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Saturday, March 29, 2014

A failure of leadership

This is what happens when you buy into the tolerance trap and permit the lavender mafia entrance into your organization:
Employees and volunteers at Mozilla - the organisation which promotes open source software such as its Firefox browser - have called for new chief executive Brendan Eich to stand down because of his donations to political campaigns to ban gay marriage.

This week Mozilla named Brendan Eich as its new chief executive, following the resignation of Gary Kovacs which was announced in April last year. Eich was previously Mozilla's chief technology officer and has a long history with the group dating back to before its formation from Netscape, having worked on the Navigator browser in the 90s and creating JavaScript in a marathon, ten-day programming session in 1995.

The controversy stems from a $1,000 donation he made in 2008 to support California's Proposition 8, which opposed gay marriage. The donation was listed in a public database with Mozilla appearing next to Eich's name as his employer. It caused controversy in the technology industry when it was uncovered in 2012.

Eich posted on his own blog to "express my sorrow at having caused pain" and promised an "active commitment to equality" at Mozilla. "I am committed to ensuring that Mozilla is, and will remain, a place that includes and supports everyone, regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity, age, race, ethnicity, economic status, or religion," he wrote.

But employees were unconvinced. Chris McAvoy, who leads Mozilla's Open Badges project, took to Twitter last night to call for the new chief executive to stand down and said that he had been "disapointed" by his promotion. 
Eich is in over his head and clearly has no idea what he is dealing with here. He committed a major blunder with that statement; it's rather like watching a gamma male shot down by a woman respond by supplicating even harder.

What he should have done is fired everyone who called upon him to resign and announced that anyone who would permit their political ideology to interfere with their work at Mozilla or Mozilla's internal affairs would be fired. That would have brought the matter to a speedy close and prevented similar outbreaks of political insubordination. Instead, he poured gasoline on the fire by showing that he is vulnerable to ideological pressure.

When confronted by a pressure group, one should never apologize and never back down. Confront every challenger outside the organization and crush every challenger inside it. People respect strength and confidence in a leader, even when they disagree with him, because at least he shows that he is decisive and is capable of providing direction. Ironically, in his inept response to the attacks on him, Eich has shown that he is unfit for leadership because he is fundamentally a follower.

What he should have said is: "Like everyone else at Mozilla, I am free to donate to any political organization or cause I choose. It is no one's business here to tell me to whom I can and cannot donate my money, in the past or in the future. I have donated another $10,000 to [some anti-homogamy outfit], fired Mr. McAvoy for cause, and I will fire any other Mozilla employee or volunteer who publicly demands that this organization to cater to his personal political or ideological beliefs instead of pursuing our corporate objectives."

Labels: ,

118 Comments:

Anonymous Andy March 29, 2014 4:47 AM  

"When confronted by a pressure group, one should never apologize and never back down." Change that to 'When confronted by your woman about something, one should never apologize and never back down,' and the advice still holds. Cue great sex 30 minutes later when she calms down.

Leftists are women who don't have a man, women who don't have a man who's giving it to them well and effeminate men.

How do you deal with this group? Game. State control. Frame.

Anonymous tiredofitall March 29, 2014 4:55 AM  

"Leftists are women who don't have a man, women who don't have a man who's giving it to them well and effeminate men." - Andy

So...basically the leftist problem boils down to; lack of penis, lack of penis, like of penis?

Anonymous Andy March 29, 2014 5:42 AM  

I don't know. I'm just trying to figure this world out. I'll tell you what though. I think everyone who is able should expatriate. If only for the reason that organic, non-gmo food tastes a thousand times better.

Anonymous headshake March 29, 2014 5:45 AM  

So the guy who built js singlehandedly and helped create mozilla is being pressured by...who again?

Anonymous The Great Martini March 29, 2014 5:55 AM  

As much as I'm sure many on the Christian right might find that an attractive fantasy, to have a ruthless right wing Silicon Valley flagship corporation that would terminate any leftist meddling in corporate hierarchy, I strongly doubt it would fly. First of all, you would have a mass exodus of talent. You might like the metaphor, but personnel would pour off that company like rats off a sinking ship. Second, before that was even allowed to happen, the board would force the resignation of the CEO.

I'm not saying that what seems to be happening to him is justifiable. I just don't think the Caligula CEO thing would work.

Anonymous Vic March 29, 2014 6:00 AM  

I suppose this ends my use of the firefox browser from now on. Two can play this childish game you know.

Blogger Salt March 29, 2014 6:03 AM  

Time to be looking for a different browser.

Anonymous Homophobic March 29, 2014 6:05 AM  

The cocksuckers will someday bite off more than they can chew!

Anonymous zen0 March 29, 2014 6:20 AM  

I suppose this ends my use of the firefox browser from now on.

If you do that, make sure you let them know why., otherwise it has little effect.

Back in the day of snail mail, politicians counted one letter received and its opinion as representing 800 votes.

Anonymous Anti-Democracy Activist March 29, 2014 6:22 AM  

John Derbyshire is right - when leftists demand an apology, the only response available is to spit in their eye.

Look, this is how bullies - and the left is nothing if not a group of bullies - operate. Any softness, any apology, even any misplaced desire to be reasonable, is taken as a sign of weakness and as encouragement to victimize the target further. Any cowardice simply invites more of the same.

And yes, I did say that even being reasonable here is wrong. One has a responsibility to be reasonable with people who are acting in good faith. But being reasonable with people who will simply abuse your desire to be reasonable and use it as a weapon with which to try to destroy you is simple self-destruction.

What more exactly does the left have to do to prove that they do not operate in good faith, that they do not negotiate honestly, that they do not treat others as they wish to be treated, and that trying to be reasonable with them will get you nothing? How many more purges and Soviet-style forced public apologies will it take to get that point across?

I mean, it's gotten to the point where they're even turning on each other and trying to purge Stephen Colbert! The darling of bitchy leftist snark on television, and not even he is safe! I have no sympathy for him ("Serves you right", as Pilkington said to Napoleon), but if they feel so safe in their victory that they even feel confident enough to start purging prominent figures on their own side, things have gotten very bad indeed.

