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Thursday, July 17, 2014

Calcio is life

Every so often, David Brooks can be insightful. This sports analogy may help put things in perspective for people who often find themselves frustrated that life does not go the way they expect it to:
Most of us spend our days thinking we are playing baseball, but we are really playing soccer. We think we individually choose what career path to take, whom to socialize with, what views to hold. But, in fact, those decisions are shaped by the networks of people around us more than we dare recognize....

Once we acknowledge that, in life, we are playing soccer, not baseball, a few things become clear. First, awareness of the landscape of reality is the highest form of wisdom. It’s not raw computational power that matters most; it’s having a sensitive attunement to the widest environment, feeling where the flow of events is going. Genius is in practice perceiving more than the conscious reasoning.

Second, predictive models will be less useful. Baseball is wonderful for sabermetricians. In each at bat there is a limited range of possible outcomes. Activities like soccer are not as easily renderable statistically, because the relevant spatial structures are harder to quantify.
Everyone knows connections and networks and friends and family are more important to success than raw ability and hard work. And yet, that recognition offends most of us. It seems unfair somehow. But why? We see examples in every aspect of human endeavor. Even Michael Jordan didn't become a champion by scoring 63 points a game, he achieved more when he scored 30 and relied on Scottie Pippen and his other teammates to help him win the game.

The coach of my Nike team once asked me how it was that I scored a goal in every game that season, regardless of whether the team we played against was good or bad, whereas my more talented strike partner would tend to score three goals against the bad teams and get regularly shut out by the good ones. I pointed out that the other striker's goals were almost always brilliant individual efforts that involved beating two or three defenders on the dribble. Mine were almost always one- or two-touch shots that relied upon getting a well-placed pass from a midfielder, often my younger brother.

And while the other striker was a gifted player from Ireland who could dribble right past two or three lesser defenders, he wasn't gifted enough to beat two or three good ones in succession. For me, on the other hand, it made little difference if the defenders were good or bad, because as long as the midfielder passed the ball into the open space past the last defender, I was going to run right past them. When the defense was tough, a little teamwork reliably trumped considerably superior individual talent.

The lesson of soccer is that individual effort will often suffice when things are relatively easy. But in order to surmount the more difficult challenges, you will almost always need reliable teammates of one sort or another.

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61 Comments:

Anonymous Porphyry July 17, 2014 5:44 AM  

That doesn't mean there isn't a real time to recognize personal roles and act in them . Society was built on division of labor and individual courage. To look at life as merely tribal, is the most powerful decivilizing influence of all.

Anonymous Stilicho July 17, 2014 6:40 AM  

It's a tough lesson to learn. Especially for those who learned early to succeed on merit but didn't learn the limits of merit. Realizing it is a red pill moment.

Blogger JP July 17, 2014 6:42 AM  

The lesson of soccer is that individual effort will often suffice when things are relatively easy. But in order to surmount the more difficult challenges, you will almost always need reliable teammates of one sort or another.

Which is why a great wife is one of the best things a man can have in his life.

Blogger ScuzzaMan July 17, 2014 6:46 AM  

We cannot distinguish ourselves by following the crowd, and we cannot live alone.

Finding the balance between these two extremes is a big part of wisdom; Mr Brooks got that part right.

"For narrow is the way, and strait is the gate, that leads unto life, and few there be that find it."

--Some Guy on the Internet

Anonymous starr July 17, 2014 7:05 AM  

An elegant analogy. Maybe that is the reason soccer is the most popular sport in the world.

Anonymous Ridip July 17, 2014 7:10 AM  

After a really lousy night's sleep and waking up feeling like the things that matter most are beyond my control. I sit down to read the Bible and take a brief detour by Vox's and this is what I read.

As a light from heaven the words flow from the screen into my place of need. So often I act as though success in life depends upon my own exceptional effort, when the truth has always been that I am best as a team player. By God's grace may I find the right team.

Again, thank you Vox.

Anonymous Stephen J. July 17, 2014 7:51 AM  

Well said. The key is to recognize the importance of both cooperation and individual effort; at one extreme is "You didn't build that" and at the other is "Forget you, Jack, I got mine". The basic concept of "both/and" is hard to grasp for we binary-thinking "either/or" humans.

Anonymous Sigyn July 17, 2014 7:51 AM  

Everyone knows connections and networks and friends and family are more important to success than raw ability and hard work. And yet, that recognition offends most of us. It seems unfair somehow. But why?

