ALL BLOG POSTS AND COMMENTS COPYRIGHT (C) 2003-2014 VOX DAY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION IS EXPRESSLY PROHIBITED.

Friday, November 30, 2012

The gun, she smokes

One of the main reasons I am a vaccine skeptic is that the organizations which vaccine advocates repeatedly cite in their attempt to claim vaccine safety are caught concealing information that indicates the opposite:
 Documentation received from the National Coalition of Organized Women (NCOW) states that between 2009 and 2010 the mercury-laden combined flu vaccinations have increased Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting Systems (VAERS) fetal death reports by 4,250 percent in pregnant women. Eileen Dannemann, NCOW’s director, made abundantly clear that despite these figures being known to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the multiple-strain, inactivated flu vaccine containing mercury (Thimerosal) has once again been recommended to pregnant women as a safe vaccination this season....

Despite evidence that the CDC knew of the 4,250 percent increase in fetal death reports in 2009/2010, in order to ensure the continuance of the vaccine program for pregnant women, the CDC published a study in AJOG authored by Dr. Pedro Moro of the CDC in the fall of 2010. The study articulated that there were only 23 miscarriages caused by the single flu vaccine in 19 years between 1990 – 2009, an average of 1.2 miscarriages per year. This study formed the basis of a CDC worldwide publicity campaign that the flu shot was safe for pregnant women by willfully and strategically excluding the 2009 pandemic data, which was available to them.
For those who blithely argue that all vaccines are developed scientifically and therefore safe - a fascinating approach from a logical perspective - and insist that the CDC should be considered more reliable than other government regulatory agencies such as the BEA or the SEC, I wonder how they can defend the notion that the CDC data is trustworthy when it is confirmed that the organization is making knowingly false statements concerning the safety of vaccines known to cause adverse effects.

Labels:

85 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous November 30, 2012 2:12 AM  

Related.

Anonymous Dr. Idle Spectator, CDC Epidemiologist November 30, 2012 3:04 AM  

Dr. Pedro Moro

Meztizo or Indio Hispanic, or European Hispanic?

Is it not sad I can probably tell if he is an affirmative action epidemiologist with the CDC just based on looking at a picture of him? Is that not that exact opposite of what we try to teach kids about diversity and appearances? You probably ask why I bring that up. Because organizations and companies will in fact move minority candidates into key positions to shield them from criticism on some issue. It's basically a reverse of the old days when the idiot white son of the owner was untouchable, no matter how badly he screwed up. "Sorry dad, I didn't know she was a hooker. I have no idea what happened to the company credit card." I have seen it myself personally.

Sad. Well, that's the United States in 2012 as a crumbling r-selected society. Ignore it at your own peril.

Update: Ok, I looked at a picture of him. Definitely European Hispanic, from Peru. Dr. Pedro Moro went to the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia in Lima. So he will just be corrupt if anything is wrong, not inept or incompetent.

Anonymous JEB Stuart November 30, 2012 3:07 AM  

The CDC.
Atlanta is burning once again.

Anonymous zen0 November 30, 2012 3:20 AM  

The CDC also continues to massively exaggerate flu deaths even after being busted for it:

18 People Died Of The Flu, Not 36,000

In December of 2005, the British Medical Journal (online) published a shocking report by Peter Doshi, which spelled out the delusion and created tremors throughout the halls of the CDC.

Here is a quote from Doshi’s report: “[According to CDC statistics], ‘influenza and pneumonia’ took 62,034 lives in 2001—61,777 of which were attributable to pneumonia and 257 to flu, and in only 18 cases was the flu virus positively identified.”

Anonymous Outlaw X November 30, 2012 4:50 AM  

"17 And the dragon was wroth with the woman, and went to make war with the remnant of her seed, which keep the commandments of God, and have the testimony of Jesus Christ."

They come to destroy.

Anonymous scoobius dubious November 30, 2012 6:16 AM  

Wait, didn't the CDC get all blown up to smithereens in a giant tactical-nuke autodestruct?

Oh, right, sorry, that was The Walking Dead. So hard to tell reality apart from the zombie shows these days.

Anonymous FUBAR Nation (Ben) November 30, 2012 7:12 AM  

The CDC should be sued and the people responsible for the cover up should be jailed or executed for murder. Since the Supreme Court likes to cite foreign law, I'm sure the Italian earthquake case cited here will suffice.

Scientists need to know that their bs won't be put up with anymore.

Anonymous DrTorch November 30, 2012 7:37 AM  

Just a few days ago the MSM released a scare article stating a handful of deaths were "connected" to 5-hour Energy drink.

Many people were outraged at the company.

This, this gets ignored.