Phil Robertson was a good start, but more need to start standing up to them. If not, then we will all pay the price for our society's cowardice.

Blogger Cataline Sergius March 29, 2014 6:23 AM  

Game. State control. Frame.

Actually not a bad way of dealing with an organization like Mozilla. It makes me curious about how things are really done at Valve. A flat management scheme should be doomed to failure but Valve unlike Mozilla has thrived. Jeri Ellsworth (former (fired) employee) says Valve features "a hidden layer of powerful management structure." Cuurious indeed.

Regardless, I doubt if Mozilla can be saved, I've heard it's always been more of a family argument than a coherent organization.

Anonymous Peter Garstig March 29, 2014 6:29 AM  

In Zach's infamous words: "they say jump, and you say how high."

Not quite high enough, Mr. Eich.

Anonymous Peter Garstig March 29, 2014 6:33 AM  

So the guy who built js singlehandedly

At least, they would have a point with this.

Blogger Daniel Merritt March 29, 2014 6:40 AM  

"Say uncle"

"Uncle"

"Louder"

"Uncle!"

"Louder!"

OpenID cailcorishev March 29, 2014 6:47 AM  

First of all, you would have a mass exodus of talent.

No you wouldn't. While many tech types would categorize themselves as liberal, it's an "it's mean to tell people what to do" soft liberalism. They're not going to quit their jobs because their boss defends himself against this kind of attack. If they were that hardcore liberal, they wouldn't be working for him in the first place.

We're often told that an institution -- the Catholic Church, the Republican Party, now Mozilla -- must compromise with liberals or perish. It's a lie. The perishing is a result of the compromise, not the alternative to it.

Blogger James Dixon March 29, 2014 6:50 AM  

> First of all, you would have a mass exodus of talent

Considering the relative quality of the Firefox browser over the past few years, i"d say they need a massive influx of talent.

Anonymous Lucius March 29, 2014 6:51 AM  

A "do unto others" reframe would work too if you wanted a less combative route.

Blogger James Dixon March 29, 2014 6:54 AM  

But yeah, he made a political contribution. If they have a problem with that, the appropriate responses are 1) what do they have against democracy, 2) it's a free country, and if they have a problem with that they should leave, and 3) if they want to make it personal, you'll see them in the parking lot after work.

Anonymous scoobius dubious March 29, 2014 7:04 AM  

"If not, then we will all pay the price for our society's cowardice."

What society? I don't see any society.

Anonymous Anti-Democracy Activist March 29, 2014 7:08 AM  

"The objection will be made that that imposing the morality of the many will result in the oppression of the few. But we now have the oppression of the many by the morality of the few. And perhaps the depravity of the few is such as to need repressing. When all has been said, the question remains: Somebody's morals are going to be imposed. Ours, or theirs?" - Fred Reed

(It's a quote from a longer column - one that, though written before 9/11, is even more relevant today that it was back then. Here it is in its entirety: http://www.fredoneverything.net/No.shtml )

Blogger Eric March 29, 2014 7:14 AM  

What a fool. He did the one thing guaranteed to cost him his job.

Anonymous questioning March 29, 2014 7:15 AM  

A bit off topic. But i suggest looking up the latest article at "twelfth bough" compare and contrast the leadership styles of Putin and Obama. Really drives it home.

Blogger Hermit March 29, 2014 7:27 AM  

They are fanatics, they accept no compromise. His apologies will not give him a better working environment, they will continue to hate him for being an "evil homophobic bigot".

That said using the iron fist is the best things to do but one should be prepared for the whining that would foollow. It is obvious that the gaystapo members will create a shitstorm after being fired with the help of their pink comrades in the media.

Anonymous MrGreenMan March 29, 2014 8:10 AM  

With his board having split with three in favor of him and three against, he is probably pretty secure for now.

Blogger Cataline Sergius March 29, 2014 8:14 AM  

Chris McAvoy, who leads Mozilla's Open Badges project took to Twitter last night to call for the new chief executive to stand down

I was more than little curious about what the Open Badges Project was and why it was so clearly vital to Mozilla's future, that Chris McAvoy felt absolutely safe and secure when demanding that his boss deliver unto the clearly all powerful Chris, his own crowned head.

Here is Open Badges. http://openbadges.org/

Okay, I'm still not sure what it is or what it is supposed to accomplish, other than keep Chris McAvoy employed.

This tweet is from McAvoy's own feed. It's important to note that I'm fortunate to work at a place like @mozilla where I can say that without fear of retribution.

That in a nutshell, is Mozilla's biggest problem.

OpenID simplytimothy March 29, 2014 8:17 AM  

Vox, these mini-lessons that you are providing are much appreciated. They provide situational awareness; SA is critical when managing a complex situation.

I am very new to what Vox is quite fluent at, but as a neophyte, I am amazed at how easily they crumble when confronted.

Let me qualify that by saying you cannot bullshit your way through something you know nothing about--TENS in my case--but for something as simple as freedom of association and "its none of your goddamn business" simply standing like a man gets the job done.

Anonymous HongKongCharlie March 29, 2014 8:29 AM  

The Great Martini March 29, 2014 5:55 AM

" As much as I'm sure many on the Christian right might find that an attractive fantasy, to have a ruthless right wing Silicon Valley flagship corporation"

I find it interesting that you would find the need to erect something to rail against. I failed to find anything about the Christian Right in his post. I sure would like enlightenment. For all we know he might be an atheist Democrat who simply believes strongly enough in the family concept of man and wife (female of course).

Are you against a person backing his beliefs with a check?
.
HKC

Anonymous Logan March 29, 2014 8:33 AM  

When I read about things like this I'm tempted to just follow Henry David Thoreau's lead. I want to distance myself from bullies who claim to be tolerant yet threaten you to share their political beliefs or suffer the consequences. I feel like if I don't then it's doubtful that I'll ever achieve any semblance of peace of mind in this life.

Blogger Manach March 29, 2014 8:36 AM  

Genuinely curious to discover the type of Browser product that is purged of any conservative influences and worked on by ideological acceptance left-wing types.

Blogger njartist March 29, 2014 8:40 AM  

I used Firefox's feedback option to register my disgust. I wonder how long that option will remain available?
Feedback is available from the help file.