We're taught that the most successful people are ruthless, cut-throat, and socially stunted. If one of them forms a "team", it's only to exploit the other members. The only "true" cooperation can be had through the government intervening and forcing people together who have nothing in common. And then you didn't build that; the government made it happen.

At least, that's the line I was fed. Can't speak for others, of course.

Blogger Titus Quinctius Cincinnatus July 17, 2014 8:01 AM  

But in order to surmount the more difficult challenges, you will almost always need reliable teammates of one sort or another.

Sounds vaguely...socialist...to me.

Anonymous VD July 17, 2014 8:03 AM  

To look at life as merely tribal, is the most powerful decivilizing influence of all.

Who said anything about tribalism? There is a vast difference between trying to succeed completely on your own and being a thoughtless member of a hive mind.

Anonymous MontyDraxel July 17, 2014 8:14 AM  

Sports metaphors are fun. I have a guilty pleasure enjoying Yogi Berra quotes.

"In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is."

"Baseball is ninety percent mental and the other half is physical."

https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/y/yogi_berra.html

Anonymous PhillipGeorge(c)2014 July 17, 2014 8:37 AM  

Good analogies.
Tribe, community, family, extended family, culture are all fuzzy words.
Muddied waters made worse in rudderless ships, the anchor-less vessels relativism sails in..
To the progressive, liberal, modernist, pseudo science, rationalist, multi cultics beauty and holiness aren't anything like rock solid. Their loss; but not without collateral damages paid community wide - it's hard to sore with eagles when surrounded by turkeys, Turkish, and suicide bombers screaming allah hu akbar.

Oh to hear those words plainly from Yodda's CGI lips "fucked in the head, they are"

Darwin, Muhammad, and Liberals. 2014. Everything else is just details.

Anonymous PhillipGeorge(c)2014 July 17, 2014 8:43 AM  

typos....soaring eagles are getting chewed in wind turbines

Blogger Guitar Man July 17, 2014 8:45 AM  

This is very good! And something that has taken me many years to finally understand. In career, in life, at church, etc.

Anonymous Stilicho July 17, 2014 8:46 AM  


Sounds vaguely...socialist...to me.


Teamwork and socialism are not the same thing by a long shot. Socialists try to sell socialism as teamwork and cooperation writ large in order to fool the proles. Teamwork is a matter of individuals working together to achieve a common goal. Socialism is a matter of suppressing individuality in order to achieve a collective result. Teamwork is a tool; a means of achieving an objective. Socialism is an objective.

Blogger Tom July 17, 2014 8:51 AM  

I'm reading a book on Eastern Orthodox Christianity, and I have to admit that they have some very impressive ideas and historical continuity to their faith. The reason I bring that up is because of this interesting distinction that is very important to Orthodox thought but is kind of missing or unappreciated in Western thought.

God made the world the way it is because that is how He wanted to make it. The world arises out of God's will and not His divine essence or some preexisting set of requirements.

The point here being that human life and our interactions with each other work the way God wants them to. God wants team work and reaching outside of ourselves to help us to succeed. God wants us to learn to love others and rely on others.

Ecc. 4:9-12 and Phil. 2:1-4 are both very strong endorsements from Scripture of this exact kind of thinking.

Thinking about Christ's life for a moment, do you realize that He just up and left 11 teammates to start the Church? He trained and prepared them and gave them the Holy Spirit though, so it isn't like He actually left them really.

Anonymous NorthernHamlet July 17, 2014 8:52 AM  

Vox,

To extend your metaphor: In the past few years, I've thought of you as a coach. In my time, I've always been surprised how many young men, even into their late 20s, don't have one. In a world without fathers, it can't be stressed enough how important it is to get one.

The great thing about the metaphor is that coaches need not be perfect, PC-following saints. As has often been the case in the great game, they can be hot-tempered, controversial, and even seem downright crazy at times. But the game is what matters.

For all my disagreeing, I have a lot of respect for you, especially when you do surprising things like remove a post at the request of an author or admit when you are wrong (not surprising for your personality, but for the way most people act). I've learned a lot about life hanging out here.

Your son/s are lucky to have you. And for what it's worth, one man to another: grazie mille.

Anonymous Thoughtful Reader July 17, 2014 8:53 AM  

you will almost always need reliable teammates of one sort or another.