Anonymous jack November 30, 2012 8:11 AM  

I agree with Ben, above. Why cannot the individual families that suffered these deaths and miscarriages take those idiots [cdc] to court? I could see 10's of thousands of lawsuits happening all at once; none of this lumped together 'class action' crap. Make them start hurting, maybe they will get some kind of an act together, like, maybe, service in the public's interest; something having to do with the Hippocratic oath, I think. Heard that somewhere....

Anonymous FUBAR Nation (Ben) November 30, 2012 8:25 AM  

I can't stand the f'ers advertising everywhere to pump yourself full of poison so you can maybe avoid the flu. They don't point out that you can protect yourself against the flu with the proper nutrition including adequate vitamin D. I guess the big companies that push vaccines won't make money off their poison if people lived better.

It's the same deal with the food pyramid. Tell everyone to eat nutrient depleted whole grains, scare everyone about nutrient dense and healthy foods like eggs, dairy and meat and watch as the health of everyone in this country goes to shit.

Blogger IM2L844 November 30, 2012 8:45 AM  

Is it getting increasingly difficult for realists to maintain an optimistic faith in humanity or is it just me?

Blogger Joshua_D November 30, 2012 9:03 AM  

IM2L844 November 30, 2012 8:45 AM

Is it getting increasingly difficult for realists to maintain an optimistic faith in humanity or is it just me?


Never put your faith in humanity, just look at history. Have faith in God. He always delivers.

Blogger James Dixon November 30, 2012 9:04 AM  

I've made the mistake of getting flu shots three times in my life. The first two I merely got sick from. The third one I got the worst case of the flu I've ever had. Needless to say, I don't get them any more.

Some times the people giving the flu shots want to know why I'm not getting one. When I tell them they either say that's impossible or that I must have already had the flu.

Anonymous onejohn512 November 30, 2012 9:06 AM  

NCOW?!

Doesn't take bull, and won't going along with the herd.

Anonymous FUBAR Nation (Ben) November 30, 2012 9:06 AM  

Who knew that getting injected with flu virus material might actually cause you to get the flu?

Bottom line, don't trust your doctor. They are usually completely clueless and are just parroting the AMA or ADA line.

Anonymous Outlaw X November 30, 2012 9:07 AM  

"Is it getting increasingly difficult for realists to maintain an optimistic faith in humanity or is it just me?"

Sometimes you have to look past the the future and look at the past. Not long for the world but know the future because of the past; and pray for Vox and Ilk as well.

Anonymous FP November 30, 2012 9:14 AM  

The local talk radio guy Lars Larson was pushing against the anti-flu vaccine folks the other day on his local and national shows after that report of 100 people fired in Ohio for not taking vaccine. Larson had several folks call in supporting vaccines, references to polio, citing the CDC etc..

http://jobs.aol.com/articles/2012/11/27/mandatory-flu-shot-workers-fired/

"Everyone knows the flu shot has a serious purpose. After all, it's a safeguard against a condition that kills 36,000 people a year, according to the John Hopkins School of Medicine. But for the workers of one Ohio health center, the risks of skipping out on the vaccine extended beyond increased risk of catching the flu -- they got fired.

TriHealth, a Cincinnati, Ohio-based health center fired 150 of its workers the Wednesday before Thanksgiving for not complying with a mandate that every member of the 10,800-person staff get the vaccine, which was being offered for free on-site. The workers had been given a month to comply with the mandate before Nov. 16, according to local Ohio news outlet, WLWT"

Anonymous Edjamacator November 30, 2012 9:22 AM  

Tell everyone to eat nutrient depleted whole grains, scare everyone about nutrient dense and healthy foods like eggs, dairy and meat and watch as the health of everyone in this country goes to shit.

Are you talking about raw milk? I can't get that in my over-policed state so I drink cocoanut milk instead. I avoid pasteurized cow milk these days.

Blogger Bob Wallace November 30, 2012 9:31 AM  

"61,777 of which were attributable to pneumonia and 257 to flu, and in only 18 cases was the flu virus positively identified."


Pneumonia is nasty stuff. I have never seen anyone hospitalized for the flu and had mine own young sister hospitalized for it, and knew a girl in college who died from it - in her sleep, with her roommate in the next bed.

Blogger swiftfoxmark2 November 30, 2012 9:37 AM  

I blame Bill Gates.

No seriously, he's said he wanted to decrease the surplus population (to quote "A Christmas Carol") through vaccination. And he has the money to do it.

Anonymous onejohn512 November 30, 2012 9:41 AM  

Reply to:
Anonymous November 30, 2012 2:12 AM
Related.