Blogger tz March 29, 2014 8:54 AM  

Compare Apple with Tim Cook proudly opposing religious freedom laws and the earlier Steve Jobs.

Blogger tz March 29, 2014 8:57 AM  

Compare Apple with Tim Cook proudly opposing religious freedom laws and the earlier Steve Jobs.

Anonymous Dr. J March 29, 2014 8:58 AM  

you would have a mass exodus of talent

Leftists aren't talented.

OpenID simplytimothy March 29, 2014 9:02 AM  

I used Firefox's feedback option to register my disgust. I wonder how long that option will remain available?
Feedback is available from the help file.


Disgust registered!

Anonymous Michael March 29, 2014 9:02 AM  

This is the stuff that pisses me off just as much as the gay activists: pro-traditional people who cower in fear when confronted by the bullies on the left. It's like apologizing to deviant perverts for being a normal person. >:I

Anonymous Noah B. March 29, 2014 9:03 AM  

Eich has shown a staggering level of incompetence here. He may be technically gifted, but this is not what a leader does. Firing everyone who publicly called for his resignation is a no-brainer.

Blogger IM2L844 March 29, 2014 9:05 AM  

...personnel would pour off that company like rats off a sinking ship.

I don't think so. It only seems that way because everyone has been duped into believing a tiny minority occupies the authoritative high ground while the vast majority has no recourse but to accede to the pressure. This crap will stop when the bluffs start getting called and everyone sees the sky didn't fall.

Anonymous Cold Calculus March 29, 2014 9:17 AM  

@Cataline regarding OpenBadges.

I looked at the About page: an Open Badge is simply a Boy Scout Merit Badge analog. *Anyone* can create an Open Badge as their construction is based on open standards.

What a Black Knight opportunity. How about the Machiavelli Badge? The 10th Amendment Badge? The Gender Freedom Badge? The Unfairness Is The Only Fairness Badge? The Founding Fathers Badge?

Black Knight CEOs and developers, take it away.

Anonymous Godfrey March 29, 2014 9:42 AM  

Homosexuals are becoming as popular as the plague. I've gone from tolerance a decade or so ago to the realization that it is a deep narcissistic psychological disorder.

Anonymous Will Best March 29, 2014 10:02 AM  

First of all, you would have a mass exodus of talent. You might like the metaphor, but personnel would pour off that company like rats off a sinking ship. Second, before that was even allowed to happen, the board would force the resignation of the CEO.

What happens when a couple hundred tech guys go looking for a job during a recession at the same time? He isn't firing people for their political beliefs he is firing them for disrupting corporate operations.

Two, the CEO is more likely to lose his job because as has been demonstrated they are now empowered, and unsatisfied with their pound of flesh.


I suppose this ends my use of the firefox browser from now on. Two can play this childish game you know.

Its not like any other browser maker demonstrates any backbone

Anonymous Jack Amok March 29, 2014 10:28 AM  

This tweet is from McAvoy's own feed. It's important to note that I'm fortunate to work at a place like @mozilla where I can say that without fear of retribution.

Huh. Too bad Brendan Eich doesn't work at a place like that.

Anonymous Noah B. March 29, 2014 10:28 AM  

I had a feeling that something strange was happening at Mozilla based on how radically the version numbering of Firefox has changed. Not that long ago I was on version 3.X.X, and I just today downloaded version 28. Whatever happened to the idea that a new version number was supposed to indicate a major change or redesign of software?

Blogger IM2L844 March 29, 2014 10:30 AM  

Germane to this issue is this excellent guest host monologue by Dana Loesch from GBTV.

Anonymous rycamor March 29, 2014 11:03 AM  

Poor, poor Brendan Eich. I was afraid of this the moment I saw his apology. A genuinely good guy, who was instrumental--I mean absolutely instrumental--in keeping the Web open, back when Microsoft and Adobe almost turned it into another walled garden.

Unless he gets a spine, fast, the Mozilla project is going to turn into a disaster. There is already obviously a ridiculous amount of wasted energy, but there are some really good things being worked on there. Javascript 2.0 alone could be a game-changer if it is done right.

Anonymous johnc March 29, 2014 11:17 AM  

Let's be serious here. This guy is barely going to keep his job by the skin of his teeth. Rare are the times that you cross the lavender mafia and don't end up dead.

This isn't the 50s here, folks... The left-wing kooks are in control of everything. At this stage, fighting is martyrdom.

Blogger James Dixon March 29, 2014 11:28 AM  

> I used Firefox's feedback option to register my disgust...

Thanks for the suggestion. Comment sent.

> Whatever happened to the idea that a new version number was supposed to indicate a major change or redesign of software?

Chrome happened.

Anonymous FP March 29, 2014 11:37 AM  

Tis a shame. Firefox has been going down hill for awhile, losing out to chrome. The big change in the default UI is coming with the next version 29 which is in beta, "Australis". Other options based on mozilla code are Pale Moon and Waterfox.

As for being reasonable, I think that is the biggest lesson I've learned in the past ten years or so. The progressives are the intolerant fanatics they claim to be fighting.

Anonymous Josh March 29, 2014 11:44 AM  

Let's be serious here. This guy is barely going to keep his job by the skin of his teeth. Rare are the times that you cross the lavender mafia and don't end up dead.

This isn't the 50s here, folks... The left-wing kooks are in control of everything. At this stage, fighting is martyrdom.


Chick Fil A is doing fine.

So is Phil Robertson.

Blogger frigger611 March 29, 2014 11:47 AM  

No need to use the word "mass" when also using the word "exodus."

"Exodus" is just fine on its own, (the "mass" part is already included in its definition).

Signed, Cliff Claven

Anonymous rycamor March 29, 2014 11:53 AM  

Eich is a serious geek, of the type the world needs more of. Say what you will about Javascript, but creating such a clean, simple language in 10 days back when the only "simple" languages were Visual Basic, Bash, and Cobol--that's not a trivial thing. No, don't tell me he should have embedded Lisp or Java in the browser.

And for all Javascript's faults, Eich's proposed changes for 2.0 pretty much blow those out of the water. In fact, current JS embedded in Firefox is really almost Javascript 2.0. And, it is much, much better than the Javascript engine in Chrome or Opera.

