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Friday, February 27, 2015

He lived long and prospered

Leonard Nimoy, Spock of ‘Star Trek,’ Dies at 83. Death comes for us all in time. Even half-Vulcans.
Leonard Nimoy, the sonorous, gaunt-faced actor who won a worshipful global following as Mr. Spock, the resolutely logical human-alien first officer of the Starship Enterprise in the television and movie juggernaut “Star Trek,” died on Friday morning at his home in the Bel Air section of Los Angeles. He was 83.

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122 Comments:

Anonymous Heh February 27, 2015 12:49 PM  

Let's all watch him sing the Bilbo song for old time's sake!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGF5ROpjRAU

Anonymous Steve February 27, 2015 12:50 PM  

Rest in peace, Leonard.

Blogger James Dixon February 27, 2015 12:51 PM  

He will be missed.

Anonymous fish February 27, 2015 12:51 PM  

Let the cheesy Star Trek death lines commence!

....Of all the souls I have encountered in my travels, his was the most human

Godspeed Mr. Spock!

Blogger jaericho February 27, 2015 12:52 PM  

Godspeed, Mr. Nimoy.

Blogger Shadowdancer Duskstar February 27, 2015 12:52 PM  

One of my favorite actors... ;_; RIP

Anonymous Daniel February 27, 2015 12:52 PM  

Loved his character on the original show, his character arc in the movies (even though I didn't actually like the stories post Khan) and his hosting of In Search of... also his tweets. Salute and RIP.

Anonymous Daniel February 27, 2015 12:54 PM  

He also was the best part by far of the Sutherland version of Body Snatchers.

Anonymous Leonidas February 27, 2015 12:56 PM  

\\//

Anonymous The OASF February 27, 2015 12:57 PM  

The voice of "Galvatron" in the Transformers hand-drawn animation film circa 1986 has died. What was that other gig he had, Star something?

RIP good sir.

Blogger YIH February 27, 2015 1:00 PM  

Wikipedia just added it. They were right on top of it when Robin Williams died (it came up when I googled robin williams died).
They've even been known to 'jump the gun' sometimes

Blogger Beefy Levinson February 27, 2015 1:03 PM  

Now would be a good time for a colorful metaphor.

Blogger Mr.MantraMan February 27, 2015 1:12 PM  

He was also in a TV movie version of "Brave New World" which is worth checking out

Anonymous Stephen J. February 27, 2015 1:12 PM  

The living icon of hope for all those whose brains outraced their social skills, like me, and a damn fine actor besides. God speed, sir, god speed.

Blogger YIH February 27, 2015 1:14 PM  

Daniel:
his hosting of In Search of...
That was a good show - whether you believed any of that stuff or not. And of course, Nimoy was perfect as host/narrator for it.

Blogger Krul February 27, 2015 1:15 PM  

I'll always remember him as the brilliant, homicidal heart surgeon from my favorite episode of Columbo.

The needs of the many... outweigh...

Anonymous Toddy Cat February 27, 2015 1:16 PM  

Nimoy was always very open about his faith in God, and that alone would have made him unusual in Hollywood. May God's eternal light shine upon him.

Blogger YIH February 27, 2015 1:23 PM  

Like Fatner, his singing career was only good in the so bad, it's good sort of way.

Anonymous meh February 27, 2015 1:24 PM  

Hello. I'm Leonard Nimoy. The following tale of alien encounters is true. And by true, I mean false. It's all lies. But they're entertaining lies. And in the end, isn't that the real truth? The answer is: No.

Blogger Bob Wallace February 27, 2015 1:25 PM  

At least he never sang "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" like that loon Shatner.

Anonymous Heh February 27, 2015 1:32 PM  

Nimoy was always very open about his faith in God, and that alone would have made him unusual in Hollywood.

Maybe he got a pass because he was Jewish, which was (and is)... not so unusual in Hollywood.

Kirk, Spock, and Chekhov -- they shoulda called that show "Jews In Space".

Anonymous cheddarman February 27, 2015 1:34 PM  

I always liked the Kirk, Spock McCoy adventures in the original series and first Star Trek movies. When i was a kid, Spock was kind of a hero for us science nerds.



Blogger JartStar February 27, 2015 1:34 PM  

This comment has been removed by the author.

Blogger JartStar February 27, 2015 1:36 PM  

He was the narrator for Civ IV, and did a great job. Civilization IV: "In The Beginning" - YouTube

Anonymous Donn February 27, 2015 1:38 PM  

He never got to play Gandalf, now he never will.

Blogger Cataline Sergius February 27, 2015 1:39 PM  

No one can believe it today but Spock was quite the sex symbol for a while. I don't think Nimoy had ever planned on that career track.

