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Monday, June 10, 2013

An innovative approach to education

I have to admit, I've been a bit skeptical of Jared Diamond's claim that we of the civilized West have much to learn from the noble primitive cultures of Papua New Guinea.  However, their novel approach to public education does appear to have some aspects worth considering:
A teacher has been tortured and beheaded by her neighbours in a Papua New Guinea village because they say she was a witch responsible for the death of a sick villager. The angry mob brandishing guns, machetes and axes surrounded her house and pulled Helen Rumbali, her sister and two nieces away. They then burnt down the house.
No doubt the advocates of the Diversity Gospel are sad because they presently enjoy insufficient Papua New Guineans in their neighborhoods.  Which is a pity, because in addition to bringing more diversity and vibrancy with them, they would also provide what one can only presume is a highly effective means of dealing with recalcitrant teachers unions.

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47 Comments:

Anonymous Will Best June 10, 2013 1:04 PM  

I don't know if burning for witchcraft is in order, but I think I could get behind bringing the public stockade back.

Anonymous Alexander June 10, 2013 1:06 PM  

It would be a net gain on the present system if our teachers limited themselves to simply killing off the sick. Of course, the doctors already have that covered so that might cause tension.

Anonymous Belgium dude June 10, 2013 1:20 PM  

Papua's citizens quickly recognized foreign-imposed Progressive Public Education for what it really is, just another manifestation of demonic possession.

Blogger Doom June 10, 2013 1:21 PM  

Here and I thought multiculturalism was only ever a negative. I don't know if those folk are still cannibals, but if so, teachers would have finally become truly edifying. A win win. Yum!

Blogger Unknown June 10, 2013 1:23 PM  

This comment has been removed by the author.

Blogger Unknown June 10, 2013 1:24 PM  

Again, misrepresenting the "Diversity Gospel" concept. Christians who have an elementary understanding of the Gospel wouldn't do such practices as described above. Vibrancy (in Christ) is our strength.

Anonymous lefty mclefterson June 10, 2013 1:26 PM  

Ahem ...

UH: SALEMMM. ANYONNNNE???

Blogger jamsco June 10, 2013 1:27 PM  

Vox, Two things:

1. Again, I'd sure like to see your definition of the diversity gospel, specifically, what are its advocates advocating and what is its connection with this story from New Guinea?

2. I really liked you usage of the word recalcitrant here.

Blogger JohnG June 10, 2013 1:28 PM  

I can think of scores of "educators" that I wouldn't mind seeing get the PNG treatment.

Anonymous Disingenuous White Liberal June 10, 2013 1:31 PM  

But White people burn witches too.

Anonymous Josh June 10, 2013 1:33 PM  

They're doing it wrong. Aren't you supposed to burn witches?

And did anyone scientifically investigate whether she weighed the same as a duck?

Anonymous Vidad June 10, 2013 1:37 PM  

I don't see the downside here.

Incidentally, there's a picture of VD going fishing about 2/3 of the way down the page on the original article.

Anonymous Josh June 10, 2013 1:47 PM  

Incidentally, there's a picture of VD going fishing about 2/3 of the way down the page on the original article.

No way VD is that tan

Anonymous Stickwick June 10, 2013 1:53 PM  

Anyone who's interested in a glimpse of the noble primitive life ought to read Lords of the Earth by Don Richardson. The author relates the efforts of Western Christian missionaries to bring the Gospel to the cannibal Yali tribesmen of Papua. Unfortunately, the missionaries were somewhat successful in bringing God into the midst of the Yali people, and failed to realize it was they who had so much to learn from the women- and children-hating kembu spirits.

Anonymous Anonagain June 10, 2013 1:55 PM  

However, their novel approach to public education does appear to have some aspects worth considering:

A teacher has been tortured and beheaded by her neighbours


The spontaneous eruption of laughter relieved the pain from the stupid of the last post.

Anonymous Orion June 10, 2013 2:14 PM  

"UH: SALEMMM. ANYONNNNE???"

No thanks, I don't smoke.

Anonymous Daniel June 10, 2013 2:14 PM  

What a teachable moment.

Anonymous allyn71 June 10, 2013 2:15 PM  

"Again, misrepresenting the "Diversity Gospel" concept. Christians who have an elementary understanding of the Gospel wouldn't do such practices as described above. Vibrancy (in Christ) is our strength." - Travis Kurtz June 10, 2013 1:24 PM

So if someone is Christian they won't commit autrocities? Well lets see....