Eich has also been working on a serious competitor to Google's Go: the Rust programming language. Sigh... unfortunate the name is... but some very nice concepts at work there.

Anonymous Will Best March 29, 2014 11:58 AM  

Chick Fil A is doing fine.

So is Phil Robertson.


And the second they stood tall, you didn't hear anything about them. Why? Because the left doesn't want to give people a "how to" manual.

Blogger rycamor March 29, 2014 12:12 PM  

@Will Best

Ha! So true.

Anonymous jack March 29, 2014 12:14 PM  

@James...Considering the relative quality of the Firefox browser over the past few years, i"d say they need a massive influx of talent.

My FireFox has a mixed relationship with this Visa laptop I'm using. I always attributed it to MS playing their usual games with competitors. Maybe some things not so right in FireFox? Maybe. The huge thing I see as bad here, apart from the mistake of backing down to these freaks, is that Eich, as head guy, might have the power to make some good changes to Firefox. Maybe he will grow a pair.

OpenID cailcorishev March 29, 2014 12:40 PM  

Chick Fil A is doing fine.

So is Phil Robertson.


Exactly. Besides, once they have you in their sights, what do you have to lose? It's been proven over and over that no amount of groveling will satisfy them. It might -- might -- save his job, but at the cost of rejecting his own principles, and he'd always have two strikes against him in the future. On the other hand, as you point out, when you stand up to them, at least sometimes they shut up and go away.

Eich doesn't need Mozilla. Even if the left is so powerful in the tech field that he couldn't get another job without debasing himself (which it's not, but let's pretend), he could go independent or freelance and do just fine. Maybe not at the same salary he's getting now, but it's not like he'd be homeless. Which would you prefer: be in the top 10% of incomes and have your self-respect and the freedom to spend your wealth where you like, or in the top .1% and have to lie and kiss the ass of people who hate you every day to keep it?

No, don't tell me he should have embedded Lisp or Java in the browser.

Heh. I was disappointed that none of the client-side Perl projects worked out, but Perl's probably too malleable to ever work well in the browser. You'd have to restrict it so much to be safe enough that it wouldn't be itself anymore. I've done my share of cussing about Javascript, but it's really a pretty interesting language with some nice features when you get into it.

Anonymous Rolf March 29, 2014 12:43 PM  

Jack - Exactly my thoughts. I wonder if he broke his irony meter when he said that. He's happy to work at a place where he can say what he wants to without fear, he just wants everyone else to tremble in fear of retribution for disagreeing with him.
That's industrial-strength irony in the twenty-megaton range.

Blogger rycamor March 29, 2014 12:53 PM  

@Cail

Heh. I was disappointed that none of the client-side Perl projects worked out, but Perl's probably too malleable to ever work well in the browser.

Oh no you din't! The last thing we would have needed is worrying about sigils and implicit variables and all that other Perl oddness in a browser language. Parsing http streams is enough trouble already. The only realistic contenders would have been something like Lua, or maybe Python.

Blogger IM2L844 March 29, 2014 1:06 PM  

fighting is martyrdom.

That's the smoke and mirrors/sleight of hand leftist bullshit that tricked the super majority into allowing the indiscriminate picayune minority to assume the undeserved positions of milk monitors, crossing guards and team captains in the first place. Guess what.That emperor has no clothes, but if martyrdom is what it takes, so be it.

Anonymous LES March 29, 2014 1:15 PM  

This is about more than Brendan Eich. It is also about discouraging others like him from being politically active for conservative values. Most folks would rather avoid unnecessary confrontation.

OpenID cailcorishev March 29, 2014 1:20 PM  

@rycamor,

I'll go to my grave liking sigils, but yeah, Perl is too far over on the "do it however you like and the interpreter will try to make it work" end of things for a browser language. I've even learned some things from Javascript that made my Perl better, like using first-class functions and closures to get object-like behavior when full OO isn't necessary. And frameworks like jQuery make browser programming almost pleasant.

Anonymous Alt Numlock March 29, 2014 1:21 PM  

"What happens when a couple hundred tech guys go looking for a job during a recession at the same time?"

And what happens to the employment prospects of those 200 when it is surmised that they left Mozilla as some sort of political protest? Who in their right mind would want to hire disruptive political agitators?

Anonymous Noah B. March 29, 2014 1:33 PM  

"This isn't the 50s here, folks... The left-wing kooks are in control of everything. At this stage, fighting is martyrdom."

That's exactly what they want you to think. Just stand up to them, DO NOT APOLOGIZE, and they scurry away like roaches running for the dark corners when the lights come up.

Anonymous damntull March 29, 2014 1:49 PM  

My response to Vox's proposed statement:

Huzzah!

Blogger MidKnight March 29, 2014 2:10 PM  

Yeah.

Mozilla as an org, after this, will be suspect in their ability to deliver a quality product by anyone who doesn't think good programming only comes from those who agree with leftist ideology on all points - because they have now made it clear that ideology trumps good results in their organization. I believe Vox has it entirely right even if I'd consider my wording on how to announce it.

Oddly - Tim Cooks response at the meeting leads me to believe Apple will continue to do well, even if I personally would have found a way to express a disdain for "short term" profits by pointing out that the company rarely worked to maximize short term returns rather than scoffing at warming skeptics. It has a history of dumping successful products when it thinks is has something better rather than milking every last cent out of it. I think all too many corporations don't take the long view in maintaining PR, and keeping their options open, whereas Apple, for better or for worse, has not rested on its laurels. Exploring options for more efficient manufacturing techniques and keeping its workers happier can be spun as a viable long term strategy to keep them profitable in the long haul, not to increase their margins this next year.

Blogger MidKnight March 29, 2014 2:11 PM  

Also - I think it is important to note that now he's making it easier for them to bully his successor too...

Anonymous The other skeptic March 29, 2014 2:36 PM  

"#CancelColbert because white liberals are just as complicit in making Asian Americans into punchlines and we aren't amused," she tweeted.

Schadenfreude ... not to mention that Paragon of Integrity, Leland Yee.