The article you posted doesn't address the issue of vaccine contamination (not trivial by the way). Hundreds of thousands of deaths due to simian virus 40 polio vaccine contamination in the 50s and 60s later the cause of cancers attributable to SV40. Nor does it account for decreasing frequency of the diseases to be vaccinated against that was already underway before vaccine treatments were available as the graphic shows in the case of 4 out of the 5 diseases graphed.

Anonymous Outlaw X November 30, 2012 9:43 AM  

Are you talking about raw milk? I can't get that in my over-policed state so I drink cocoanut milk instead. I avoid pasteurized cow milk these days.

Pasteurized milk won't hurt you though raw (fresh) milk is better for you. I had a guy tell me one time we shouldn't even be drinking milk because that is not natural, and when I asked him if he ate cheese he said "Yes" Then I said it comes from milk. He then called me an idiot and walked away.

Anonymous stg58 November 30, 2012 9:51 AM  

You know Tad?

Anonymous bub November 30, 2012 9:51 AM  

My brother was in perfect health, when he developed a slight persistent cough that got progressively worse. He nearly died, had 9 lung operations, was on oxygen for a couple of years, finally got a lung transplant. He is now 100% disabled but doing a lot better. His doctors point to his first and only flu shot the same year his troubles started. Bernie Mac "disease".

Anonymous Enoch Powell November 30, 2012 10:00 AM  

Ah yessss, Dr. Pedro Moro, the lively, vibrant, diverse, drunken Mexican, better than any stinkin White man. He articulate at de Medikal Skool of Imperial County. He articulate his ass off baby.

Anonymous Outlaw X November 30, 2012 10:00 AM  

"You know Tad?"

No, not personally, but he may eat his cereal with cheese instead of milk?

Anonymous FUBAR Nation (Ben) November 30, 2012 10:04 AM  

Raw milk is okay if you can tolerate it (just make sure the farmer is clean and the cows are healthy. You don't want to drink milk from an unclean or unhealthy cow). Many people can't, including me. I can tolerate cheese & yogurt so it depends on the person.

Don't fall for the low fat garbage. Food has fat for a number of reasons including:

1) Fat is satiating, which results in eating less food and the greater likelihood in some people of running a caloric deficit, necessary to weight loss.
2) Fat promotes vitamin and mineral absorption, so if you eat low fat foods your body is not going to be able to extract all the vitamins and minerals that the food contains.
3) Fat contains nutrients, such as vitamin A & D found in milk, especially raw milk.

Blogger IM2L844 November 30, 2012 10:15 AM  

Never put your faith in humanity, just look at history. Have faith in God. He always delivers.

Good advice, to be sure, but I don't think it's necessarily an either/or proposition.

I certainly have faith in God, but I've also always had faith that people, given the chance, will generally choose to do the "right" thing. Recently, however, my propensity for giving people the benefit of the doubt has been waning. Not to the point of paranoia. I don't spend time looking over my shoulder and I still leave my doors unlocked most of the time, but recently I have noticed a considerable shift in my perception of people's perspicacity. The realization that there could be legions of Tad-like idiots on the loose and roaming the planet kind of bothers me.

Anonymous harry12 November 30, 2012 10:44 AM  

stg58 November 30, 2012 9:51 AM
You know Tad?


+1

Anonymous Cryan Ryan November 30, 2012 10:49 AM  

My sister is a nurse.

I can say with complete confidence, if Sis gave 9 people flu shots and watched them drop dead, as long as the doctor told her to continue, she would give the 10th person the shot.

So I won't be asking Sis for her opinion on this new controversy.

Anonymous DrTorch November 30, 2012 10:58 AM  

But, but, flu vaccines protect from heart disease too!

http://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/news/20121026/flu-vaccines-heart

Anonymous Edjamacator November 30, 2012 11:02 AM  

Pasteurized milk won't hurt you though raw (fresh) milk is better for you. I had a guy tell me one time we shouldn't even be drinking milk because that is not natural, and when I asked him if he ate cheese he said "Yes" Then I said it comes from milk. He then called me an idiot and walked away.

Seriously? He didn't know cheese was from milk? Was he two?

I cut out the milk because while not harmful, it also sounds like it doesn't do any good as everything good is killed off, so the switch to cocanut milk which supposedly keeps the good stuff alive.

I've started also not worrying about fat (like Ben says) the way others do. The best bread I've found in my price range is Ezekial bread from some brand I can't remember right this second, but it's made from sprouted grains.

On topic, my wife, while pregnant, turned down all extra shots including the flu shot. I'm glad she did. Can't trust anything the government says anymore, as if you ever could.

Anonymous Edjamacator November 30, 2012 11:03 AM  

The realization that there could be legions of Tad-like idiots on the loose and roaming the planet kind of bothers me.

The last election should have driven that point home quite nicely, one would think.

Blogger James Dixon November 30, 2012 11:44 AM  

> The last election should have driven that point home quite nicely, one would think.