Best argument for democratic socialism I have ever read.

Blogger WarKicker July 17, 2014 9:00 AM  

Vox,

I had a not too dissimilar experience in my brief stint playing soccer. As a sophomore in high school, my football coach suggested that I try out and play soccer to keep in shape and strengthen my leg (I was a kicker and punter). As one of the least skilled players,never having played soccer before, I was also easily the leading scorer all three seasons I played. My main attributes were speed and a strong leg. The other strikers were far more talented (one was an all-state selection in his junior and senior years), but also ball hogs. I just needed to be fed good passes from the midfielders.

Anonymous Rich July 17, 2014 9:00 AM  

"Sounds vaguely...socialist...to me."

Free association is now "socialist"?

Sounds vaguely like retarded Moldbuggian poo to me.

Blogger Joshua Dyal July 17, 2014 9:01 AM  

Best argument for democratic socialism I have ever read.

Successful teams are those who willingly band together for the achievement of an objective that is perceived to be bigger and more important than individual goals, or achievable for individuals.

That has little to nothing to do with socialism, which is legally enforced collectivism for the achievement of goals that few of the individuals care about except in the abstract, and which is easily exploited by those who use it merely to line their own nests and exploit the unwilling.

Blogger Joshua Dyal July 17, 2014 9:03 AM  

In fact, to add to that, I'd say that that's exactly the reason why it's not an argument for socialism. Because it's big and collective and bureaucratic and top-down, your "team mates" are, by definition, not reliable.

Which is exactly why every -ism that's loosely been based on Marxism has either limped along (democratic socialism) or failed miserably (communism, fascism) and inevitably must do so.

Blogger Nate July 17, 2014 9:04 AM  

Life isn't soccer. Life is football.

Anonymous FrankNorman July 17, 2014 9:04 AM  

The man who says "you didn't build that!" isn't offering to help you - he's wanting to steal from you. Socialists want you to contribute to the group, so that they can mooch off you.

But real group-cooperation is just the opposite.

Blogger Nate July 17, 2014 9:09 AM  

Man is by nature a social animal; an individual who is unsocial naturally and not accidentally is either beneath our notice or more than human. Society is something that precedes the individual. Anyone who either cannot lead the common life or is so self-sufficient as not to need to, and therefore does not partake of society, is either a beast or a god. - Aristotle

Anonymous FrankNorman July 17, 2014 9:10 AM  

Now speaking of sports metaphors, I recently watched the movie Invictus, which was supposed to be about Nelson Mandela, but ended up being about a Rugby game that Mandela was watching. Springboks vs All Blacks.

The New Zealand team had one very strong Maori player that no single member of the South African team was strong enough to tackle by himself. And so we get this lovely quote from Francois Pienaar, the Springbok team captain:

"Come boys. What the heck are we doing? Lomu is killing us. Forwards, we must start scrumming. We must disrupt them at the first phase. Can't allow Lomu to get the ball in space. He's freaking killing us. But listen, if Lomu gets the ball, whoever's there... James, Joost... hit the fucking guy, hold onto him, hold him. Help will come, help will be there. "

Anonymous Johnny Wong July 17, 2014 9:10 AM  

The NFL is America and America is the NFL.

Felons, thugs, West African domination, gays making out on the field, lectures at half time about the merits of gun control, Michael Sam, Penn State, OJ Simpson etc.

This is YOUR sport America. Embrace it.

Q: What do you say to a NFL player in a suit? A: Will the defendant please rise.

Anonymous RedJack July 17, 2014 9:11 AM  

Stilicho July 17, 2014 6:40 AM
It's a tough lesson to learn. Especially for those who learned early to succeed on merit but didn't learn the limits of merit. Realizing it is a red pill moment.



It was for me, and is still. I have reached the point in my life where I no longer care about it as much, but it does make me question how to raise my kids. I was taught to work hard, do your job, and you will be rewarded. The reality is you need to hobnob with those in power, and you will be rewarded.

Anonymous Daniel July 17, 2014 9:35 AM  

Socialism has nothing to do with cooperation and community. It is anti-community. It disrupts opportunity for individuals to form teams. It opposes success.

Soccer played with a socialist ethic would be all midfielders, no goals, and a ball made of stone. The score would be predetermined, and the winner would be a third team not on the field, comprised of the sons of government leadership.