Anonymous rho March 29, 2014 2:36 PM  

rycamor:
Eich is a serious geek, of the type the world needs more of. Say what you will about Javascript, but creating such a clean, simple language in 10 days back when the only "simple" languages were Visual Basic, Bash, and Cobol--that's not a trivial thing. No, don't tell me he should have embedded Lisp or Java in the browser.

Current practices in Javascript is to write everything with closures. They should have embedded Lisp, or at least a version of it properly sandboxed.

VD is right. Eich's immediate response to dissension in the ranks would have been to request the ringleaders' resignations. If they are unable to separate the personal from their employment, they are not a good fit. And it likely wouldn't affect normal operations. It's just as likely, if not more likely, that it would signal a change in direction that is more focused and more professional--a public image that would be good for Mozilla. Their Firefox OS is going nowhere because Mozilla is not perceived as a company with a direction and strong leadership.

Of course, for everybody else who is not Mozilla, the takeaway lesson is "Never hire a leftist." If the Left is itching for a culture war, I suggest their wish should be granted.

Anonymous Androsynth March 29, 2014 2:38 PM  

The Great Martini wrote:

a ruthless right wing Silicon Valley flagship corporation

So, any corporation that doesn't demand strict adherence to leftist political orthodoxy as a condition for employment is ruthlessly right wing?

There was a point not so long ago where someone's voting habits were not only nobody else's business, but utterly irrelevant to an apolitical corporate entity. This was not considered "right wing", simply "sane and normal".

Those who think that people who do not support their politics deserve to be shunned out of all employment, and civilization itself, are twisted and sick, but I suppose we're at the stage of leftist political metastasization where its doctrine frantically tries to insert itself into the last few functioning organs of society before the host dies entire. Desperation precedes irrelevance.

Blogger Danby March 29, 2014 2:41 PM  

Mr McAvoy says he's glad he works for a company where he can speak his mind without fear of retribution. He should be. I know I am. The difference is that I would like to keep it that way, and Mr McAvoy wants to turn this into a company where disagreeing with Mr McAvoy is grounds for termination. I don't think that's the best or most profitable way forward for the company..

Since Mr McAvoy finds it intolerable to work for someone he disagrees with, and since I am not going anywhere, I have resolved the situation by asking for his resignation. He will be leaving the company effective Monday, with or without it."

Blogger Tommy Hass March 29, 2014 2:41 PM  

Vox strategy is actually good.

Even better would be to point out that a large percentage of black people agreed with prop "hate". Wonder how these pajamaboys will crawl out of this one.

Blogger Hanns Strudle extra gooey March 29, 2014 2:48 PM  

So when's the enivatable backlash a-comin' from the people in this world who are sick of Gays? It's gone beyond trying to tolerate them. It's beyond the phase of hating what they do in the bedroom but being nice to them socially. They will keep coming and keep trying to take over every aspect of society unless there is some offense on our part.

Anonymous Michael March 29, 2014 2:49 PM  

"As for being reasonable, I think that is the biggest lesson I've learned in the past ten years or so. The progressives are the intolerant fanatics they claim to be fighting." - FP

Quoted for truth.

Blogger RobertT March 29, 2014 3:10 PM  

" When confronted by a pressure group, one should never apologize and never back down. "

This is absolutely correct. In fact, in my opinion, you should never back down or apologize to anyone who does not have your best interests at heart ... and even then you have to watch what you say ... regardless of what you did or how you did it ... If you do say the word "sorry", say it as an insult. But I recommend never saying the word and saying something like this instead ... "Maybe that wasn't a good idea." or "Maybe I shouldn't have said that." or "That didn't come out right; but you know what I mean." Remember you're talking to a wider audience. Maybe you would like to soothe the feelings of the person right in front of you, but if you go too far, everyone will hear about it and they will think you're a loser. In the back of their minds they'll know you'll back down and they'll lose respect for you.

That's what killed this guy. That's what kills everyone who backs down or apologizes. People will follow a lion, but they won't follow a mouse.

Anonymous Dr. Kenneth Noisewater March 29, 2014 3:45 PM  

Mozilla will be fine, there's plenty of femcoders out there to replace Eich.

Blogger Outlaw X March 29, 2014 3:58 PM  

Unintended consequences of stupid laws. Just like Voter ID in TX. Now they swipe your drivers license and it spits out a code you have to enter into a voting machine to vote. Now they know who you are and who or what you voted for.

Anonymous rho March 29, 2014 4:55 PM  

Interestingly, three board members resigned after Eich was named CEO:

http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2014/03/28/three-mozilla-board-members-resign-over-choice-of-new-ceo/

It doesn't seem to be over the Prop 8 donation, and more about looking outside the company for the position.

Anonymous The other skeptic March 29, 2014 6:12 PM  

Others taking advantage of this little problem.

Anonymous Cs March 29, 2014 7:57 PM  

"As much as I'm sure many on the Christian right might find that an attractive fantasy..."

That's a crock and you're projection of ruthless intolerant leftist behavior onto Christians doesn't hold water.

"To have a ruthless right wing Silicon Valley flagship corporation that would terminate any leftist meddling in corporate hierarchy, I strongly doubt it would fly."

Ye of little faith, if you have the right leadership it can certainly fly. The problems are always top down.

"First of all, you would have a mass exodus of talent. You might like the metaphor, but personnel would pour off that company like rats off a sinking ship."

Gee that belies Vox's expulsion from the SFWA and the creation of Castilia House. The left doesn't have a corner on talent, you forget that the U.S. was built during much more conservative times and is coming undone during the rise of libtardism. Next!



Anonymous Cs March 29, 2014 7:59 PM  

Correction: Castalia House

Anonymous The other skeptic March 29, 2014 8:09 PM  

Maybe he can also apologize for this outrageous opinion by Brazilians.

Anonymous Cs March 29, 2014 8:25 PM  

"I just don't think the Caligula CEO thing would work."

So you're saying Christians would act like Caligula!? What a contradictory analogy!

Anonymous The other skeptic March 29, 2014 8:38 PM  

While managers want female engineers (and maybe gay ones, who knows) the reality is that most females with CS degrees head for social media offerings.

Which means, I believe, that social media companies are headed for trouble.