Blogger YIH February 27, 2015 1:41 PM  

In his younger days he also did a western or two. After Star Trek of course, he wasn't able to get those gigs anymore.
At least he didn't have to do margarine commercials to pay the rent ;)

Blogger Laguna Beach Fogey February 27, 2015 1:42 PM  

Fond memories of him from 'In Search Of...'. RIP

Blogger Quadko February 27, 2015 1:48 PM  

I very much enjoyed whenever he showed up in non-StarTrek roles, and I certainly loved Spock. Fringe, Brave New World, - heh, that Bangles video as the irritated chauffeur father figure! It was always a pleasure to hear his voice or see him in something. The old parts in westerns is a blast to see pics and clips of now.

(I swore he was a jinn or evil wizard in farie tale theater or something, but I don't see the listing. That was my first childhood "whoah! Actors aren't just roles", realization. "How can Spock be a bad guy!"

His IMDB page:
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000559/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1

Blogger Cataline Sergius February 27, 2015 1:49 PM  

Nimoy's last tweet:

"A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP"

Blogger maniacprovost February 27, 2015 1:50 PM  

Star Trek has had a lot of fine actors to carry the shaky writing. Spock pulled it off.

Anonymous Ostar February 27, 2015 1:53 PM  

I can't believe no has yet said "He lived long but can no longer prosper".

But seriously - Nimoy made Star Trek, not Shatner.

And his voiceover for Sputnik in CIV 4: "beep, beep, beep" - he could make even the silly interesting.

Blogger Nate February 27, 2015 1:55 PM  

I hope folks remember that Nimoy did a lot more in his life than wear pointy ears and play pretend on TV.

Blogger Krul February 27, 2015 1:57 PM  

I just remembered. Leonard starred in the music video for 'The Lazy Song'.

An oddly entertaining video, despite the music.

Anonymous paradox February 27, 2015 2:04 PM  

I really wanted JJ Abrams to give Nimoy a surprise role in The Force Awakens. The ST fanboys would've had a collective heart attack.

Blogger MATT February 27, 2015 2:05 PM  

This is pretty sad.

Anonymous fish February 27, 2015 2:07 PM  

In his younger days he also did a western or two. After Star Trek of course, he wasn't able to get those gigs anymore.

He also had a bit part in "Them". A movie that stands the test of time as the greatest giant bug epic of all!

Anonymous Stg58 / Animal Mother February 27, 2015 2:08 PM  

That would have been funny swing Nimoy pop up in SW. Maybe Abrams can do a blue outline shout out.

Anonymous Steve February 27, 2015 2:14 PM  

"At least he didn't have to do margarine commercials"

No, but he was quite the dapper pitchman for Magnavox Laserdisc.

Best part is near the start. A glowing space-rock starts making high-pitched squeaking noises. Nimoy says: "Yes, I can understand you... I'm Leonard Nimoy"

Anonymous Peter Pan February 27, 2015 2:14 PM  

I'm just disappointed that he'll never wear his white and gold uniform again.

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus February 27, 2015 2:15 PM  

He was a good, strong actor.

Anonymous DNW February 27, 2015 2:16 PM  


"The old parts in westerns is a blast to see pics and clips of now.

(I swore he was a jinn or evil wizard in farie tale theater or something, but I don't see the listing. That was my first childhood "whoah! Actors aren't just roles", realization. "How can Spock be a bad guy!""



I'll do this without checking it: But I believe that is Nimoy in a bit role in the old ealry1950's Sci-Fi flick "Them"; wherein he plays the role of a skeptical young desk soldier relaying a report off the teletype of someone sighting flying, ant-like UFOs. Makes some wisecrack about Texas.


Though not a tremendous fan of science fiction, I must admit that as a 10 year old or whatever, I was panting with anticipation as the time for the network presentation of the original Star Trek rolled around.

Blogger YIH February 27, 2015 2:19 PM  

manicprovost:
Star Trek has had a lot of fine actors to carry the shaky writing. Spock pulled it off.
The writing wasn't that bad it worked as Roddenberry said ''wagon train to the stars'' (a repurposed western) but Star Trek: the motion picture the writing (and even worse, the editing) did fail there.

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus February 27, 2015 2:20 PM  

Nate: "I hope folks remember that Nimoy did a lot more in his life than wear pointy ears and play pretend on TV."

Ricardo Montalban would have made himself unforgettable even if he had never had a role other than Khan Noonien Singh. An actor of real quality only needs one chance: the right one. The rest is gravy.

Blogger Silent Cal February 27, 2015 2:22 PM  

So Sad.