I've had some time to think about the results. Obama didn't get anywhere near as many votes as he did last time. If those people who didn't vote for him this time had voted for Romney, he would have won. Romney didn't get as many votes as McCain, in spite of being (by most standards) a far better candidate. The full McCain vote probably still wouldn't have given Romney the election, but it would have been much closer.

So I'm thinking that while demographics played a role, the real culprit was simply that Romney simply didn't appeal to voters, not necessarily that there aren't enough republican voters (though that possibility can't be discarded with the information we have).

It's entirely possible that the Robert's betrayal and Romney's actions at the convention combined to turn enough otherwise loyal republicans away that the necessary voters simply stayed home this election. If that's the case, the republicans my have shot themselves in the foot one too many times.

Anonymous Matt November 30, 2012 12:01 PM  

Romney didn't get as many votes as McCain, in spite of being (by most standards) a far better candidate. The full McCain vote probably still wouldn't have given Romney the election, but it would have been much closer.

This is, alas, not true. It was based on an early, incomplete count of the popular vote. The final figures are:

2012:
Obama: 65.1 M
Romney: 60.6 M

2008:
Obama: 69.4 M
McCain: 59.9 M

Blogger IM2L844 November 30, 2012 12:03 PM  

The last election should have driven that point home quite nicely, one would think.

The reactions to the election have been much more instructive than the outcome of the election itself. I wouldn't have been the least bit comforted, with respect to humanity's apparently dwindling sagacity, by a Romney victory.

Anonymous JI November 30, 2012 12:19 PM  

Vaccine use can be justified on the basis that fewer babies = less global warming.

Anonymous Dan in Tx November 30, 2012 12:27 PM  

Kind of veering off topic but one possibly encouraging aspect of this year's election result vs the 2008 election is that fewer people took part. Perhaps more are waking up to the whole thing being a sham?

Blogger Michael November 30, 2012 12:28 PM  

I'm pondering an idea ...

Force everyone to get a flu shot before they are allowed to vote.

No, I don't know what that would accomplish. But the idea is oddly appealing.

Anonymous Edjamacator November 30, 2012 12:35 PM  

The reactions to the election have been much more instructive than the outcome of the election itself. I wouldn't have been the least bit comforted, with respect to humanity's apparently dwindling sagacity, by a Romney victory.

Nor I, but if nothing else, it also proved that for minority churches (on the whole), God's will matters nothing in comparison to gubbmint freebies, color, and immigration issues. So now hopefully more people will learn and drop the whole "naturally conservative Hispanic majority" hope they are clinging to.

Anonymous FUBAR Nation (Ben) November 30, 2012 12:38 PM  

Edjamacator, the only fats you should avoid like the plague are polyunsaturated fats like canola, corn, soy, safflower, and other seed oils, as well as trans fats. They cause inflammation and assorted other ailments. Oils that are neutral for flavoring are olive oil, macademia oil, avocado oil and the like. It's best to just eat an olive for example. The best oils for cooking are coconut and palm oil, which fall under the classification of tropical.

Saturated fats are fine and do not cause heart disease in any way. Any doctor that pushes cholesterol lowering drugs is a pimp for the government and pharmaceutical companies pushing them.

You know how polyunsaturated oils and trans fats got into the food supply? The f'in government and assorted food interests pushed the idea that saturated fats cause heart disease and touted these dangerous fats as heart healthy when the opposite is true.

Anonymous Porky? November 30, 2012 12:50 PM  

It's entirely possible that the Robert's betrayal and Romney's actions at the convention combined to turn enough otherwise loyal republicans away that the necessary voters simply stayed home this election.

+1

If that's the case, the republicans my have shot themselves in the foot one too many times.

Should've aimed much higher.

Anonymous onejohn512 November 30, 2012 12:53 PM  

...
Barbara Loe Fisher, president and co-founder of the National Vaccine Information Center, a non-profit organization which advocates vaccine safety, testified before the House Government Reform Committee's subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness in September 2003 that

[T]oday, U.S. federal health agencies admit the following two facts: (1) Salk polio vaccine released for public use between 1955 and 1963 was contaminated with SV40; and SV40 has been proven to cause cancer in animals.

Continuing, Fisher said that at a 1997 conference on SV40 and human cancers held by the National Institutes of Health which she attended, "there was no disagreement among both government and non-government scientists about these two facts.

The only disagreement was whether SV40 was actually being identified in the cancerous tumors of children and adults alive today and, if it was, whether the monkey virus was in fact responsible for their cancer. Non-government scientists working in independent labs around the world said, 'Yes.' But the scientists connected with the U.S. government said 'No.'"