Blogger Danby March 29, 2014 9:29 PM  

Social Media is dead. It's easy to get participation, impossible to monetize. Facebook is in the process of "controlled flight into terrain." Google makes money from everything except it's oh so many social media offerings.

Anonymous Cs March 29, 2014 9:48 PM  

This ties in with the previous article on multiculturalism. Diversity + proximity = WAR. Well being pathologically hypocritical the left forces people to get along with those that are culturally different but when it come to people on the right they don't practice diversity.

Anonymous Cs March 29, 2014 9:51 PM  

"What more exactly does the left have to do to prove that they do not operate in good faith, that they do not negotiate honestly, that they do not treat others as they wish to be treated, and that trying to be reasonable with them will get you nothing? How many more purges and Soviet-style forced public apologies will it take to get that point across?"

Excellent, totally spot on.

Anonymous Noah B. March 29, 2014 9:53 PM  

"Unintended consequences of stupid laws. Just like Voter ID in TX. Now they swipe your drivers license and it spits out a code you have to enter into a voting machine to vote. Now they know who you are and who or what you voted for."

Ideally, we would have both anonymity and integrity in the voting system, but it doesn't seem to be possible to have both. It seems to me that the integrity of the vote has to be the first priority.

Anonymous G&S March 29, 2014 9:57 PM  

"And yes, I did say that even being reasonable here is wrong. One has a responsibility to be reasonable with people who are acting in good faith. But being reasonable with people who will simply abuse your desire to be reasonable and use it as a weapon with which to try to destroy you is simple self-destruction."

God doesn't play their game either...

"To the pure you show yourself pure, but to the devious you show yourself shrewd." Psalm 18:26


Anonymous dh March 29, 2014 10:21 PM  

Compare Javascript to OpenBadges. Which technical person would you follow? A person responsible for... nothing. Or a person responsible for... the core of modern web UI.

It's just like the feminist fat frogs dictating who should be kicked out of SFWA. The least valuable selecting the most valuable for exclusion.

Anonymous Congo Sam March 29, 2014 10:26 PM  

You can't just go firing people. There would be morale issues. But it was a horrific mistake to apologize.

Eich is a big deal. Very few living men have invented important, seminal programming languages. JS is a Big Deal. Yeah, python, ruby, they're quite good languages, but JS was first and is a more simple, perfect[1] and beautiful design. If there was an OO dynamic language before JS, it wasn't important.

This guy can sit at the table with Ritchie and Stroustrup. His enemies? Submicroscopic nonentities.

That being said, aside from client side web stuff, I spend more scripting time in Perl.

[1] it has flaws -- the newline mess, the == mess.

Anonymous Jack Amok March 29, 2014 10:31 PM  

Tis a shame. Firefox has been going down hill for awhile

Well, when you don't actually have a business model, that tends to happen.

As for being reasonable, I think that is the biggest lesson I've learned in the past ten years or so. The progressives are the intolerant fanatics they claim to be fighting.

"We are the people we've been hating for?"

Anonymous David of One March 29, 2014 11:19 PM  

What a quote Jack!

"We are the people we've been hating for?"

Did you come up this yourself? If so, I did a cursory search on Google and Bing ... it would appear that you are the only one that, at least by these two search engines, has made a great statement juxtapositioning the the Haters that hate those that don't hate despite always being accused of hating.

OT: Has anyone else had problems posting with Chrome while using Name/URL? Seems very strange using two Google packages and experiencing that "Publish" doesn't publish but clears the comment entry.

Also, it should be noted that select the back arrow and then selecting the forward arrow in the browser will restore you comment entry so you cut and paste it on a different browser. Sometimes you need to do it twice to get your unpublished text to reappear.

Anonymous IG-88A March 29, 2014 11:43 PM  

The discovery of a "gay" gene... along with a Syphon Filter bio-weapon... can not arrive soon enough.

Blogger rycamor March 29, 2014 11:52 PM  

dh March 29, 2014 10:21 PM
Compare Javascript to OpenBadges. Which technical person would you follow? A person responsible for... nothing. Or a person responsible for... the core of modern web UI.


This lack of perspective is what the bunnies would consider a feature rather than a bug. They dream of a world where there is zero downside to any choice, and everyone's accomplishments (er rather... efforts) are valued only for their intentions rather than actual outcomes.

Anonymous Snowflake March 30, 2014 12:05 AM  

"confidence" will only get you so far, if too great a percentage of your decisions are stupid. People might follow leader X, for a while, if he is instantly able, when asked what they should do to get food, give them a confident sounding answer. However, if his confident answers never result in food (or result in food only a very small percentage of times) at some point those people who are interested in feeding themselves and their children are going to switch to leader Y, who may take a few days to give them an answer about how to get food, and may not sound confident about his answers, provided that the answers he gives provide enough food enough of the time to keep from starving to death.

Whether or not the people will later switch allegience to Leader Z, who is able to give confident answers that also provide food is a seperate question.

Anonymous The CronoLink March 30, 2014 12:11 AM  

Is there any browser as good or better than Firefox with similar stuff like noscript or requestpolicy?

Anonymous dh March 30, 2014 12:17 AM  

Crono--

Not really. There are people doing good things with linux and the gpl chrome code base. Iceweasel, for example, is perfectly acceptable.

Firefox is pretty much where it is. The problem for Mozilla as a company is going to be funding, long-term, is a serious problem. Google used to indirectly fund most of it, but thats over. It's pretty much no good options going forward.

Anonymous The other skeptic March 30, 2014 12:52 AM  

Iceweasel, for example, is perfectly acceptable."

Yeah, but the Iceweasel folks support the fudge packers too and are happy to take business away from Mozilla.

Anonymous Anti-Democracy Activist March 30, 2014 1:00 AM  

Initially, I actually differed with Vox on whether this McAvoy guy should actually be fired. But as they say so often these days, my views have evolved. Now I think Vox is right.

There's an old saying: If you shoot an arrow at the king, don't miss. That's not a threat. That's not tyranny. It's just the reality of power. And that's as it should be.

Because if you can shoot an arrow at the king and miss, and there are no real consequences, then there's no real downside risk to for anybody to take a shot at the king. Which means that a thousand more arrows will follow, as every potential usurper out there takes their own shot. Why not? You might get lucky and hit the target. And if you don't, then you've lost basically nothing.