Blogger YIH February 27, 2015 2:24 PM  

fish:
He also had a bit part in "Them". A movie that stands the test of time as the greatest giant bug epic of all!
Nimoy despised his typecasting - unlike DeForsest Kelly (Dr. McCoy).
Even in Night of the lepus (a film I'm disappointed MST3k never got around to do) he was some form of Doctor.

Anonymous Leonidas February 27, 2015 2:28 PM  

Star Trek has had a lot of fine actors to carry the shaky writing.

The thing about Star Trek is that it was, to a large degree, a slate. Not so much blank as lightly sketched out. The setup provided quite a bit of flexibility to tell stories in, which was good. The upside is that the quality has a lot to do with the quality of the given author. The downside is that the quality has a lot to do with the the quality of the given author.

There is some very good stuff (episodes, movies, novels, you name it) set in the Trek universe. There's also an awful lot of absolute crap. When it was good it was really good. When it was bad it absolutely earned every single mockery and parody it ever received.

As for the actors, they've always been hit and miss. Nimoy was good, and there were some real greats as part of the series over time. But there's a reason Shatner and Wheaton and others were and are so ridiculed, and it wasn't (just) the shaky writing.

Anonymous tdm February 27, 2015 2:28 PM  

Paris,Mission Impossible 1969

Anonymous Heh February 27, 2015 2:31 PM  

Ricardo Montalban would have made himself unforgettable even if he had never had a role other than Khan Noonien Singh.

Yes, I'll never forget those "genuine corinthian leather" ads.

Blogger YIH February 27, 2015 2:31 PM  

Steve:
No, but he was quite the dapper pitchman for Magnavox Laserdisc.
Boy was that dated-looking! The Laserdisc (and discs) player itself was actually better than the content on it.
Kinda like listening to a highly compressed MP3 of a 78rpm record.

Blogger jaericho February 27, 2015 2:33 PM  

Rifftrax did Night of the Lepus.

Blogger wrf3 February 27, 2015 2:35 PM  

Say "hi" to Gracie.

Anonymous kfg February 27, 2015 2:44 PM  

So long, and thanks for all the tribbles.

Blogger YIH February 27, 2015 2:44 PM  

Leonidas:
But there's a reason Shatner and Wheaton and others were and are so ridiculed, and it wasn't (just) the shaky writing.
Click this and see whose face shows up more than anyone else's

Anonymous daddynichol February 27, 2015 2:45 PM  

Another hero from my childhood is gone. RIP Mr. Nimoy.

Blogger Mekadave February 27, 2015 2:52 PM  

RIP Mr Nimoy. So many memories of Star Trek when I was a kid.

Also, his Audi commercial with Quinto was downright hilarious. Watch for him singing a hobbity tune.

http://youtu.be/WPkByAkAdZs

Blogger YIH February 27, 2015 2:58 PM  

Sometimes Whackopedia absolutely nails it!
OTOH, is it just me or does Wheaton look like he just did a huge bong hit before each and every photo here.
And still does. Maybe that's why he can stand hanging around JOHN SCALZI...
'Cause he's stoned!

Blogger YIH February 27, 2015 3:04 PM  

mekadave:
RIP Mr Nimoy. So many memories of Star Trek when I was a kid.

Also, his Audi commercial with Quinto was downright hilarious. Watch for him singing a hobbity tune.

That was like watching DeForest Kelley on TNG, and for much the same reason.

OpenID malcolmthecynic February 27, 2015 3:11 PM  

Leonidas,

There is some very good stuff (episodes, movies, novels, you name it) set in the Trek universe. There's also an awful lot of absolute crap. When it was good it was really good. When it was bad it absolutely earned every single mockery and parody it ever received.

Nailed it. Loved "Wrath of Khan", though. Even Shatner did a great job in that one.

Anonymous sawtooth February 27, 2015 3:22 PM  

Spock; on those rare occasions when he did display emotion such as passion or rage he was pure badass.
Even the normally alpha Kirk would wilt (well, maybe not entirely).

Nimoy turned the Spock character into one of the most well known and beloved characters in TV history.
God rest his soul.


Blogger YIH February 27, 2015 3:27 PM  

sawtooth:
Spock; on those rare occasions when he did display emotion such as passion or rage he was pure badass.
Even the normally alpha Kirk would wilt (well, maybe not entirely).

How much do you want to bet he really did kick Fatner's ass in those scenes?

Anonymous zen0 February 27, 2015 3:44 PM  

The character of Spock would be resurrected for several feature films after "Star Trek" snowballed into a cultural phenomenon in the 70s and 80s, making Spock's Vulcan salute and salutation "live long and prosper" -- a touchstone of the science-fiction world.

Nimoy would later reveal he based the hand gesture on his childhood memories of the way the kohanim would hold their hand when giving the priestly blessings..