From wiki- The Rwandan government reported on November 1, 2006, that 56.9% of the Rwanda's population is Roman Catholic, 26% is Protestant, 11.1% is Seventh-day Adventist, 4.6% is Muslim, 1.7% claims no religious affiliation, and 0.1% practices traditional indigenous beliefs such as the Jabiyan ethno-religious belief system

All that Christianity stopped the Rwandan's from chopping up 800,000 of their fellow Christians with machetes...or not.

Guess there might be a little more to it than the level of Christianity, but culture and race definetly are not it, something caused it but nope, no way was it race and culture.

Anonymous Josh June 10, 2013 2:15 PM  

Anyone who's interested in a glimpse of the noble primitive life ought to read Lords of the Earth by Don Richardson. The author relates the efforts of Western Christian missionaries to bring the Gospel to the cannibal Yali tribesmen of Papua.

I think I've read that. Is that the book where the cannibals spent a great deal of time plotting betrayals and murders of their fellow tribesmen and thought that judas Iscariot was the hero of the new testament?

Anonymous Daniel June 10, 2013 2:20 PM  

Incidentally, there's a picture of VD going fishing about 2/3 of the way down the page on the original article.

Don't think so. That net isn't even running on Ubuntu.

Anonymous Josh June 10, 2013 2:21 PM  


All that Christianity stopped the Rwandan's from chopping up 800,000 of their fellow Christians with machetes...or not.


You neglected to include this part of that wiki article:

Traditional religion, despite officially being followed by only 0.1% of the population, retains an influence. Many Rwandans view the Christian God as synonymous with the traditional Rwandan God Imana


So their christianity is more akin to the syncretism of places like Latin America, where traditional African religion is mixed with christian (usually Catholic) teachings.

Anonymous Stickwick June 10, 2013 2:34 PM  

Josh,

You're thinking of Richardson's other book, Peace Child, which recounted his experience with a different tribe.

Incidentally, my father, who taught "social studies" (among other subjects) in high school, had his students read Lords of the Earth to prepare them for the history of Canada part of the curriculum. This was a genius move on his part, because it set his students up to truly appreciate the history of the civilization in which they had the privilege to live. Diamond is right that we have something to learn from the people of Papua -- it's perspective.

Anonymous allyn71 June 10, 2013 2:43 PM  

I see so they self-identify as different sects of the Christian religion (which implies understanding of different Christian doctriens) but are not real Catholics and Protestants. They are not pure enough Christians and that is the reason they committed the atrocities. Well lets see what the experts say.

Once again from wiki because it is easy - "Timothy Longman has provided the most detailed discussion of the role of religion in the Rwandan genocide in Christianity and Genocide in Rwanda, published in 2010.[5]

Longman argues that both Catholic and Protestant churches helped to make the genocide possible by giving moral sanction to the killing. Churches had longed played ethnic politics themselves, favoring the Tutsi during the colonial period then switching allegiance to the Hutu after 1959, sending a message that ethnic discrimination was consistent with church teaching. The church leaders had also long had close ties with the political leaders, and after the genocide began, the church leaders called on the population to support the new interim government, the very government supporting the genocide."

Obviously the Church sanctioned teachings of ethnic segragation are because they don't know the gospel and were confused by the traditional God Imana. Has to be it and not the fact that they were Africans doing what Africans do. Once again race has nothing to do with it and instead it was all those Rwandan Catholics and Protestants confused by that tricky Imana. Yeah, that is a more logical conclusion than an African is gonna African.

Anonymous Anonymous June 10, 2013 3:02 PM  

Burning leftists at the stake? What isn't there to love?

Anonymous jay c June 10, 2013 3:17 PM  

If you read the original article, be sure to down vote the imbeciles claiming that this is just like Christianity 300 years ago.

Anonymous Poglavnik June 10, 2013 3:18 PM  

Beheading the teacher- that is a innovative approach to education but also a interesting title for a rock song.

Better than "Hot for teacher",well maybe not better,but a slight improvement.

Anonymous Anonymous June 10, 2013 3:32 PM  

But did she weigh the same as a duck?