Anonymous Cameron July 17, 2014 9:45 AM  

'The coach of my Nike team once asked me how it was that I scored a goal in every game that season...'

Nice we you to bring it back to you yank hoo, nice and subtle lol.

Anonymous Will Best July 17, 2014 9:46 AM  

We're taught that the most successful people are ruthless, cut-throat, and socially stunted. If one of them forms a "team", it's only to exploit the other members. The only "true" cooperation can be had through the government intervening and forcing people together who have nothing in common.

That is because the modern classic Bill Gates, and the new upstart Mark Zuckerberg both screwed over business partners, was do many of the visibly rich.

And speaking from experience it is often that owners don't realize the value of or are just flat out exploit key employees. It is sort of amusing to watch that employee finally grow a backbone and walk with 30-40% of the clients. Chinese companies seem particularly prone to this. I suspect its cultural. Owners are banking on risk aversion and submission to authority, but even while those cultural ties are still present in the US they tend to lessen.

Anonymous RedJack July 17, 2014 10:08 AM  

And speaking from experience it is often that owners don't realize the value of or are just flat out exploit key employees. It is sort of amusing to watch that employee finally grow a backbone and walk with 30-40% of the clients.

Those owners and managers are often the very first to accuse the people leaving of being traitors, theives, and immoral. They know what they are doing.

It is like the old saying that an Indian has no concept of private property (excusing them from stealing things like gas and what). The rejoinder is "If you believe that, steal from an Indian and see what happens".

Blogger Nate July 17, 2014 10:14 AM  

"The reality is you need to hobnob with those in power, and you will be rewarded."

There are limits to that side as well. If you have enough success on your own... those in power come calling to hobnob with you.

Blogger JaimeInTexas July 17, 2014 10:24 AM  

Two of my sons played indoor soccer. I told them I will give them $1 for every goal they made but $2 for every direct pass that scored a goal. Team playing relies in individual effort but not at the expense of the goal to be achieved ... to win.

Anonymous ThirdMonkey July 17, 2014 10:30 AM  

I spent about 5 years of my career as a one riot, one ranger type of guy. I was successful, but not nearly as successful as have been the last 5 years, as I have learned to offer up my talents to others and work on far bigger goals than I could have ever accomplished alone. Nobody likes a ball hog. A good hard pass to most any player who is in the right spot scores baskets and wins games.

Blogger Quadko July 17, 2014 10:47 AM  

Sounds vaguely...socialist...to me.
Gee, if that's all socialism was, who would object to that? And it wouldn't exist as a political movement, because nothing would distinguish it from either individual freedom of association or tribal concepts. But then socialists try to sneak in anti-free ideas like slavery through taxation, the community is more important than the individuals that make it up, and centralized command and control with themselves as most-equal-of-equals, and they wonder why people object...

Blogger Quadko July 17, 2014 10:48 AM  

"The reality is you need to hobnob with those in power, and you will be rewarded."
Or executed. One must walk carefully in the sight of the princes.

Anonymous Dr. Kenneth Noisewater July 17, 2014 10:48 AM  

The lesson of soccer is that individual effort will often suffice when things are relatively easy. But in order to surmount the more difficult challenges, you will almost always need reliable teammates of one sort or another.

However, teams can get too large and devolve into committees where nothing gets done, and individual ability gets Bergeron'd out. You can't hire 9 women to produce a child in 1 month, and adding manpower to a late software project makes it later.

Anonymous Pele July 17, 2014 11:08 AM  

"Life isn't soccer. Life is football."

Wrong.

Life is Futbol. Correct.

Anonymous pseudotsuga July 17, 2014 11:26 AM  

That last goal? You didn't make that...
>:-)

Anonymous Anonymous July 17, 2014 11:33 AM  

The main thing I take away from both the article and Vox's post is that having good social awareness of how others are reacting to the current environment can be a very good advantage when trying to maximize individual success, more so than just having great individual talent and trying to bull your way through alone all the time. Social skills and personal capability combined will outperform talent alone more often than not.

This is of personal interest to me in that I have two sons. The older is tall, bright, intelligent and good-looking but lacks real social awareness. The younger will always be shorter and tends to be a little chubby, but is a real social animal and always the leader in any group he enters. Girls 2-3 years older than him in grade school already paying him attention. He gets invited to all the birthday parties even if there only 2-3 kids coming and not all boys/whole class.