Anonymous Stickwick February 27, 2015 3:53 PM  

Nimoy's last tweet: "A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP"

A good part of what makes his passing so momentous and so sad is the growing sense that something special is permanently leaving this world. I don't wish to blow this out of proportion, but every time some iconic person or institution comes to an end, it evokes a feeling similar to what a lot of people get at the end of The Lord of the Rings. You realize that the things that made Middle-earth special and magical, the elements that gave that world greatness, depth, and color, are departing forever. I dunno if it's just me, but it seems like our world is getting smaller, flatter, and more colorless all the time.

Nate: I hope folks remember that Nimoy did a lot more in his life than wear pointy ears and play pretend on TV.

I had the great privilege of seeing him speak at the University of Texas back in 2002. He came to talk about his Shekhina photographic art, which was quite good, and very spiritual. He talked about his Jewish faith, and seemed almost as intellectual as the character for whom he was best known. Most people, of course, came to the event to see Spock. Even though you could tell he really just wanted to talk about his photographs, he was very gracious and patient with all of the Spock questions from the audience. The man was all class.

Anonymous Musashi February 27, 2015 3:54 PM  

"He's dead, Jim."

Blogger Rabbi B February 27, 2015 3:58 PM  

" . . . they shoulda called that show "Jews In Space"."

A little trivia . . .

Spock's famous Vulcan salute was something he remembered from the synagogue as a kid. It is supposed to represent the Hebrew letter "Shin" and is used when pronouncing the Birchat ha Kohanim (Priestly Blessing) . . . "May the L-rd bless you and keep you, may He make His face to shine upon you . . etc."

"Live long and prosper" must be the abridged Vulcan version.

Anonymous Feh February 27, 2015 4:13 PM  

every time some iconic person or institution comes to an end, it evokes a feeling similar to what a lot of people get at the end of The Lord of the Rings.

Except I feel like I'm in the alternate LOTR where Sauron wins and the Orcs take over.

Anonymous Stickwick February 27, 2015 4:27 PM  

Feh: Except I feel like I'm in the alternate LOTR where Sauron wins and the Orcs take over.

I know what you mean, and I feel like that, too, sometimes. But it's temporary and it just highlights the futility of placing our hopes in this world instead of the world to come. Even though we know how the story will ultimately end -- with victory -- it hardly makes the departure of key characters any less sorrowful.

Anonymous Toddy Cat February 27, 2015 4:34 PM  

"Maybe he got a pass because he was Jewish, which was (and is)... not so unusual in Hollywood"

Very true, but most Hollywood Jews treat their Judaism as an ethnicity, not a religion. If you're gonna have Jews in Hollywood, I prefer mine religious, like Nimoy...

Blogger Cataline Sergius February 27, 2015 4:40 PM  

Shatner is Jewish too. Not that anyone remembers, nor does he remind anyone.

Anonymous pntz7 February 27, 2015 4:41 PM  

Nimoy was a central figure in the rise of american christian cultural destruction

The salute, which Nimoy devised himself, was taken from a Jewish prayer. The split-finger gesture represents the Hebrew letter shin.
In the video below, Nimoy digs deeper into the salute’s Jewish origins.

http://www.jta.org/2015/02/27/default/the-jewish-origins-of-spocks-salute


Blogger Cataline Sergius February 27, 2015 4:42 PM  

Spock was one of us

A little too smart for his own good. A little off putting when you first met him. He was a bit distant by choice but was very lonely for it all the same. He never quite got the social conventions, that came so naturally to his friends. He had to prod himself when proper niceties were required because he never quite understood them. His friends teased him quite a bit because of this.

But by God they were utterly helpless without him. If it wasn't for Spock they would have had a one way ticket to The Land of I'm Fucked before the first month of the Five Year Mission was over with. Things never went well for anybody at all, when Spock kicked back and had laugh. Or worse whenever he lost it and started swearing.


Everyone needed Spock to be exactly who he was.

The first power nerd.

Blogger Daniel February 27, 2015 4:50 PM  

Shekinha makes the men "foolish" enough to seek it strange and alien on this world. Hallelujah.

Blogger wrf3 February 27, 2015 4:59 PM  

pntz7 wrote: Nimoy was a central figure in the rise of american christian cultural destruction

Utter nonsense. Christians have only themselves to blame.

Anonymous Harsh February 27, 2015 5:17 PM  

Nimoy was a central figure in the rise of american christian cultural destruction

Oh, good lord.

Anonymous Harsh February 27, 2015 5:22 PM  

But seriously - Nimoy made Star Trek, not Shatner.

Nah, Star Trek was nothing without both of them. And Kelley. It was the dynamic between the characters (and actors) that made the series what it was.

Anonymous DavidKathome February 27, 2015 5:24 PM  

God bless Mr. Nimoy.