Fisher went on to say that "credentialed non-government scientists in multiple labs around the world continue to identify SV40 in human brain and lung cancers of children and adults and are finding that SV40 is also associated with bone cancers and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas."

Despite ongoing denials, an increasing number of researchers continue to maintain that not only is there a bona fide link between Salk's SV40-tainted vaccines and cancer, that federal government officials and agencies responsible for ensuring the safety of such vaccines - then and now - are loathe to admit it, perhaps because they fear the fallout in terms of lawsuits and lost credibility.
http://www.naturalnews.com/032854_SV40_polio_vaccines.html

Blogger Survival Gardener, AKA David the Good November 30, 2012 12:55 PM  

JI: "Vaccine use can be justified on the basis that fewer babies = less global warming."

I think you're on to something. From the vaccinations to the GMO food to abortion... there seems to be a pattern.

Anonymous onejohn512 November 30, 2012 1:09 PM  

...
Human cells infected by SV40 in vitro develop extensive genetic damage [(2), reviewed in (3)] and have grown as tumor nodules when injected into volunteers(4). The susceptibility of human
cells to SV40 is cell type dependent, with mesothelial cells the most susceptible (2,3,5). SV40 is the only known carcinogen that, by itself, causes malignant transformation and immortalization
of human mesothelial cells in tissue culture (2,3,5).
Second, the incidence of mesothelioma in the United States has increased from nearly none in 1955 to approximately 2500 cases per year, and SV40 may be one of the contributing factors.
...
http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/content/94/3/229.2.full.pdf

Anonymous whatever November 30, 2012 1:10 PM  


I agree with Ben, above. Why cannot the individual families that suffered these deaths and miscarriages take those idiots [cdc] to court? I could see 10's of thousands of lawsuits happening all at once; none of this lumped together 'class action' crap. Make them start hurting, maybe they will get some kind of an act together, like, maybe, service in the public's interest; something having to do with the Hippocratic oath, I think. Heard that somewhere....


Special courts were created to try "vaccine cases". These special court operates according to special rules. These special rules are only followed when they can get a case dismissed.

Anonymous Edjamacator November 30, 2012 1:26 PM  

Ben, thanks, that sounds exactly what I've been doing on "The Maker's Diet." That's one reason I cut out the dairy as much as I could (no raw milk allowed in this state). Funny how the government actually wants us to have bad health or is just incompetent with their food recommendations.

Anonymous WaterBoy November 30, 2012 1:33 PM  

Michael: "No, I don't know what that would accomplish."

It would result in a much larger and intrusive government, as the majority of those voting would be the ones who expect the government to take care of them.

Anonymous Azimus November 30, 2012 2:02 PM  

Isn't asking lawyers to protect us from the government sort of like seeking the protection of Sarumon from Mordor?

Anonymous The CronoLink November 30, 2012 2:06 PM  

What is it with these psychopaths that they're hell bent on testing their thrash on (soon-to-be) newborns?

Anonymous FUBAR Nation (Ben) November 30, 2012 2:23 PM  

They aren't doctors. They are salesmen for pharmaceutical companies and the government.

You think a salesman isn't going to try to sell you his product? That's how he makes his living.

Anonymous Conrad The Crazed November 30, 2012 2:24 PM  

The vaccine makers have successfully acquired immunity from lawsuits. If that doesn't tell us everything we need to know, then I can't imagine what would.

As someone also posted, the gubment has set up a special 'vaccine injury fund' where the types of lawsuits concerning vaccines can be 'administered'. There again is another Volume Level 11 example of 'what else do we need to know'. They have set up a fund specifically BECAUSE vaccines are injuring and or killing people.

Anonymous onejohn512 November 30, 2012 2:48 PM  

Currently medicine too poorly understands the results of injecting directly into the body foreign proteins, DNA fragments, adjuvants among other compounds in vaccines. As a consequence it seems reasonable given the complexity of human immune system to expect in significant numbers adverse impact on the health of injection recipients. Further when the profit motive is accounted for, and what we know has been done in the name of profit to our food, why would anyone trust that less well understood man made compounds injected into our bodies would do any good whatsoever?

Blogger James Dixon November 30, 2012 2:53 PM  

> This is, alas, not true.

Thanks for the correction, Matt. I apologize for stating incorrect information.

Blogger James Dixon November 30, 2012 2:59 PM  

Matt, can you give me a source for your figures? Politico shows that they updated their site yesterday and they still show 62.6M and 59.1M.

Anonymous Porky? November 30, 2012 3:00 PM  

From the vaccinations to the GMO food to abortion... there seems to be a pattern.

GMO does not belong in this group.

Anonymous Clay November 30, 2012 3:06 PM  

Speak of the Devil......