Blogger Lovekraft June 10, 2013 3:33 PM  

Whose to say, really, that various cliques of teachers haven't already formed their own covens? Wouldn't surprise me that they are practicing a very subtle brand of witchcraft in which incremental attacks on children's self esteem is seen as life-giving.

Anonymous anon123 June 10, 2013 3:38 PM  

I wonder what Margaret Meade would think of this?

Blogger TontoBubbaGoldstein June 10, 2013 3:56 PM  

Ain't got nuttin' on *my* South Carolina peeps.....

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2013/06/04/4084505/sc-man-cleared-of-burning-home.html

REPRESENT!!

Anonymous Poglavnik June 10, 2013 3:56 PM  

"Whose to say, really, that various cliques of teachers haven't already formed their own covens? Wouldn't surprise me that they are practicing a very subtle brand of witchcraft in which incremental attacks on children's self esteem is seen as life-giving".

That`s called education and cliques are unions.

Anonymous Clay June 10, 2013 4:03 PM  

@ anon123

Before, or after she was gang-banged by a train of Papuan studs?

Anonymous GreyS June 10, 2013 4:40 PM  

Nothing wrong with murdering a teacher or two if that's what is necessary. For proof of this, please go check up on Papua New Guinea's policy on killing teacher-witch doctors. Honestly, who are any of you to presume to tell anyone what to do or how to live?

Anonymous TheVillageIdiotRet June 10, 2013 4:40 PM  

Don't worry, the duck is O K.
DannyR

Blogger Unknown June 10, 2013 4:54 PM  

Allyn,
I spent two weeks in Rwanda and spoke to over 300 well known Evangelical pastors in Kigali and Kamembe. What the Rwandans understood about the Gospel in 1994 was little to nothing. Their understanding of Scripture was little to none and syncretism with primitive beliefs had made the Gospel undetectable. The good news is Evangelical Christianity is growing and the Rwandan people are getting a better grasp of the Gospel, though they do have a ways to go they're very hungry in understanding such things. The churches I attended saw Hutu's and Tutsi's standing side by side praising God. This point is worth making.

Anonymous Anonagain June 10, 2013 5:03 PM  

Papua New Guinean DNA did not received the evolutionary memo regarding morality.

Blogger TontoBubbaGoldstein June 10, 2013 5:53 PM  

Better than "Hot for teacher",well maybe not better,but a slight improvement.

I don't feel tardy.

Blogger TontoBubbaGoldstein June 10, 2013 6:05 PM  

The angry mob brandishing guns, machetes and axes surrounded her house and pulled Helen …

"A riot is an ugly thing... "
--Inspector Kemp

Have to wonder what the New Guineas(?) think of bankstas, lawyers, politicians and Bobby Ray Inman's successors. Diamond might be on to something after all.

Anonymous hausfrau June 10, 2013 7:30 PM  

"A teacher has been tortured and beheaded by her neighbours in a Papua New Guinea ...."
I take it they were homeschooling advocates.

Blogger beerme June 10, 2013 7:49 PM  

This comment has been removed by the author.

Blogger beerme June 10, 2013 7:51 PM  

The one thing we can learn from lesser cultures is the greatness of Western Civilization.

Anonymous Sensei June 10, 2013 7:54 PM  

White, very highly educated people in this country seem to be in the habit of violently murdering innocent people who get in their way too.

Except to do it in a socially acceptable fashion here, rather than labeling them witches, they call them fetuses.

We're all rather vibrant, it would seem.

Blogger pdwalker June 10, 2013 8:14 PM  

If you've worked in PNG for any length of time, you quickly come to realize that the people are uncivilizable barbarians.

Anonymous Toby Temple June 11, 2013 2:01 AM  

Vox! Nate!
What about the debate?
It's getting late
And I hate
to admit that its fate
Is the same
As the previous debate.


... I need more coffee..

Anonymous Rodrigo Borgia June 11, 2013 3:48 AM  

Ahh the Britons, while they lament the barbarism of foreign lands and yet stick their heads in their own gardens while the same barbarians roam the streets of London. How amusing.

Blogger Rantor June 11, 2013 5:31 AM  

But the New Guinea point of view is valid, because their value as human beings is valid.

Thus Sayeth BINKY.

Anonymous Orlok June 11, 2013 8:59 AM  

I didnt know they had Unitarians in Pau Pau New Guinea.

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