Blogger Rabbi B February 27, 2015 5:28 PM  

"Nimoy was a central figure in the rise of american christian cultural destruction"

Now, THAT'S funny . . .

Anonymous Samuel Scott February 27, 2015 5:40 PM  

Nimoy was a central figure in the rise of american christian cultural destruction

Show us on the doll where the Jews touched you.

As far as people feeling sad that icons are passing away and that everything is getting worse -- I think it's just because we're getting older and every generation has felt that way before its time is up.

I bet senior citizens thought "Star Trek" was crap in the 1960s and thought the Golden Age of Hollywood in the 1930s was the pinnacle of culture. Just like I can't stand Miley Cyrus and think the best era of music was roughly the late 1960s to the early 1990s.

People tend to think that whatever mass culture was popular when they went through puberty is the best ever.

Same as it ever was.

Blogger Admiral James February 27, 2015 5:45 PM  

I thought Shatner was an atheist?

Anonymous Claymore February 27, 2015 5:47 PM  

Dr. McCoy said it best. "I'm trying to thank you, you pointed-eared hobgoblin!"

Anonymous Stickwick February 27, 2015 5:51 PM  

Harsh: Nah, Star Trek was nothing without both of them. And Kelley. It was the dynamic between the characters (and actors) that made the series what it was.

Absolutely. My daughter and I have been watching all of the TOS episodes in order for the last couple of months, and you start to see that powerful dynamic between the three of them by the second season. By the third season, the dynamic is so strong and so compelling that it carries them through some really weak episodes ("Spock's Brain," argh). You realize at some point that the original Star Trek isn't really about the United Federation of Planets or any of the hippy-dippy stuff Roddenberry envisioned, but about Kirk-Spock-McCoy. (FWIW, I discussed this at length in my review of the then-new Star Trek reboot.)

Anonymous karsten February 27, 2015 5:55 PM  

I'm not taking a position for or against pntz7's comment, except to remind everyone of the obvious fact that:

1) Nimoy was not Spock. We're talking about the death of an actor, not of Spock.
2) The real Nimoy was indeed a standard Hollywood Leftist in his politics. And a Jew (but I repeat myself).

I might also point out that every time Samuel Scott chimes in, it's to defend the Tribe from one criticism or another.

And that "where did the Jew touch you" disqualifying joke wasn't funny the first few times it's been deployed on this forum. Now it has become stale in addition to lacking wit in the first place.

Anonymous Samuel Scott February 27, 2015 5:59 PM  

I might also point out that every time Samuel Scott chimes in, it's to defend the Tribe from one criticism or another.

Vox's blog is on the list of sites that the Elders gave me to monitor a few years ago.

Anonymous Stickwick February 27, 2015 6:00 PM  

Samuel Scott: I bet senior citizens thought "Star Trek" was crap in the 1960s and thought the Golden Age of Hollywood in the 1930s was the pinnacle of culture. Just like I can't stand Miley Cyrus and think the best era of music was roughly the late 1960s to the early 1990s.

I understand the point you're making -- we do tend to mythologize the past into some Golden Age -- but at the same time, you've underscored mine. My grandparents' generation got Star Trek to whine about. My generation got Miley Cyrus.

Anonymous JI February 27, 2015 6:01 PM  

Stickwick. My daughter and I also went through the entire set of TOS a few years ago and it seems like she's more culturally aware than her peers because of it. For example, we live near an Army base and encountered some young soldiers and their wives who were from a, shall we say, non-elite unit, while out at the grocery store. So my daughter, 10 years old at the time, asked, Daddy, are they the Army's redshirts? Wow, out of the mouth of babes! Completely agree with you that the series was about Kirk-Spock-McCoy.

Blogger Daniel February 27, 2015 6:06 PM  

Shatner's faith by era:

1960s: " Emotionally I would like to believe there is a life after death. Intellectually I cannot accept the idea. . .as for myself, I have finally come to the conclusion that life is here and now . . . and nothing more."

In semi-retirement: ""My belief system is that when this is over, it's over. That you don't look down from heaven and wait for your loved ones to join you. There may be some soul activity, but I'm not sure about that. "

Now, near death: "I'm so not ready to die. It petrifies me. I go alone. I go to a place I don't know. It might be painful. It might be the end. My thought is that it is the end. I become nameless, and I spent a lifetime being known."

Bill Shatner, definitely not an atheist.

Blogger Nate February 27, 2015 6:06 PM  

"Nimoy was a central figure in the rise of american christian cultural destruction"

Shut up you blithering idiot. This is not the time for your autistic ejectus.

Anonymous Samuel Scott February 27, 2015 6:09 PM  

Sometimes I think Sheldon Cooper is a mix of Spock and Niles Crane. Is it just me?