Blogger Doom November 30, 2012 3:22 PM  

Since I am not pregnant at the moment, I went ahead and got my flu shot today. Bleh. I did mention this to the nurse. She said they don't handle pregnant women there. I just suggested, though, that if she has daughters, to have them do their homework before diving in. I suggested she look at the newest data out, that the CDC is, at best, fibbing in it's appraisal. I saw the worried(tm) sign go up on her face. Yeah, perhaps I have done some good for the day.

I love that worried(tm) look women get though. It's almost as good as the curious look a cat gets when you start messing with string. Or the look on the face of men when a attractive woman almost, or does have, a wardrobe failure (not to include J. Jackson, by my taste).

Anonymous kh123 November 30, 2012 3:57 PM  

"National Coalition of Organized Women (NCOW)"

Again, like the physicists forwarding suspect ideas with SUSY, this has to be an inside joke of some kind.

Anonymous kh123 November 30, 2012 3:59 PM  

...Which is to say, I don't advocate putting mercury into unadjusted bodies.

Anonymous Noah B. November 30, 2012 4:38 PM  

Sadly, I realize that news of systematic infanticide in the UK will not come as much of a surprise to the better informed.

Blogger Daniel November 30, 2012 5:28 PM  

OT: Speaking of guns, the AP just now changed the "typo" describing the archer who killed two people in Wyoming as a "gunman."

Bow and arrow laws in this country are way too lenient.

Anonymous jay c November 30, 2012 5:45 PM  

It's the same deal with the food pyramid. Tell everyone to eat nutrient depleted whole grains, scare everyone about nutrient dense and healthy foods like eggs, dairy and meat and watch as the health of everyone in this country goes to shit.

Ben, i think you will like this blog once the proprietress actually starts posting.

Anonymous jay c November 30, 2012 5:53 PM  

Sorry. Trying again: noblenutrition.us

Anonymous rycamor November 30, 2012 6:50 PM  

FUBAR Nation (Ben) November 30, 2012 12:38 PM
You know how polyunsaturated oils and trans fats got into the food supply? The f'in government and assorted food interests pushed the idea that saturated fats cause heart disease and touted these dangerous fats as heart healthy when the opposite is true.


Part of this came about as a result of a search for a scapegoat to get sugar off the hook in preceding decades. From the 40s to the 70s there was plenty of research pointing to sugar as a major problem in the Western diet, but the Sugar Association managed to buy the government time and time again. Of course, it all started with FDR's Sugar Act, which subsidized sugar growers and set things in motion for the powerful association that came later. Interesting article here: http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2012/10/sugar-industry-lies-campaign

Anonymous rycamor November 30, 2012 7:12 PM  

These days when the medical establishment wants me to do something, my instinctive reaction is to do the opposite. I know it's not completely valid, but it is just my reaction, considering all the stupidity we have been expected to submit to. For example, we are just now finding that chemetherapy makes cancer worse. Ditto for many other cancer-prevention drugs, as the article shows.

The problem is not that science and medicine searches for a cure. The problem is a public that is far too credulous and a government-industrial research system that picks winners and losers, ergo guess what: the winners tend to be expensive products and methods that line many pockets. Not a whole lot of dollars coming to scientists and doctors who tell cancer patients to exercise and stop eating sugars and grains, are there?

Anonymous Dr. Idle Spectator, UMass Oncology November 30, 2012 7:43 PM  

For example, we are just now finding that chemetherapy makes cancer worse. Ditto for many other cancer-prevention drugs, as the article shows.

Your link is completely fucking stupid.

a) I think you mean chemotherapy. And when they say "cancer-prevention" drugs, which ones are they talking about? Old drugs like Methotrexate from the 1940s, or the new generation of drugs out like Imatinib? There are hundreds of drugs.

b) The pubmed articles linked at the bottom have nothing to do with what he said in the article. Not to mention the first link is on glioblastoma, which is only has to do with a particular type of brain tumor from the astrocytes. I quote: Despite being the most prevalent form of primary brain tumor, GBM incidence is only 2–3 cases per 100,000 people in Europe and North America

c) Which cancer? There are hundreds of types of them.

d) Why the fuck would I use tumeric for cancers like retinoblastoma with a cure rate of 98%, which I can cure with a simple chemotherapy applied to the eye?

e) I actually encourage people reading to take tumeric and vitamin D instead of using chemotherapy. You know why? That way, the stupid people die quicker. Also, they'll be less demand, so that way I get my drugs cheaper. It is a win-win for me.


Anthony is an accomplished investigative journalist whose articles have appeared on top news sites and have been read by millions worldwide.

Perhaps he can investigate some sock drawers next, and write hard-hitting pieces on the fabric selection.

Anonymous Big Country November 30, 2012 8:18 PM  

"Your link is completely fucking stupid."