Go Down Fighting

Anonymous patrick kelly July 17, 2014 11:38 AM  

"If you have enough success on your own... those in power come calling to hobnob with you."

.....or steal from you....

OpenID bc64a9f8-765e-11e3-8683-000bcdcb2996 July 17, 2014 11:38 AM  

"...Genius is in practice perceiving more than the conscious reasoning."
Counterintuitive reasoning.
Successful navigation relies most, NOT in knowing where you are, but where you are NOT.
CaptDMO

Anonymous NorthernHamlet July 17, 2014 11:50 AM  

Life is Futbol.

Nate needs to check his spellchecker. First, "to" and now "football." What next, "double aught buck?"

Blogger The Anti-Gnostic July 17, 2014 12:05 PM  

It should also be noted, this is one of those David Brooks' columns which actually starts out, "Dear Steve Sailer, ..."

It's also got the usual deflection of Brooks puffing something up as the conventional wisdom, and then arguing against it so he can sound all iconoclastic and s***.

Anonymous NateM July 17, 2014 12:11 PM  

Speaking of Sabermetrics, Reading Moneyball, Billy Beane reminds me a great deal of VD. Throughout his character sees the traits and methods for success and follows them, even while old time baseball logic dictates that he's wrong. He meets success after success, showing his correct predictive model time and again, when people tell him it can't and won't work, or there isn't a demand for what he believes there is (sound familiar?0 And all along Billy Beane never did it with the self conscious 'i'm going to show them' attitude, it was always just a matter of doing what he knew he had to to win.

For those unfamiliar with the story, Beane himself was a major leaguer who was picked to go far based on the traditional "tools of the game' but wound up having a disappointing career, despite being unfamiliar with failure. He could have taken the gamma route and twisted logic to fit the interpretation that soothed his ego, but he didn't, instead using himself as the example of where that traditional baseball logic goes wrong. If anyone hasn't read it i'd recommend it highly, whether you are interested in baseball or statistics its a very interesting read (if you like neither it's probably not for you).

Blogger WarKicker July 17, 2014 12:26 PM  

"Life isn't soccer. Life is football."

Correct. And if my Gators don't show significant improvement this year, my life is about to get difficult.

Blogger Herb Nowell July 17, 2014 12:32 PM  

Everyone knows connections and networks and friends and family are more important to success than raw ability and hard work.

I disagree. I know too many people who think luck is all that matters and to the degree they recognize the value of connections, networks, friends, and family they consider each of those manifestations of luck. They never work to make connections or change their environment. Then again building connections, networks, and friendships is often itself a manifestation of work across the spectrum of difficulty.

I'll note I don't keep them in my circle of friends or my professional network.

Blogger ajw308 July 17, 2014 12:47 PM  

An elegant analogy. Maybe that is the reason soccer is the most popular sport in the world.
It's the same in hockey, just without the biting and pretending to be hurt.

Life isn't soccer. Life is football.
I once worked at a plant where the joke was "the production manager has a football analogy for everything" The truth of the matter was he did. No matter what point he had to make, there was a case in football that illustrated it and everyone was able to get it and see the parallels to their life and responsibilities at work.

Anonymous Peter Pan July 17, 2014 1:19 PM  

Two of my sons played indoor soccer. I told them I will give them $1 for every goal they made but $2 for every direct pass that scored a goal. Team playing relies in individual effort but not at the expense of the goal to be achieved ... to win.

Nice. I always valued my assist count more than my goal count, and I was always pretty high up the list for both (top five in goal scoring and assists in my team's entire history). If I got an assist, my team scored a goal. If I got a goal, my team still scored a goal. The ultimate result was literally the same, but my assists elevated the play of my teammates, and by extension, the play of the team. But when I did score, I celebrated the hell out of it. I wanted the fans to know that I was the one kicking butt out on the field.

The difference is, socialist soccer wouldn't allow for individual achievement, which means no individual would be allowed to celebrate, or be celebrated for, their own achievements. The saying, "There is no 'I' in 'Team,'" is a bunch of bull unless you're in the middle of a spelling exam. Some teammates are just better than others, and some of them are the reason your team keeps winning... or losing.

Anonymous CLK July 17, 2014 2:00 PM  

VD says "Everyone knows connections and networks and friends and family are more important to success than raw ability and hard work."