Actually, my first exposure to Star Trek was TNG in the 1980s. Only later did I see some of TOS and then most of the TOS movies as a teenager. I think one of my first crushes was Counselor Troi. But as much as I loved Picard, I think he and his senior crew had less of the comraderie and that je ne sais quoi that Kirk-Spock-McCoy had.

Blogger Daniel February 27, 2015 6:26 PM  

Stickwick, I would have posted this at your place if you weren't so McRapey with the banhammer:

The elegant psuedoscientific trinity of Spock-Bones-Kirk is completely lost in the deboot version. What's even more shocking is when you consider that these actors are supposed to portray the younger versions...but Chris Pine (in the second deboot) was the same age as Shatner was when he started Star Trek.

Actually most of the "new" "younger" actors are comparably aged to their counterparts of the early tv show, and yet the originals accomplish lightness and gravitas more effectively than their refreshers do.

OpenID cailcorishev February 27, 2015 6:29 PM  

Nimoy was a central figure in the rise of american christian cultural destruction

Ladies and gentlemen, your early frontrunner for Mr. Tonedeaf 2015.

Anonymous Steve February 27, 2015 6:37 PM  

Stickwick - You realize at some point that the original Star Trek isn't really about the United Federation of Planets or any of the hippy-dippy stuff Roddenberry envisioned

The Federation would be insufferable. Firefly nailed why that would be. Prissy, officious, and intolerant. It'd be the European Union in space.

Star Trek was at its best when it boldly strayed the farthest from Roddenberry's bland techno-utopianism. DS9 is the greatest series precisely because its characters were flawed and thus believable people dealing with difficult situations in which there isn't always a clear delineation between right and wrong.

Of the original cast, the sheer charisma of the actors tended to elevate Star Trek above other science fiction shows. They might not have been great actors, or even necessarily good ones, but Kirk, Spock, McCoy and Scotty were memorable and fun to watch. And it's the actors who brought them to life. They were perfectly cast. If, say, Martin Landau had played Spock, and Jack Lord was Kirk, I don't think the show would have had the same lasting appeal.

By the time the movies came around, it felt like we were watching a group of old friends.

Other 60's science fiction shows have largely faded from popular memory, and their lack of compelling characters has a lot to do with that. Lost In Space only had Dr. Smith and Robby the Robot. I can't remember any of the characters from The Time Tunnel or Land Of The Giants.

Anonymous Stickwick February 27, 2015 6:44 PM  

Daniel: Stickwick, I would have posted this at your place if you weren't so McRapey with the banhammer:

Aughghgh... I've been compared with Scalzi -- my life is over. (I turned the comments off, since the blog is effectively in a coma at the moment. When I reboot the blog later this year, my approach to comments will be more or less Voxian.)

Actually most of the "new" "younger" actors are comparably aged to their counterparts of the early tv show, and yet the originals accomplish lightness and gravitas more effectively than their refreshers do.

You said it, bro. A lot of it had to do with the life experiences of the actors prior to joining the show. Neither Nimoy nor Shatner had it easy growing up Jewish in Catholic neighborhoods and during WWII. Kelley, of course, was older and more experienced, as was Doohan, who had been to war -- guy got shot six times at Normandy on D-Day (he lost a finger, and was pretty good at concealing it in his acting). That lightness and gravitas comes from within. This new generation of actors? I'm not sure what it is they have to draw upon.

Anonymous A Visitor February 27, 2015 6:48 PM  

Never watched Stark Trek but knew of him being Spock. The few cameos he did in Fringe were great, especially the thought bubble. RIP.

Anonymous zen0 February 27, 2015 6:57 PM  

> I think one of my first crushes was Counselor Troi.

Lt. Nyota Uhura was hot.

Of course, at the age at which I was watching, anything female was hot.

Blogger rcocean February 27, 2015 6:58 PM  

TOS was well cast and well written. Nimoy and Shatner and De Forest Kelly were great in their roles. None of them were any great shakes as actors. One thing that does bother me about TOS is the phony half-hearted diversity. Spock is *half* human. The people of color are all supporting characters and the only two women (Nurse Chapel and Uhura) are never in command positions.

Or maybe Rodenberry was just trying to ease us into the Brave New world.

Blogger Noah B February 27, 2015 7:13 PM  

I would have sworn he was on Have Gun Will Travel and Maverick, but neither one shows up on his IMDB credits.

Blogger Carnivore February 27, 2015 7:20 PM  

I grew up on Star Trek. Among my buddies in the neighborhood, Spock was the standout character. Never liked Shatner and when I got older figured out why - his horrible overacting.

