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Saturday, January 24, 2015

Rumblings of tech war

This article is amusingly incoherent concerning the growing fears of US technology companies concerning Europe:
One message so far from the corridors around the World Economic Forum in Davos: U.S. technology companies are very worried about the backlash they are now facing in Europe. From their standpoint, Europe risks shooting itself in the foot by rejecting the cutting-edge technologies they have brought to the continent. But they would say that, wouldn’t they? Look at it from the European point of view.

Europe once led the world in mobile technology: The Global System for Mobile Communications, developed in Europe, became the global standard. But that was a long time ago. Now, most innovation in information and communications technology comes in waves from across the Atlantic.

With America’s vibrant capital markets giving them billions of dollars in risk capital, they can absorb the successful European tech enterprises—look at Skype Technologies, swallowed by Microsoft Corp.

These U.S. companies— Google, Facebook , Amazon and others—are disrupting industry after industry. Publishing, telecoms and retailing have already been convulsed. Now, the companies, and Google in particular, are turning their gaze from consumer-oriented to business-oriented platforms.

That is a big deal for growth-starved Europe and for its biggest economy, Germany, which leads the world in high-quality engineering. Europe’s car industry is a leading employer, its suppliers reach through the continent, and it is one of the biggest spenders on research and development. Germany’s machine-tool manufacturers are deservedly renowned.

But much of the future profit for these industries won’t flow from punching metal but from the networks they will use to manage information—for example, taking the cars where they want to go, catering to passengers with entertainment and retail experiences as they travel—and it’s a strategic question who owns them.
Isn't it good of those US technology executives to worry so much about Europe shooting themselves in the foot? They must have tremendous empathy! Or could it be that they are not telling the truth and it is something else that worries them?

Such as, perhaps, the possibility that they will be legally locked out of Europe due to their enabling of US goverment espionage and their continued disinclination to show any respect for various European privacy laws?

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13 Comments:

Anonymous Quartermaster January 24, 2015 9:00 AM  

You know how it is. Whiners will whine.

I stay away from Google, and would rather commit seppaku with a putty knife then be on Facebook.

OpenID UnderwaterOperative January 24, 2015 9:08 AM  

They have nothing to worry about.... Obama Sees Need for Encryption Backdoor

Blogger Rantor January 24, 2015 9:09 AM  

Necessity is the mother of invention, and national/corporate security concerns in Europe could force continental companies to find new ways to work without CISCO routers or Microsoft bloatware.

Blogger Subversive Saint January 24, 2015 9:11 AM  

Stay away!! Don't worry Blogger isn't Google.

Anonymous grey enlightenment January 24, 2015 10:24 AM  

higher taxes, more regulation, worse demographics..no surprise Europe is lagging and will continue to to do so versus the USA.

Blogger Laguna Beach Fogey January 24, 2015 10:34 AM  

Isn't it good of those US technology executives to worry so much about Europe shooting themselves in the foot? They must have tremendous empathy!

I thought the same thing. How generous of them!

Anonymous RedJack January 24, 2015 10:37 AM  

There are a few things I have noticed. The disruption of whole industries (publishing for one) has sent shock waves through all of the economy. There is a lot of pressure from finance to stop or at least slow innovation. Simply put, they can't figure out if they should invest in say a publishing house if the whole business could go away in a few years.

The second thing is that the knowledge that American tech companies use their products to spy on their customers, sometimes for the US Fedgov, sometimes for others, has changed how companies operate. I mentioned before that my company is starting to move away from US based tech, and in some cases back to the old fashioned snail mail, in order to maintain secrecy. It is kind of nuts, we make a commodity, but if my company is doing it, what will others do?

Anonymous tiredofitall January 24, 2015 11:25 AM  

"They have nothing to worry about.... Obama Sees Need for Encryption Backdoor" - UnderwaterOperative

Not even remotely surprised Obama is desperate for some backdoor action. At least this way he doesn't have to fake golf trips so Michelle isn't suspicious of him being "on the downlow".

Anonymous Will Best January 24, 2015 12:33 PM  

I hope they do. It would be nice if Europe could develop some tech that is free from the spying eyes of Uncle Sam that us ordinary Americans could use.

Then again, if I were the average European I could give a toss what the US knew about me so long as they didn't share that with my government.

Anonymous takin' a look January 24, 2015 3:00 PM  

Last paragraph sums it up Vox.

-Redjack

Even snail mail isn't safe, you'd have to use a bunch of different addresses/PO boxes to throw industrial/commercial espionage off the trail. Forget formulas and plans on anything with a net connection. Hell, who knows WTF has been encrypted on all our tech?

Imagine you've build the better mousetrap, only to get arrested for hardcore child pornography on your hard drive . One year later, while you are praying the tests come back negative as you sit on your very sore ass; you see your mousetrap on the television. You look it up online and see it's owned by a Moishe Hymenburg from Tel Aviv. Small world right ?

Blogger James Dixon January 24, 2015 6:16 PM  

> Such as, perhaps, the possibility that they will be legally locked out of Europe due to their enabling of US goverment espionage and their continued disinclination to show any respect for various European privacy laws?

Well, it honestly couldn't happen to a more deserving bunch of companies.

Anonymous Steve January 25, 2015 6:43 PM  

Our government deserves the distrust and even detestation of Europeans. Every ounce of it. The United States has treated our natural allies like dirt,when together, we could have worked out a global migration control system to keep muslim jihadis,benefits-scamming 3rd worlders,subversives.and ebola-ridden Africans out of our countries while watching each other's backs and protecting each other from crazy nuclear-equipped dictators from about three corners of the world.

I would still like to see something like that one day. Not an economic Union,nor any political pact to fight against other Europeans, but a voluntary information and agent-sharing program to protect us against threats like dar -Al Islam and to contain disease outbreaks or invader surges at the borders.

But there's no reason why the Europeans should trust any American administration,spouting this "liberal democracy" nonsense.

If they don't support nationalism and if they don't expose the people behind immigration and financial catastrophes, then don't trust them.

One day,European brothers and sisters, I hope America will have the privilege of proposing a peaceful voluntary confederation with you to protect all of our borders from invaders, all of our children from subversive anti-Western Cultural Marxism,and all of our people from the deadly disease festering on the outskirts of our glorious civilization. I hope by that time we are able to trust each other enough to voluntarily assist one another in this manner.

There's a lot of reasons to mistrust America right now, but I know that in the future there will be grounds for a common friendship which I believe will enable us to achieve our noble destiny together.

Until then,hail Europa!

Blogger JCclimber January 26, 2015 2:28 PM  

regarding Obama and his golf game, I've golfed a few times, so I'm not expert by any means. So I'm asking if anyone who knows the game can answer this question:
Is it unreasonable to expect that if you play 60+ games per year, that your handicap would be expected to improve year over year?

Is Obama really golfing?

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