Who are you and what have you done with with VD ... :)... new rules for the blog that drive civility and now your adopting some basic liberal socialist values .. this is all very encouraging and more than a little interesting.. .. what could possibly be causing you to reevaluate what have been core VD philosophies ? This might be be hand of God reaching into your life ... next you will be joining the RCC...

Anonymous Porphyry July 17, 2014 2:40 PM  

"Who said anything about tribalism?" When one plays baseball, success is dictated by playing one's role as a member of the team, rather than focusing on the advantages of teamwork. When one plays soccer, the focus is on performing a specific goal with whatever rescourses one has at hand, the goal. Thinking of one's teamates as rescources to get towards the net, instead of individual actors is encouraged rather than discouraged.

"There is a vast difference between trying to succeed completely on your own and being a thoughtless member of a hive mind." As far as I can tell this distinction has nothing to do with what I was talking about, unless you meant to say that --- there is a vast difference between enlisting your friends and family to help you and being a thoughtless member of the hive mind.---- even so it still needs to be pointed out that, if one doesnt recognize one's place in society and pursue it wholeheartedly, one is acting out of some form or another of cowardice.

Blogger Herb Nowell July 17, 2014 2:45 PM  

If anyone hasn't read it i'd recommend it highly, whether you are interested in baseball or statistics its a very interesting read (if you like neither it's probably not for you).

I haven't read it (although the entire comment piqued my interest) but it sounds like it could appeal to a third category: those interested in learning what sets the successful apart.

Anonymous kh123 July 17, 2014 3:19 PM  

More often than not, one is saddled with unreliable teammates in areas larger than sports or work. Hence, some opt out of Team [insert company, community, country].

On the other hand, some stick with a losing cause for any number of reasons, loyalty or laziness*, or sometimes both. Not everyone can book one way tickets to another continent with alacrity.

*Can also be read as "flattened by life".

Anonymous Hillary Rodham Clinton July 17, 2014 5:22 PM  

See? I told you it takes a village...

Anonymous Michael of Charlotte July 17, 2014 5:23 PM  

Timely for me, for the second time in my life, who I know may be paying off unbelievably well. And yet, as someone who was raised on the idea that merit and hard work are all you need, it is somewhat disappointing. It does feel like I didn't earn it so I don't deserve it.

Course, if that's the greatest problem I face in life, my life will be pretty blessed.

Anonymous kh123 July 17, 2014 5:51 PM  

...Folks tend to resent nepotism probably for several reasons, one which tends to be (not that this is a universal) how conspicuous the lack of humility can be in certain instances where above-mentioned is in effect. It'd be like bragging about how one's own feet made it off the beaches at Normandy without a scratch because, hot damn, talent.

Blogger rycamor July 17, 2014 8:03 PM  

Nate July 17, 2014 10:14 AM

"The reality is you need to hobnob with those in power, and you will be rewarded."

There are limits to that side as well. If you have enough success on your own... those in power come calling to hobnob with you.


Indeed. One quite simple way to do that is to anticipate the need and be where the need will be. This is what I did, and it was a 10-year journey, building a skill that lots of fellow geeks sniffed at, but which is now in serious demand in the database world.

But the fact is you have to be able to hob-nob once they do come looking for you. Not that you need to be the life of whatever party they invite you to, but you have to be willing to step up and introduce yourself to people and talk about things they might happen to find interesting. This sort of thing of course comes easy to the Nates of the world, but not so much to some of the high-IQ introverts who habit these interblogs.

Me, I'm middling good at the hobnobbing, although trying to get better at it. It's a little difficult because I tend not to be interested by the things that interest the suits of the world. Oddly relevant an orthogonal way, having a current working knowledge of football and/or futbol is one way to cross that gap among men, (and one of my deficient areas. It's hard to make myself spend time looking at a game on the screen when I spend my day looking at one for work. I would much rather actually play than watch).

Anonymous Rabbit July 18, 2014 1:00 AM  

**Everyone knows connections and networks and friends and family are more important to success than raw ability and hard work. And yet, that recognition offends most of us. It seems unfair somehow.**

Because if you can't do the work, it means you're using your connections to get away with being a parasite off someone else's work.

Anonymous Beau July 18, 2014 1:01 AM  

Being new on the job here in SF I'm asking the staff individually, "What is the desire of your heart?" Each provided answer has been stirring. When they ask me what my job is the response is, "I'm here to take care of the care givers."

Blogger JaimeInTexas July 18, 2014 11:13 AM  

Why is [American] football still called football?

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