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Wednesday, February 18, 2015

The post-democratic EU

In keeping with their one-vote, one-time philosophy the Eurofascists have openly turned against democracy:
Alexis Tsipras believes the existing deal is a disaster and says he has a democratic mandate to demand changes. And this exposes democracy's limits within the European Union. The German finance minister Wolfgang Schaeuble says: "Elections change nothing. There are rules".

The president of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker said "there can be no democratic choice against the European treaties. One cannot exit the euro without leaving the EU".
A German Euzi named Juncker speaking out against democracy. Greece is doing exactly the right thing; leaving the EU is hardly a threat, it is the restoration and recovery of national sovereignty from a gang of fascists who have learned to use banks instead of tanks.

Niles Farage of UKIP understands what is at stake here:

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48 Comments:

Blogger Rek. February 18, 2015 8:15 AM  

Such contemptuous posturing. Sigma Varoufakis and greater beta Tsipras against the Euro gammas.

Blogger David February 18, 2015 8:37 AM  

The EU trans-national state was erected under cover of the drunken euphoria of "we are the world" love-ins and cultural tolerance, the stuff of manic social mood peaks (a very rare occurance, indeed.) As all states, it's just a larger version of Bastiat's gang of thieves.

I have no doubt whatsoever that by the time the Grand Supercycle correction reaches nadir, Europe's masses will be back to their favorite historical pasttime, albeit without the trenches, this go-around.

Blogger Guitar Man February 18, 2015 9:03 AM  

Nigel Farage is the type of man who would inspire men to run through brick walls for him.

Blogger Josh February 18, 2015 9:05 AM  

The president of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker said "there can be no democratic choice against the European treaties. One cannot exit the euro without leaving the EU".

Textbook gaffe right there

Blogger Shimshon February 18, 2015 9:06 AM  

"The German voters also seem determined to resist any further concessions. 76% oppose any reduction in Greek debt."

The German voters have spoken on what Greeks should do. There's your democracy!

Anonymous cheddarman February 18, 2015 9:08 AM  

Greece still needs to dismantle their welfare state. IMO the need to fund their welfare state with someone else's money will keep them in the EU for now.



Anonymous Old Man in a Villa February 18, 2015 9:12 AM  

"Neither a borrower nor a lender be."

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus February 18, 2015 9:15 AM  

But why doesn't he DO SOMETHING!!?? Like table a report.

The EU as problem-solving mechanism, in a nutshell.

Anonymous Alexander February 18, 2015 9:17 AM  

I don't suppose there is a way to invest in lamppost futures...

Anonymous rienzi February 18, 2015 9:26 AM  

I especially enjoyed Mr. Farage's remarks about the EU's attitude that treaties bind parliaments forever regardless of any future elections or plebiscites.

So how was Abe Lincoln's position on secession any different from that of the current Euro-fascists? As I recall, the southern states held plebiscites on secession. The people voted to leave.

I bet the PTB in the EU wish they had the ability to use tanks and not banks against Greece at this juncture. Just like another German politician did back in 1941.

Blogger sykes.1 February 18, 2015 9:39 AM  

The Greek economy cannot repay the debt, and default is all but guaranteed. Moreover, their olive/tourist economy cannot sustain a northern European lifestyle, and their current economic depression (GDP down 25%, 26% unemployment) will get substantially worse.

If Syriza does cave in to EU threats, there will likely be a coup d'etat. Then, the EU/NATO will have to decide whether to intervene militarily and impose a puppet state. I bet they will.

The US attempt to do the same in Ukraine appears to be unravelling, and the Debaltsevo pocket may be collapsing. Wikileaks claims Poroschenko has been a US puppet since 2006. What happens next?

Anonymous Anubis February 18, 2015 9:39 AM  

"I don't suppose there is a way to invest in lamppost futures..."

Lampposts are too durable/reusable I would invest in rope.

"Nigel Farage is the type of man who would inspire men to run through brick walls for him."

I would settle for one that would inspire men to impale savages on spikes.

Blogger James Dixon February 18, 2015 9:45 AM  

> The Greek economy cannot repay the debt, and default is all but guaranteed

They're already at the point of having to borrow money to repay their borrowed money. Of course, so are we.

Blogger Titus Quinctius Cincinnatus February 18, 2015 10:18 AM  

Wir brauchen einen Rechtstaat weider!

Blogger Xmas February 18, 2015 10:19 AM  

Sykes,

It's a bigger problem than just the Greeks wanting to live a Northern European lifestyle. They want a Northern European lifestyle while still keeping the Greek standards of civic commitment. It's not their welfare state that's the problem, it's the state itself. The Greek's have 4000 years of practice in tax avoidance because half the country's working population are tax collectors in some form or another (inspectors, bureaucrats needing fees, and so on.)

The "austerity" the Greeks fear isn't the end of the welfare state, it's 10s of thousands of penny-ante dictators losing their positions as graft collectors. As with any government encrusted by bureaucratic shitworms, the first thing they do when the money runs out is stop welfare payments, to get the hoi polloi angry. But really, they should take a deep look at their laws and regulations and get rid of system that requires 10 different inspectors to open a hair salon.