Ever heard of the Hegelian Dialectic "Dr."?




Anonymous Idle Spectator November 30, 2012 8:38 PM  

Ever heard of the Hegelian Dialectic "Dr."?

Ever heard of the hot dog "Big"?

(See how I answered your meaningless rhetorical question with another? I'm crafty that way.)

Anonymous stg58 November 30, 2012 8:40 PM  

"Dr. Idle Spectator, UMass Oncology"

Warning! CREDENTIALS ALERT! Warning!

Anonymous stg58 November 30, 2012 8:40 PM  

"Dr. Idle Spectator, UMass Oncology"

Warning! CREDENTIALS ALERT! Warning!

Anonymous Dr. Mengele, Liverpool Care Pathway November 30, 2012 8:53 PM  

We should all vaccinate our children immediately to prevent all childhood diseases. I swear I am not experimenting on the little useless eaters.

Anonymous Idle Spectator Cares November 30, 2012 9:06 PM  

"Dr. Idle Spectator, UMass Oncology"

Warning! CREDENTIALS ALERT! Warning!


And yet, not a single medical point I made was actually addressed. I even put them with letters because I thought that would help the not-good-reading people. <3 <3 <3 Was it the big words like glioblastoma that did it? Interesting.

Maybe I should color code next time.

Here's a crayon to get started:
[__|R_E_D|__]>

Anonymous Big Country November 30, 2012 9:16 PM  

(See how I answered your meaningless rhetorical question with another? I'm crafty that way.)

Was it rhetorical "crafty" one?

Anonymous Idle Spectator? November 30, 2012 9:18 PM  

Was it rhetorical "crafty" one?

I don't know, is it?

Anonymous rycamor November 30, 2012 11:06 PM  

Dr. Idle Spectator, UMass Oncology November 30, 2012 7:43 PM

For example, we are just now finding that chemetherapy makes cancer worse. Ditto for many other cancer-prevention drugs, as the article shows.

Your link is completely fucking stupid.


My dear Dr., nothing would make me happier than to be reassured as to the efficacy of modern medicine's more tenaciously-held beliefs. I have just not found these questions answered to my satisfaction. My experience is that the touting of credentials as the first step in someone's argument doesn't bode well for the validity of the claim. However, if it is credentials you want, a quick look around will show plenty of credentialed researchers who have serious doubts about the overall efficacy of chemotherapy and have endeavored to present evidence thereof, and who have of course been ignored by the medical establishment and the media.

Evidence abounds that the modern medical establishment is full of pride, arrogance, and hubris. Shoddy research, questionable metrics and methodologies, outright fraud in many cases, and of course the ever-present political intervention by government and large organizations tends to mark the R&D side of things, while the M.Deity complex seems to be ever-present on the personal side of things. I don't say this in glee, but sadness, since I have family and friends in medicine. I have seen it first-hand many times.

And notice, in my original comment, I wasn't chucking out all of establishment medical practice, just underscoring my increasing apprehension with the current state of affairs.

Anonymous Count Idle Spectator IV, Königreich Württemberg November 30, 2012 11:48 PM  

[___|R_E_D|___]>
And after two large and one small paragraph of typing on other general issues facing modern medicine today, the points A through E about the link sucking balls through a straw were argued with or refuted.... how... ...exactly ...?...
[___|R_E_D|___]>


However, if it is credentials you want, a quick look around will show plenty of credentialed researchers who have serious doubts about the overall efficacy of chemotherapy and have endeavored to present evidence thereof, and who have of course been ignored by the medical establishment and the media.

[__|B_L_U_E|__]>
On efficacy, see points A, C, and D. Eventually generalized chemotherapy will probably be scrapped and replaced with more localized treatments with(out) less collateral damage. Gene therapy delivered by virus vectors maybe, possibly radioactive pellets for tumors. Hence point A on the hundreds of drugs, as drug from generation-Gleevec is wayyyyy different than generation-Methotrexate.

This ol' Idler does not care about credentials at all, hence why I spectate. I post titles and suffixes from time to time for amusement, like Vox posts his Mensa membership. And this is, of course, a different link from the first one you posted that I eviserated.
[__|B_L_U_E|__]>

Anonymous kh123 November 30, 2012 11:50 PM  

"Anthony is an accomplished investigative journalist whose articles have appeared on top news sites and have been read by millions worldwide... Perhaps he can investigate some sock drawers next, and write hard-hitting pieces on the fabric selection."

"...and of course the ever-present political intervention by government and large organizations tends to mark the R&D side of things, while the M.Deity complex seems to be ever-present on the personal side of things."


Shaping up to be one of the more entertaining discussions here.

Carry on.

