of secular Arab nationalism, driven by Nasserite socialism. It was undermined and defeated by the West, primarily by military intervention but also by encouraging Muslim fundamentalism. To this day, the West prefers this fundamentalism to a resurgence of secular Arab nationalism, which, so far, has been the only thing that even came within miles of a political unification of the Muslim world.

When VD states that the East has yet to lose its values, he is presumably referring the cosmic certainties peddled by Muslim fundamentalists. He regrets that Western secularism has compromised its own cosmic certainties. He forgets that he is still free to believe what he wants - a condition due entirely to secularism - just as he would be been back in 1972.

Anonymous Jeigh Di October 06, 2012 4:00 PM  

"C" and "D" students must receive A's and B's lest they suffer diminished self esteem, and of course there must be no failing grades. "A" and "B" students, especially boys, being bored to the point of disrupting class, must be tranquilized.

This morning on a local radio station I heard someone voicing his concern that the more intelligent students are being allowed to attend charter schools when they are needed in regular public schools.

I think I know at least part of the problem, here.

Anonymous Noah B. October 06, 2012 4:22 PM  

I look at human achievements such as the Pyramids of Egypt and the Mayan Empire, the Great Wall of China, and the Apollo program with a degree of horror. All of these achievements were the ultimate result of slave labor. In the case of the Apollo program, there was a great deal of trickery behind it, including the creation of a monetary, banking, and tax system that extorted money and resources from millions of people for the ultimate purpose of fulfilling the grandiose ambitions of a small number of the elite.

It's hard for me to get upset that the feat hasn't since been repeated.

Anonymous CatDog October 06, 2012 4:32 PM  

The Apollo program also had kidnapped German scientists that where taken from there after the war.

Anonymous rycamor October 06, 2012 4:55 PM  

Note how neatly this fits with the waning of the baby boomers. As usual, the world began when their navel gazing asses arrived and is ending as they disappear.

Typical

Winner, Winner, Soylent Green Dinner!


I laughed, I did.

Anonymous zen0's python October 06, 2012 7:14 PM  

Second: All human civilisation is based on two things: The supply of fresh water and the disposal of human waste. Everything else is secondary -including iPods.

Relevant reset:

The interior of MATTHIAS'S HOUSE. A darkened room with a very conspiratorial atmosphere. REG and STAN are seated at a table at one end of the room. FRANCIS, dressed in Activist gear — black robes and a red sash around his head — is standing by a plan on the wall. He is addressing an audience of about eight MASKED ActivistS. Their faces are partially hidden.

Francis:
We get in through the underground heating system here... up through to the main audience chamber here... and Pilate's wife's bedroom is here. Having grabbed his wife, we inform Pilate that she is in our custody and forthwith issue our demands. Any questions?
Xerxes:
What exactly are the demands?
Reg:
We're giving Pilate two days to dismantle the entire apparatus of the Roman Imperialist State and if he doesn't agree immediately we execute her.
Matthias:
Cut her head off?
Francis:
Cut all her bits off, send 'em back every hour on the hour... show him we're not to be trifled with.
Reg:
Also, we're demanding a ten foot mahogany statue of the Emperor Julius Caesar with his cock hanging out.
Stan:
What? They'll never agree to that, Reg.
Reg:
That's just a bargaining counter. And of course, we point out that they bear full responsibility when we chop her up, and... that we shall not submit to blackmail.
Omnes:
(Applause) No blackmail!
Reg:
They've bled us white, the bastards. They've taken everything we had, not just from us, from our fathers and from our fathers' fathers.
Stan:
And from our fathers' fathers' fathers.
Reg:
Yes.
Stan:
And from our fathers' fathers' fathers' fathers.
Reg:
All right, Stan. Don't labour the point. And what have they ever given us in return?
Xerxes:
The aqueduct.
Reg:
Oh yeah, yeah they gave us that. Yeah. That's true.
Masked Activist:
And the sanitation!
Stan:
Oh yes... sanitation, Reg, you remember what the city used to be like.
Reg:
All right, I'll grant you that the aqueduct and the sanitation are two things that the Romans have done...

Matthias:
And the roads...
Reg:
(sharply) Well yes obviously the roads... the roads go without saying. But apart from the aqueduct, the sanitation and the roads...
Another Masked Activist:
Irrigation...
Other Masked Voices:
Medicine... Education... Health...
Reg:
Yes... all right, fair enough...
Activist Near Front:
And the wine...
Omnes:
Oh yes! True!
Francis:
Yeah. That's something we'd really miss if the Romans left, Reg.
Masked Activist at Back:
Public baths!
Stan:
And it's safe to walk in the streets at night now.
Francis:
Yes, they certainly know how to keep order... (general nodding)... let's face it, they're the only ones who could in a place like this.

(more general murmurs of agreement)
Reg:
All right... all right... but apart from better sanitation and medicine and education and irrigation and public health and roads and a freshwater system and baths and public order... what have the Romans done for us?
Xerxes:
Brought peace!
Reg:
(very angry, he's not having a good meeting at all) What!? Oh... (scornfully) Peace, yes... shut up!