Blogger Brad Andrews February 18, 2015 10:20 AM  

On the video:

The questioner seemed to be practicing the "Disqualify, disqualify, disqualify" script.

His pink tie did jump out at first. I have to wonder if that was chosen on purpose.

Interesting speaker. I had only read about him before.

Blogger Sam Hall February 18, 2015 10:35 AM  

Interesting speaker. I had only read about him before.

I assure you that was restrained compared to his normal fire-breathing speeches

Blogger JP February 18, 2015 10:39 AM  

@Sam Hall.

This is still my favourite parliamentary speech of all time.

Anonymous p-dawg February 18, 2015 10:49 AM  

I don't get all the fuhrer about anti-democratic Germans. I just can nazi a problem.

Anonymous Miserman February 18, 2015 10:57 AM  

I've heard it said that Democratic Socialism is merely a transition from genuine Democracy to totalitarian Communism.

Anonymous zen0 February 18, 2015 11:03 AM  

....ambling down Downing street, Yanis Vaourfakis....

AAAH-OOOOH, Werewolves of London, AAAH-OOOOH......

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus February 18, 2015 11:05 AM  

Xmas: "Sykes,

It's a bigger problem than just the Greeks wanting to live a Northern European lifestyle."

Yes.

Xmas: "They want a Northern European lifestyle while still keeping the Greek standards of civic commitment."

That's not the bigger problem.

Northern Europeans aren't going to keep a Northern European lifestyle either. (Nor is keeping Greek standards of civic commitment an option, no matter what lifestyle one would prefer to go with it.)

For example, the Swedes are bleeding out, genetically and culturally. Maintaining a Northern European lifestyle in an ever more Muslim-dominated city that runs at the expense of the whites for the benefit of the non-whites is unsustainable.

The Titanic has hit the iceberg, and the usurpers who have become the ship's crew are vigorously holing all lifeboats but their own. Whether you squat on a Greek stool or recline on a Swedish lounge is no longer the real issue, if it ever was.

We are on the brink of the end of us. It's a huge transformation, that as far as our rulers and deadliest enemies are concerned must take place. That is the bigger problem.

Blogger Josh February 18, 2015 11:08 AM  

Another factor that enabled northern Europeans to enjoy a northern European lifestyle was the subsidy of their defense spending by NATO.

If you don't have to spend money on a military because of US treaty obligations, you can spend more on social welfare programs.

Anonymous Porky February 18, 2015 11:14 AM  

We are on the brink of the end of us.

Who's "us"?

Anonymous Difster February 18, 2015 11:15 AM  

I don't have a lot of respect for politicians in general, but I like Farage. He's not quite a libertarian but seems the closest thing to it in Europe.

Anonymous Susan February 18, 2015 11:24 AM  

Nigel Farage is coming across the pond to speak about the commonality of political problems our two Countries share. He will be speaking at a CPAC conference in September IIRC what date the article mentioned.

Naturally, the left is absolutely blowing steam out of their ears over this. They know what kind of respect he has both here and in his home Country. Funny, they have no problems spending our tax monies to try and influence Israeli elections, but the idea that Nigel will speak at CPAC? Appalling.

Anonymous zen0 February 18, 2015 11:25 AM  

Long ago, there existed great orators in the political sphere in America.

No noble speaky longtime

Anonymous Pogo February 18, 2015 11:29 AM  

@ Porky Who's "us"?

We have met the enemy and he is us.

Anonymous LES February 18, 2015 11:48 AM  

I once read that wealth is created by manufacturing, farming, mining and fishing. All other forms of earning money are derivatives of these. Banking, investing and speculating create money but not wealth.

When the present money system fails farmers will still farm and miners will mine. People with real skills will create goods and provide necessary services even if they resort to barter. What valuable skills does the investor class have that give their labor any value?

OpenID cailcorishev February 18, 2015 11:55 AM  

"there can be no democratic choice against the European treaties."

"At the moment what we have to think about is our survival, not the form of our constitution. (We can always change that later, if we do not like it.)" -- Pisander, selling the Athenians on oligarchy.

Somehow it's never that easy to switch back from less-free to more-free. At least the Athenians had the real threat of defeat and destruction to explain their desperation. What was the European nations' excuse for joining this circle jerk?

Anonymous jack February 18, 2015 12:05 PM  

@ Alexander February 18, 2015 9:17 AM

I don't suppose there is a way to invest in lamppost futures...

Might try here.....

http://www.alibaba.com/showroom/lamp-post.html

Blogger Danby February 18, 2015 12:31 PM  

@LES said
"When the present money system fails farmers will still farm and miners will "mine."
Unless their land, tools, seed and stock are seized.
Most farmers, and ranchers are operating on razor-thin margins and using leased or mortgaged equipment. You can't harvest 600 acres of soybeans without a $600,000 combine harvester. The only way to get that combine is either to make a loan or take a lease. Either way, the bankers own it and control you. Existing and coming environmental regulations put the dept of Agriculture, the EPA and frequently Army Corps of Engineers in more control of how you use your land and how you manage your farm than you are.