This result, of course, will be chaos - a king who lives in constant fear because he can never be reasonably sure that he won't end the day with an arrow in his back, and a populace that lives in fear because they can never be reasonably sure who the king will be at the end of the day. A destabilized society wracked with violence and plagued with usurpation attempts by every petty hanger-on benefits nobody. As Martin once said, when nobles play the game of thrones, it's the smallfolk who suffer most.

But yes, of course, we are not medieval nobles. So how does this all apply to us?

The principles are remarkably similar, actually. McAvoy took his shot at the king. He may hit the target, or he may miss. But if he misses and there are no real consequences, expect a thousand more arrows to follow. And not just at Mozilla. Everywhere.

The result will, of course, be chaos, but that is to the advantage of those who thrive on chaos (or at least on a lack of order). Even if McAvoy misses, if there are no real consequences, he still wins. He will win because the king will live in fear - and not just Eich, but all like him. That will be the last time Eich donates to a cause that annoys the Lavender Mafia, or any other leftist group. Many more CEOs, board members, and executives will follow suit. For the left, which at the moment relies on purges, shaming sessions, and other types of soft tyranny, the chilling effects that this will have will be enough (for now, at least). And if this incident wasn't enough to install the terror necessary to silence the opposition, remember that there will now be a thousand more arrows will follow. Some will hit kings, others will doubtless miss, but if there remain no real consequences, then they will continue because there are only upsides to them continuing and no downsides. If the people who fire the arrows hit, they win; if they miss, they win - as long as they can keep increasing the fear by continuing to fire arrows at kings, they win.

Unless some king puts a stop to it - definitively, unmistakably, and very publicly. Unless some king makes an example of those who fire arrows at kings to sow fear and chaos.

I think Mr. McAvoy is a fine place to start.

Blogger rycamor March 30, 2014 1:40 AM  

dh March 30, 2014 12:17 AM

Crono--

Not really. There are people doing good things with linux and the gpl chrome code base. Iceweasel, for example, is perfectly acceptable.

Firefox is pretty much where it is. The problem for Mozilla as a company is going to be funding, long-term, is a serious problem. Google used to indirectly fund most of it, but thats over. It's pretty much no good options going forward.


Sad, really. Especially when you think of the rich ecosystem of add-ons apps that are hosted by Mozilla but for which they make absolutely nothing. At some point they made a half-hearted stab at an app store but it looks like the apps are nowhere near as good as what you get in the Firefox add-ons manager, and it looks like they haven't even gotten around to monetizing it yet, as all the apps are free. And the site itself is barely usable, since there is no categorization.

Mozilla needs to figure out their best asset and re-evaluate how they present it to the world. I think they should capitalize on Javascript itself. The Javascript engine at the core of Firefox is much more mature and elegant than Google Chrome's V8 engine, and its capabilities are really underrated. The one BIG thing missing is a decent server-side framework to take advantage of it. V8 has node.js, which has certain capabilities but in general is an annoying framework and limited by its architecture. If Mozilla figured out a server-side platform with a more general appeal, and which could tie into all the areas needed for serious web application development, it would be a game-changer. I would drop my other server-side solutions in an instant. Think about it: native JSON parsing, native DOM manipulation (it's very useful for the server to grok documents exactly the way the client does), and an optimized-path JIT compiler with all the features added since JS 1.7.

Then Mozilla could monetize that offering simply by creating a cloud hosting solution similar to Amazon S3, not to mention all the big corporate consulting contracts.

The other big then Mozilla could do is XUL Redux. Xulrunner sits there largely unused. XUL had an initial impact as a client-side interface solution for stand-alone apps. In fact, I spent 4 years developing and supporting a standalone XUL app. It died due to major misunderstandings about how to capitalize on it. Since then, literally *nothing* has come along that could do what XUL did: completely cross-platform GUI development without compilation, with Javascript-on-steroids for the programming language. Sad.

Anonymous A March 30, 2014 5:45 AM  

Yeah, python, ruby, they're quite good languages, but JS was first

Python predates JavaScript by several years. Ruby and JavaScript appeared in the same year.

Blogger IM2L844 March 30, 2014 7:00 AM  

You can't just go firing people. There would be morale issues.

Of course you can. Any insubordination or attempting to incite insubordination would be just cause for dismissal.

But it was a horrific mistake to apologize.

Yes. Eich would have done well to remember that Prop 8 passed. His apology was unnecessary and offensive to the many. He should have just responded by tweeting, "Shut up, Tad!".

Someone should copyright "Shut up, Tad!" and take my money for two T-shirts and a coffee mug. Oh, and can I get a Castalia House logo on the back of the T-shirts?

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus March 30, 2014 10:01 AM  

Brendan Eich earns the Viktor Yanukovych Award for political courage.

Blogger James Dixon March 30, 2014 10:20 AM  

> Is there any browser as good or better than Firefox with similar stuff like noscript or requestpolicy?

The big three are IE, Chrome, and Firefox. Opera is a distant fourth. None of the others approach Firefox's flexibility. Chrome may have some equivalent plugins, but nothing as good as NoScript.

Seamonkey support was picked up by another group some time ago, though it's still downloadable via the Mozilla site. It has NoScript support, so you might want to take a look a tit.

> Someone should copyright "Shut up, Tad!" and take my money for two T-shirts and a coffee mug.

Zazzle and CafePress are waiting for you. :) And you can sell them to others.

Anonymous Jack Amok March 30, 2014 12:16 PM  

"We are the people we've been hating for?"

Did you come up this yourself?


Yes, it seemed natural enough. The left isn't so much Pogo's "We have met the enemy and he is us"* but more like "we're the evil bastards we've been warning ourselves about." The projection is strong with them.

The big three are IE, Chrome, and Firefox. Opera is a distant fourth

Opera, at least on a PC, is a disaster. The problem with Firefox is - ironically - all the "security" features it has. They suffer from the traditional security mentality of blocking anything that might be dangerous. Well, you can make a computer perfectly secure by unplugging it and filling the case with cement. That solution has some application compatibility issues though...