Anonymous FUBAR Nation (Ben) October 06, 2012 9:28 PM  

Nothing tops the invention of the toilet.

Anonymous scoobius dubious October 06, 2012 10:06 PM  

There's nothing on the moon that we need, except for bragging rights, and I guess also maintaining the deep-bench human capital that is necessary to do things like, ya know, landing on the moon.

But we already have the bragging rights, and these days we maintain our deep-bench human capital through lots of other means, like kooky internet computer science and Mars rovers, and even evil stuff like GM crops. Of course we also tell ourselves ridiculous lies like "Diversity is strength" and this depletes our human capital.

If non-white immigration into white countries is not decisively ended and reversed within the next generation or two in order to save the white race from malignant Jewish genocide, then the white race will simply cease to exist, and then who really cares what happens next? Whites are the only real human beings who exist among Homo sapiens sapiens. Asian insects and Jewish cancer-cells can go on cheating each other into eternity, what difference does it make? If Asian insects land on the moon, or they don't, or if stupid barking African animals continue to persist as they always do in their abominable starving savage sewage-culture, who cares? I don't worry myself about the fate of the crickets in my back yard. If white people end, then humanity ends as well, full stop. May as well start writing the history of the rings of Saturn, it means about as much.

The real purpose of the moon landing was as a propaganda arm and an R&D arm, both part of a complicated many-sided long-term scheme to defeat and abolish the evil of international Communism. That goal was achieved, at least nominally. So moon landings are just less vitally important, now that Communism is pushing daisies.

The problem is that while the ostensible surface veneer of this evil -- Communism -- was defeated, its substructural evil, a kind of persistent human poison devoted to the destruction, specifically, of Christianity and the white race, has persisted, mutated, and taken on new forms. But these persistent and pernicious forms cannot and will not be defeated by simple cosmetic tools like moon landings.

The new fight against the enemy requires new weapons. We are starting to see them in things like the spread of the internet, not just as a pastime but as the actual tool of choice for the believable dissemination of public information, and the mass decline in public trust in malignant Jew-controlled old-school media. If moon-landings could play a useful role in this fight we might see more of them, but they don't. Onward and upward -- just not to the moon, to some other figurative place that hopefully won't be quite so barren and cold.





Blogger James Dixon October 06, 2012 10:56 PM  

> Nothing tops the invention of the toilet.

Actually, yes. Indoor plumbing with hot and cold running water is one of the great achievements of history.

Anonymous cult of equality October 06, 2012 11:29 PM  

Inequity in Equity
How equity can lead to inequity for high-potential students

Camilla Person Benbow and Julian C. Stanley


"I have in my possession the ability to make films with exactly the same special effects that are used in Hollywood" "So the only difference with me and Hollywood is time (= processor power)."

NSS

ati leo tech demo

Blogger Scott October 07, 2012 12:02 AM  

52 comments in and we haven't had anyone say "But we didn't even go to the moon!" I'm disappointed (I Skimmed so I could be mistaken)

Anonymous Daybreaker October 07, 2012 12:24 AM  

Bruce Charlton is fine with chronic, massive non-White mass immigration into all White countries and only White countries, and with compulsory integration, assimilation and eventually, inevitably intermarriage. He has no problems with the genocide of White people. Indeed, he objects to anyone making the fight against that genocide their top priority, as their top priority ought to be Jesus, who has no objection to the genocide of Whites.

This is the context for Bruce Charlton's suspicion that human capability reached its peak or plateau around 1965-75. He's got no genuine objection to it.

When a man sets his face hard against the acceptability of Whites survival as an over-riding goal, in a world where genocide for the Whites is an ongoing reality, he reconciles himself to all the consequences of that. He devalues all the goods that Whites have produced, and all that they can in future produce, and the capacity that produces such goods, and the race itself, enough to make the killing of the goose that lays the golden eggs acceptable.

Anonymous Azimus October 07, 2012 1:49 AM  

There are so many contributing factors to this, from religion to education to The Boomers to who knows what... but I see at the root of it a slow conversion of society from "we" to "I". I've got mine, you get yours kind of attitude. Individualism is good, bur nothing happens in a vacuum. When churches tell us that Jesus wants us to be happy, when businesses tell us to reward ourselves for a change, when advisors counsel us to only do jobs we love, when governments tell us we're entitled to what we havenot earned... This... Is what "I" get. America needs more "we."

Anonymous Anonymous October 07, 2012 2:51 AM  

I did not see this on Professor Charlton's blog, but interesting comments here.

The commenter Bohm starts to get it, but then misses the point.

As Rand Simberg has alluded to http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/194087/towards-conservative-space-policy/rand-simberg

and as Nick Land has elaborated
http://www.thatsmags.com/shanghai/article/2694/lure-of-the-void-part-2

The Apollo program was not a space program, it was an extension of the Cold War. We shot some very large rockets a very long ways and sent along some very expensive payloads just to show that not only did we have bigger guns, but our dicks were bigger too. Few Americans yet understand what totally uninhibited ideological warfare really looks like. Interestingly, the Soviets did. This is probably why America won the first round: most were ignorant of the magnitude of what they had to lose.