Saw Nimoy on stage as Sherlock Holmes, some time back in the early 80's or late 70's, Shubert Theater, Chicago. He did a fine job, but it was hard for me to see through the Spock stereotype back then.

Anonymous Daniel February 27, 2015 7:34 PM  

Kelley, of course, was older.

Yeah, but the new guy who plays Bones is old as Kelley was when he started the show. It is a stark difference.

I would say that Pegg is the closest of all the new actors to having any heft and touch of the originals. He definitely has it in his own movies. (Sgt. Angel has it in spades in Hot Fuzz).

Anonymous kfg February 27, 2015 7:40 PM  

"Or maybe Rodenberry was just trying to ease us into the Brave New world."

Rodenberry was not Commander in Chief. He had to fight for much of what he got.

Anonymous Daniel February 27, 2015 7:42 PM  

I remember him as a young hold-up guy in a Western show, but it was the Virginian or Gunsmoke or something. He was a good mean cowboy.

Blogger Noah B February 27, 2015 8:02 PM  

I had forgotten this, but Roddenberry was a writer for Have Gun Will Travel. I believe that's the first time he worked with Nimoy. But for whatever reason it doesn't appear in Nimoy's IMDB credits.

Anonymous sawtooth February 27, 2015 8:04 PM  

"Never liked Shatner...his over acting".

But for people who do impressions Captain Kirk is the gift that keeps on giving.

Blogger James Dixon February 27, 2015 8:09 PM  

> ...but about Kirk-Spock-McCoy.

Please. Have some respect for engineering. Kirk-Spock-McCoy-Scotty.
Yes, Scotty got short shrift compared to the big three. But he was just as important to many of the stories.

Anonymous Harsh February 27, 2015 8:48 PM  

Never liked Shatner and when I got older figured out why - his horrible overacting.

Shatner had a flamboyant style but he used it to great effect and created an iconic character in the process. If you want to see horrible acting, watch George Takei in, oh, any scene he appeared in. Good lord.

Blogger YIH February 27, 2015 9:51 PM  

rocean:
the only two women (Nurse Chapel and Uhura) are never in command positions.
It seems you never saw the pilot episode of TOS. Christopher Pike was the original Captain the First Officer was Majel Barrett ''Number One'' (AKA 'computer voice'/Nurse Chapel) and Nimoy's Spock was a minor character (and rather creepy-looking too).
When NBC greenlighted it as a series they called for a new Captain (Fatner of course), Barrett (AKA Mrs. Roddenberry) got demoted and Spock replaced ''Number One'' (now you know why Riker was nicknamed that) as First Officer/Science Officer.
The rest, as they say, is history.

Blogger Desiderius February 27, 2015 9:57 PM  

Cataline,

"Spock was one of us"

Yes, yes he was. Grew up looking forward each week to In Search Of...

God, I miss that common culture. Our elders now are so... unwise.

Blogger Desiderius February 27, 2015 10:04 PM  

It's almost painfully ironic how badly the pinkshirts mismeasure the ilk. As if Nimoy was a dudebro.

He was manly, wise, and faithful; three subjects which elude them to such an extent they seem alien themselves.

Blogger Desiderius February 27, 2015 10:08 PM  

"I would say that Pegg is the closest of all the new actors to having any heft and touch of the originals."

Bones was good in LotR. I like the reboot more than the Janeway crap, et. al. It's about as good as millennial types are going to do.

Anonymous Donn February 27, 2015 10:33 PM  

I hate the lensflare on the reboot.

Anonymous Tom B February 27, 2015 10:51 PM  

RIP. As sociopolitically idiotic Roddenberry was, his creation was arguably the best written show of the Sixties, (the Twilight Zone being the other contender) This was because they used the best SF writers of the day. As much as Shatner is lampooned as a hammy actor, watch him in Andersonville outshine the classically trained Richard Basehart. Watch him in The Brothers Karamazov out act Yul Brynner. Watch Star Trek: Generations and watch him kick Patrick Stewart's pasty British ass.

Nimoy's Spock was the counterpoint to Shatner's slight over exaggerating. Coupled with DeForrest Kelley's McCoy, as the wise sage/comic relief and you have the perfect tripod to hold the show above the sea of other less well written fare. The fact that the network did its best to kill the show off, first with a bad timeslot, then with a horrible producer (who nearly killed Wild, Wild West before it started, and killed Space:1999 by changing it from an attempt at serious SF to "monster-of-the-week" kiddie fare), just shows the stupidity of television execs. It was near perfection, and the know-nothing Hollywood types can't resist tinkering with perfection.

Typecasting occurs when such near perfection is achieved, a fact Nimoy seems to have accepted over time.