Mining has a similar, and probably worse situation, as they are far more regulated, the equipment is even more expensive, and they usually have to deal with unions as well. That's why so many materials are simply no longer mined and so many mines have shut down in the US. It's not that the ore isn't there, it's just not profitable to get it out of the ground as things stand.

Blogger Danby February 18, 2015 12:36 PM  

I thnik what happened in Europe is that no-one wanted a return of National Socialism. Since Socialism is obviously good, they had to get rid of Nationalism. So they've been trying for 70 years, initially at the insistence of the US, to deracinate the entire population of Europe.

And so far it's worked.

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus February 18, 2015 12:36 PM  

Right. Who creates value has nothing to do with who has power. Except that powerful swindlers will wind up owning the means of production, and will then declare themselves the productive ones.

Anonymous cheddarman February 18, 2015 12:41 PM  

"I thnik what happened in Europe is that no-one wanted a return of National Socialism. Since Socialism is obviously good, they had to get rid of Nationalism. So they've been trying for 70 years, initially at the insistence of the US, to deracinate the entire population of Europe.

And so far it's worked."

Danby,

the socialism in the US and Europe is balanced upon an unstable pyramid of debt that will eventually collapse. Dont despair, freedom will be forced upon us again, whether we want it or not.

Blogger Danby February 18, 2015 1:01 PM  

Well, the Greeks, being Greeks, have figured out that the anti-nationalist project isn't working. So they've evidently decided to go Nationalist again, but they still refuse to give up Socialism.
Should be interesting to see where they go with it.

Blogger frigger611 February 18, 2015 1:03 PM  

This comment has been removed by the author.

Blogger frigger611 February 18, 2015 1:14 PM  

Welfare state = Bureaucratic state
Note that all socialists (Obama), having not the intellectual wherewithal nor the humility to simply stand back and allow free markets to works and to flourish - "create" jobs and prosperity by increasing the number of posts in the government, and increasing the pay in those posts.
Obama's record is clear here.
The more a society tends toward socialism/communism, the more inspectors, bureaucrats and petty domestic spies are needed to keep the scheme going - since it is a scheme that Natural Law does not support. Guns and prisons do the work of driving the workers onward. In a free society the incentive to inspire the worker is naturally derived from the idea that one can improve his own life.

Anonymous not seeing it February 18, 2015 1:17 PM  

"Wait a sec...if we leave the EU, will we still be allowed to flood our country with Subsaharans, Saharans and Pakis? If not, then we better think this through," said no Greek.

Blogger praetorian February 18, 2015 2:19 PM  

"I just can nazi a problem."

(cerealspit)

Anonymous Porky February 18, 2015 2:50 PM  

Hemingway had a bit of insight into the Greeks.

In On the Quai, the Greeks were being evacuated but couldn't bring their mules on the boat. Their solution was to break the animals' forelegs and throw them into the water to drown.

It would appear everything is still the same, but the mules are much bigger this time.

Blogger Scintimandrion February 18, 2015 4:40 PM  

The problem with voting publics is that they make very poor client kings.

Anonymous Rhys February 18, 2015 5:23 PM  

I don't have a lot of respect for politicians in general, but I like Farage. He's not quite a libertarian but seems the closest thing to it in Europe.

Farage is a patriot, which is so out of fashion these days along politicians, its almost quaint.

Blogger Mekadave February 18, 2015 10:53 PM  

Slightly OT, I hope these jerks don't come through your way, Vox:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/islamic-state/11418966/Islamic-State-planning-to-use-Libya-as-gateway-to-Europe.html

Blogger Akulkis February 19, 2015 2:22 AM  

"I don't have a lot of respect for politicians in general, but I like Farage."


That's because Farage ain't a politician, he's a patriot, and not just a patriot, but a patriot who aims to be a statesman.

Calling Farage a politician is ... there are no words....

Blogger Akulkis February 19, 2015 2:28 AM  

Wow, Rhys.. just read your comment.

You and I sure do think alike!

Anonymous WildClaw February 19, 2015 11:32 PM  

At the current state, the US government has basically seized farmers by the balls. Meat producers (chicken for example) almost all work for 4 or 5 major corporations that keep them in lifetime debt. The cost of housing, machinery, feed, etc outweigh the profits that the farmer gains for himself, so he relies on loans just to make a living. As for agriculture, I believe that most food crops are subsidized by the government. If the farmers don't accept the subsidies, then they'll actually be losing money. Sucks to be a dead-end farmer right now.

Anonymous Wildclaw February 19, 2015 11:36 PM  

As for the Greeks, I remember reading a Time article about this Greek guy who had recently lost his job. And he's spending the last of what he has left at a party or concert with his girlfriend. When asked what he will do in the future, he replied with something like "Us Greeks want to enjoy the present. We'll try to deal with the future once we get there." <--not direct quote this article was published 2-4 years ago.

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