Anonymous rycamor December 01, 2012 12:56 AM  

Idler, I don't need to defend the first link. I wasn't offering proof of anything, merely an example of why I have my current set of apprehensions about the arrogance of modern medicine. The evidence is all over the place. Perhaps it could start with admitting that human physiology is extremely complicated and we don't have a handle on it as if it is some deterministic finite state machine. The whole "there's a drug for this, and a surgery for that" attitude has run rampant.

My biggest frustration these days is that our whole society seems to want to paper over one error with another correction, rather than address the original error, and modern healthcare (especially in the USA) seems to take this to extremes. Why is it that 1 in 2 adults is on some prescription medication, and that 1 in 5 children is medicated, and flouride is distributed in every municipal water supply and dental amalgam is full of mercury, and countless other questionable things we are assured of with full confidence? We do one thing wrong, and then another thing on top to correct it, only to get carried away on a wave of unintended consequences. People are tossed into hospitals at the drop of a hat, and then we find that hospital-related infections are the 6-th leading cause of death in the nation.

My wife is a nurse, and every single time some relative of ours has ended up in the hospital she has had to practically go into combat mode to ensure that some doctor doesn't prescribe a drug without checking to see what other doctors have prescribed. The arrogance and carelessness is truly disturbing.

So yes, you can take your condescending little insults and clever crayons and shove them right up your ass. There needs to be some serious humility exhibited in your profession, sir.

Anonymous Idle Spectator December 01, 2012 3:36 AM  

Idler, I don't need to defend the first link.

That's Dr. Idler, M.D. MBA O.M.G. MFA Ph.D. WTF Esq. to you.

I wasn't offering proof of anything, merely an example of why I have my current set of apprehensions about the arrogance of modern medicine.

Really? That's your example for that, out of the million of other possible good ones? Like say, using the Vioxx painkiller recall, or statins and brain functioning? What is next, using the Exxon Valdez as an example of wonderful Alaskan sea captains?

Perhaps it could start with admitting that human physiology is extremely complicated and we don't have a handle on it as if it is some deterministic finite state machine.

I think anyone in college who took Physiology 101 would know that. Eddie Murphy as Mr. Robinson voice: "Holy sheet man, there's a lot of parts here! Who could dat part be?"

People are tossed into hospitals at the drop of a hat, and then we find that hospital-related infections are the 6-th leading cause of death in the nation.

It's a learning experience. That's how we know not to bloodlet people anymore or have them ingest mercury tonics.

My wife is a nurse, and every single time some relative of ours has ended up in the hospital she has had to practically go into combat mode to ensure that some doctor doesn't prescribe a drug without checking to see what other doctors have prescribed. The arrogance and carelessness is truly disturbing.

Contraindication effects. That's because most doctors don't know jack about pharmacology. Adverse drug reactions from legal drugs are one of the leading causes of death in the United States now. I.e. Michael Jackson and Anna Nicole Smith and her son Daniel Wayne Smith. Well, technically Daniel et. al. was in the Bahamas when it happened, but close enough. That's why pharmacists are so important now. But you got married? I am sorry for your loss...

So yes, you can take your condescending little insults and clever crayons and shove them right up your ass. There needs to be some serious humility exhibited in your profession, sir.

"My" profession? I am many things to many people. Doctor today, truck driver tomorrow. He thinks crayons are clever. That's it, let it out. LET IT OUT. STRIKE ME DOWN.

Now the healing may begin.

Anonymous CarpCzar December 01, 2012 8:56 AM  

The health care establishment I work for now requires a yearly flu shot as a condition of employment. I came to work for them before the mandate, so I don't have to get it, and don't, but they pester you a lot about it anyway. But, the main thing that gets me is they can tell you what to put in your body, doesn't that bother anyone?

Anonymous stg58 December 01, 2012 11:18 AM  

Ok so Dr Troll, M.D. Ph.D. WTF Esq. Is a troll. Feel free to ignore him.

Anonymous Susan December 01, 2012 12:10 PM  

First and only time I did the flu shot, it took me 6 months to get better. Never ever will again. Especially when the CDC publicly admits that the flu shot they have created for that year won't protect you from the strain of flu that is expected that current season. It might help give protection from other stuff though.

It has to be a woman or a liberal that came up with that kind of twisted logic. Or maybe a liberal woman!

Anonymous Idle Spectator December 01, 2012 5:39 PM  

"Feel free to ignore him."

Yes, please do. You must be this tall to ride this ride. And his link is still stupid.

Anonymous FUBAR Nation (Ben) December 01, 2012 5:54 PM  

jay c is this your new blog?

Post a Comment

NO ANONYMOUS COMMENTS. Anonymous comments will be deleted.

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home

Newer Posts Older Posts