Blogger Josh February 27, 2015 11:25 PM  

Nimoy was a central figure in the rise of american christian cultural destruction

This is why you can't have nice things

Anonymous Jack Amok February 27, 2015 11:33 PM  

A good part of what makes his passing so momentous and so sad is the growing sense that something special is permanently leaving this world... I dunno if it's just me, but it seems like our world is getting smaller, flatter, and more colorless all the time.

Our world is made up of the people in it, and none of them live forever. Old ones pass away and new ones take their place. What you are feeling is the sense that the new ones aren't quite up to the task.

Nimoy tended to play intellectual characters, but how many of today's leading men would look like pantywaists next to him? He came from an era when even the smart, sensative guys were supposed to be able to throw a punch.

Hollywood isn't real life, and as Nate reminded us, Nimoy did more than TV. But... it's another instance where the shoes aren't being filled very well.

Anonymous Jack Amok February 27, 2015 11:33 PM  

For what it's worth:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/B-4K185UsAAX84U.jpg

Blogger rycamor February 28, 2015 12:20 AM  

RIP

Blogger ray February 28, 2015 12:56 AM  

'Nimoy was always very open about his faith in God, and that alone would have made him unusual in Hollywood. May God's eternal light shine upon him.'


Glad to hear he praised God. Maybe Leonard gets a call-back.

At least the series was masculine, in the stylized manner of those times. Kirk ('church') and Spock were both clearly guys, doing guy stuff. Spock's hyper-logic accentuated his maleness, instead of androgynizing him.

There go all the little lights! like waving around a sparkler.

Anonymous Greg February 28, 2015 1:16 AM  

He showed up in "Combat!" a few times. And did well, at that.

Anonymous Clay February 28, 2015 3:19 AM  

Who really gives a fuck? Spock was a space creature.

Nimoy was a non-person.....as far as I can tell. Yeah, lemme hear about his contributions, But lemme hear about his associations.

Anonymous Xolgbug February 28, 2015 7:41 AM  

Is Sulu dead yet? Bet that queer gets a bigger parade. Because faggotry.

Anonymous Jeigh Di February 28, 2015 7:58 AM  

"....Of all the souls I have encountered in my travels, his was the most human"

Way to go, Kirk. Insult your friend at his funeral.

I think Nimoy also played a martian or something in an old Buck Rogers or Flash Gordan serial.

Blogger Gordon February 28, 2015 10:38 AM  

After the first pilot was rejected by NBC, they agreed to pay for a second pilot. They were very worried about the Spock character, and made it very clear that Majel Barrett was not acceptable as a major character. The thing was, Roddenberry (who was married to someone else) was screwing Majel. So when the series came around, she was brought back as a blonde (vice brunette in pilot one) nurse. Roddenberry hoped the NBC brass wouldn't notice. They did, and asked one of the producers "Who's banging her?"

Meanwhile, Roddenberry fought for and managed to keep the Spock character. It was a big problem when Spock started getting about ten times more fan mail than Shatner, as Shatner was The Star. Nimoy was only making about $1000 per episode the first year, and Shatner was getting $5000.

Nichelle Nichols, who was cast as Uhura, was also one of Roddenberry's girlfriends. The producers tell a story about one studio secretary who was working late helping Roddenberry rewrite a script. Roddenberry hit on her, and she went with it. Just as they were getting naked, Majel Barrett shows up coming in the back way to the office. And then Roddenberry's wife starts coming in through the front. The dude did have a way with women.

Anonymous karsten February 28, 2015 1:12 PM  

"Nimoy was a non-person.....as far as I can tell. Yeah, lemme hear about his contributions, But lemme hear about his associations."

I agree. The number of people rushing to venerate this Leftist on this site is ridiculous.

And to broach a topic that usually seems to push the buttons of readers here, I find it funny how no one has yet mentioned that retch-inducing photography book which Nimoy published, showing pages upon pages of his photographs of grotesquely overweight women. And I mean, REALLY morbidly obese, not the 10-pounds-over-anorexic-fashion-model-size that manosphere types seem to find "fat."

But oh, wait -- Nimoy pretended he was a character whose words someone else scripted, and he said that he believed in God. So that must excuse his Leftist politics and his obesity-promoting photography. Sure.

And when someone points out in an immoderate way that he's a member of the Tribe that has, in fact, destroyed Western culture, of course readers here white-knight for the memory of the Leftist Jew and against the immoderate commentator.

That is the real reason why "we can't have nice things."

OpenID cailcorishev February 28, 2015 4:05 PM  

After the first pilot was rejected by NBC, they agreed to pay for a second pilot. They were very worried about the Spock character, and made it very clear that Majel Barrett was not acceptable as a major character.

Sometimes the suits are right. She was dull as dirt in the pilot. Also, Spock smiling was pretty weird, when you're used to the Stoic Spock of the rest of the series.

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