There are better ways to do security, but unfortunately all the security "experts" at the major players are locked into the old, dysfunctional model.


* BTW, Walt Kelly first used that phrase as part of an eco-guilt trip poster for Earth Day back in the 70's, though in those days it was perhaps more justified than now.

Blogger James Dixon March 30, 2014 12:39 PM  

> There are better ways to do security,

There are ways to do security that result in a more usable system. Whether they are "better" or not is debatable. They can be, until that one zero day java attack gets through and takes down your entire network. Security and usability are almost always a tradeoff.

Blogger Hector March 30, 2014 2:08 PM  

I wonder if things would be different if he had donated to Prop 8 and Prop 8 didn't pass. Would everyone still be upset or is it that they lost at the ballot box that rankles them?

Anonymous Jack Amok March 30, 2014 3:10 PM  

Security and usability are almost always a tradeoff.

But usability is why people buy computers, so if your security model requires that particular trade-off, then you will have no security because a secure but unusable system is worthless. People will always eventually trade away security to achieve usability, if that's what you require.

That's what I mean by "locked into the old, dysfunctional model."

Anonymous Jack Amok March 30, 2014 3:14 PM  

And frankly the fact that a "zero day java attack" is a real danger is testament to the busted nature of the brittle lock and key system we use today.


Anonymous Sothern March 30, 2014 3:38 PM  

So I wonder which worthless PC shitlickers Mozilla has hired. Mozilla has become as buggy & crappy as MSux/FagBook/Gaggle, etc. BTW check out Pando's articles on the scumbag Tech Bosses colluding to shortchange their employees for $Billions!

Blogger James Dixon March 30, 2014 6:15 PM  

> But usability is why people buy computers, so if your security model requires that particular trade-off, then you will have no security because a secure but unusable system is worthless

By George, I believe he's got it. :)

But that's why it's a tradeoff. The ideally secure system is unusable. The totally usable system is so insecure it quickly becomes unusable. Take pretty much any standard home installation of Windows as an example. I cleaned up a Windows 8 machine recently. They took it home Friday. They brought it back in on Monday with another infection. :)

> And frankly the fact that a "zero day java attack" is a real danger is testament to the busted nature of the brittle lock and key system we use today.

You'll get no argument from me on that.

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus March 30, 2014 10:27 PM  

Hector: "I wonder if things would be different if he had donated to Prop 8 and Prop 8 didn't pass. Would everyone still be upset or is it that they lost at the ballot box that rankles them?"

Homosexual activists are committed to a "civil rights" social change model. That is, they follow the script of the American racial revolution, which is anti-white and met (and meets) with success. The civil rights model requires that opponents be dismissed as stupid, demeaned as irrational, demonized as the epitome of evil, criminalized and harassed.

"Homophobic" should become like "racist": it should make you socially unacceptable, unemployable, and subject to legal penalties. (For example, the official investigation into George Zimmerman's views on race was because if he had supported the wrong cause politically it would have had serious consequences for him legally.)

From the point of view of the civil rights model, it's irrelevant whether the Prop 8 law passed or not; the process of harassment, scolding and shaming, demonization and criminalization continues regardless.

Hitherto, Brendan Eich has been employable; he must be moved as far as possible to the "unemployable" end of the spectrum. Whether Proposition 8 passed is irrelevant, as is whether he apologizes, except as that may be useful in shaming him and defining him as stupid, irrational and evil by his own concessions.

This is a "permanent revolution" model: the process of making it "not OK to be a racist" or "not OK to be a homophobe" (or a "hater" or a "h8er") doesn't end, rather there are more demands.

It's also a collectivist model.

When people with a civil rights model fight people who don't understand it and are (perhaps unconsciously) committed to a model of social peace, where if I have offended you or harmed you, I should conciliate and make restitution to you and then social peace will resume, the dogmatic, demonizing collectivists put to flight the appeasement-minded individuals, and continually hound them to destruction.

Blogger James Dixon March 30, 2014 10:55 PM  

Speaking of a failure of leadership, guess who isn't in Fortune's 50 greatest world leaders?

Anonymous The CronoLink March 30, 2014 11:54 PM  

@dh

Figured as much (except the funding issues, of course); I'm pretty content with Firefox, it's still way better than other browsers, but with stuff like this it's always a good idea to have some options in sight; will check iceweasel and seamonkey, thank you

@James Dixon

Like Amok said, Opera sucks in PC, and I mostly use Chrome for facebook and google drive and stuff, since usually my college teammates use it for projects and communication. I like that Chrome is pretty fast and responsive but never liked it security options, though, it doesn't hurt to ask if anything has been done for chrome recently in that regard.

Anonymous Jack Amok March 31, 2014 2:00 AM  

By George, I believe he's got it. :)

Oh, I've had it for a few years. My biggest professional failure is I didn't convince the right folks at Microsoft of it in the early aughts. Possibly if the guy running the group hadn't been contemplating a sex change operation at the time...

Well, the world is truly a strange, strange place.

Anonymous Petronius March 31, 2014 7:11 AM  

This will not end well. We have already seen that the Eich are no match for the Gay Lensmen.

Petronius, speaking for Boskone.

Blogger James Dixon March 31, 2014 10:50 AM  

> Oh, I've had it for a few years.

Yeah, that's been fairly obvious in your comments.

Blogger James Dixon March 31, 2014 10:56 AM  

> Like Amok said, Opera sucks in PC...

Well, there is always Safari for the PC, but I haven't even looked at what it can do. If I have to pick an alternative, I'd probably go with Seamonkey. There are other, even less well known options. K-Meleon and Midori to name two.

Blogger Fred Ingram April 05, 2014 10:19 AM  

Is google chrome also developed by a gaggle of fudge packers ?

OpenID cailcorishev April 05, 2014 10:59 AM  

Is google chrome also developed by a gaggle of fudge packers ?

Probably no more or less than Firefox. Google is on board with enough other leftist causes that I doubt this would be an exception. But Google is also very useful to the people in charge, and it's still sort of "cool" in SWPL terms, so if a higher-up at Google once gave a donation to an anti-left cause, he's probably less likely to get publicly attacked for it. A quiet parting of the ways would be more likely.

But you never know.

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