None of these battles of ideological warfare nor the zombie bureacratic husks which remain of the war machinery had or have anything at all to do with actual human exploration of space. Actual human exploration of space remains in its infancy, not because of any political or economic deficiency, but because man does not explore for political or economic reasons, but only out of moral virtue: the appreciation of the beauty of God's creation is a form of prayer. The Israelites went to Canaan not because it was a rich land but because God told them it was for them; the Puritans who settled in America felt called their by God. When men come to feel that exploration and settlement of extraterrestrial space is a divine and moral imperative, then they will do so.

It is not correct that human beings need only water and disposal of human waste to survive. Animals require these things. Human beings do require two things to survive: conscious reason and moral virtue. Man is the only mortal being which can recognize and appreciate Goodness. This is the essence of humanity. To lack these things is to cease to be human. Man does not need material things to be human, because Man is lord and master of the material.

I am not sure what Vox means by "the decline of humanity". I suspect this is not what Vox means. I suspect Vox means this is a sign of the decline of civilization. Which may well be true. Humanity, however, cannot decline, because God has charged Man to rule over the beasts of the earth until the end of days. There is, of course, no promise that this will be done by means of our comfortable Western civilization; the manner in which Man rules the living things may be very different in the future.

As for the East, it is important to note that there are no measurable vestiges remaining of Eastern civilization. Eastern civilization was utterly defeated and destroyed by the West; every civilizing impulse which exists today in the East is completely and totally of Western extraction. The culture of the East has of course not perished at all, and has remained quite vibrant, and may in the fullness of time give rise to a new civilization, but this is unlikely to look anything like the old one. To resurrect something so obviously inferior would be insanity, and no insane culture survives.

What is more likely, however, is that civilization - which means Western civilization, the only kind in existence today - will succumb increasingly to barbarism, as it has in the past, as this is the way of things. The flame of progress will dwindle, beset by the dark spirits of barbarism, kept alive only by the memory of civilization past, pulling inward, concentrating - until at last in the fullness of time it explodes outwards once again, rising from the dead ashes of its prior incarnation to again wreak its terrible civilizing wonder on an astonished world.

After all, this isn't our chief monomyth for nothing.

- ChevalierdeJohnstone

Anonymous Pat Hannagan October 07, 2012 9:09 AM  

The capacity of protestants for self-misery and self-flagellation continues apace.

Anonymous FrankNorman October 07, 2012 11:30 AM  

Daybreaker October 07, 2012 12:24 AM

Bruce Charlton is fine with chronic, massive non-White mass immigration into all White countries and only White countries, and with compulsory integration, assimilation and eventually, inevitably intermarriage. He has no problems with the genocide of White people. Indeed, he objects to anyone making the fight against that genocide their top priority, as their top priority ought to be Jesus, who has no objection to the genocide of Whites.


Why do you assume Jesus has no objection to genocide? I rather think He does, whether or not those who claim to speak for Him do.
God obviously loves White people, He has used us greatly in His plans for world history.

Anonymous Tschafer October 08, 2012 10:16 AM  

While I certainly don't agree with Charlton on lots of things, I think that it's unfair to say that he doesn't care about immigration. He has written numerous blog posts and articles about the evils of mass immigration.

Anonymous Anonymous October 08, 2012 12:10 PM  

testing

Anonymous Emperor of Icecream October 08, 2012 5:31 PM  

I'm pretty sure the West is the only game in town these days. All progress the East has made has been derivative and imitative.

Stagnation of the West = Stagnation, period.

Anonymous Emperor of Icecream October 08, 2012 5:34 PM  

I believe there is one other cause equal to the cultural collapse, and that is the general tendency of systems to fail once they reach a certain stage of complexity.



I don't actually believe we're at the collapse stage. I think we're at the beginning of the stagnation stage, but with lots of efficiencies still to be wrung out of the system and technological momentum that still has a while to run down, and quite a bit of capital to run down too. In other words, late Roman Republic, not late Roman Empire.

But I think you are right about complexity, except that I'd put it another way. Over time, systems tend to become more efficient in the short-term, but less robust. Like just-in-time supply chains, which reduce costs but make end users more vulnerable to any disruptions in the chain.

Anonymous Emperor of Icecream October 08, 2012 5:43 PM  

Our present period of rapid urbanization began in about 1750 and has about run it's course.

So under your theory, the 500 years from 1250 to 1750 were this time of feudalization and ruralization? Whereas 950 to 1250 was like this acme of civilization and cities?

B.S.

Anonymous Anonymous October 19, 2012 8:57 AM  

I think it's very interesting that you picked 1972 as the peak of the West. 1971-1973 marked the beginning of the death the American muscle car (due to idiotic Federal regulation, of course.)

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