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Sunday, March 29, 2015

Asymmetric warfare

The war in Yemen has now gone regional:
Saudi Arabia's King Salman said the military operation against the Houthis would not stop until Yemen was stable and secure. It will continue “until it achieves its goals for the Yemen people to achieve security,” he said.

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Sisi, meanwhile, endorsed the creation of a joint military force, saying the Arab world was at a crucial crossroad and facing unprecedented difficulties. “The challenges are grave,” Sisi told the Arab leaders, like Salman not mentioning Iran by name. “It is a huge responsibility, heavy and burdensome.”

A Houthi spokesman countered Saturday that Hadi was a “puppet” of the United States and Saudi Arabia. “Yemenis may not have great and strong weapons like Saudi Arabia and their allies, but they have strength, and faith in God will win this battle,” said Dhaif Allah Shami of the Houthi political office.

In Tehran, a government TV station reported that thousands of people took to the streets of Sana to voice their readiness to confront Saudi aggression. The station also reported Houthi militias moving toward the border of Saudi Arabia. A third night of airstrikes targeted military bases and air defense sites around Sana and destroyed stockpiles of weapons that the Houthi militia had seized, said Ahmed Hassan Asiri, a spokesman for coalition forces. There were also late-night reports of airstrikes on Sana’s civilian airport.

Yemen airspace remained exclusively under the control of the coalition, Asiri said, and the Houthis suffered “grave losses.” He said their capability is “weakening on a daily basis.” But he acknowledged that the Houthis were continuing a push toward the port city of Aden and were also mobilizing near the Saudi border.
As always, combined arms are the most effective. What appears to be happening so far is air forces versus ground forces, and the latter usually win as long as they can reach the enemy. But it appears that the Saudis are not confident that their ground forces will be sufficient to repel a Houthi invasion, otherwise they would not be looking for help from Egypt and other Arab countries.

80 Comments:

Anonymous frenchy March 29, 2015 8:53 AM  

Vox,

It's interesting that Mr Lind AND Eric Margolis say that Arab armies are sh_t.

Scott Horton recently did an interview with Eric and it was rather good.


The problem with the Saudis is also that they are trained by us, so that means they will fight like us--bump and grind tactics; drop bombs and hope that you'll win. They'd better come up with one hell of an IO campaign to go with their war if they want to keep the problem in Yemen.

Blogger Shimshon March 29, 2015 9:08 AM  

They don't even have to bring Saudi down to cause a serious problem. That of course would be huge. But if all they do is divert manpower from the Iraqi border, or if their American-equipped military can't do better than a standoff, that leaves the Iraqi frontier practically wide open. There are dark clouds forming.

Blogger TontoBubbaGoldstein March 29, 2015 9:10 AM  

The good ol' Law of Unintended Consequences.

What happens if the Egyptians/Saudis/Jordanians etc develop into a pretty lean mean fighting force by tangling with ISIS and Iranian proxies?

Oy vey!

Blogger Cataline Sergius March 29, 2015 9:13 AM  

Twenty years ago the Saudi military was predominantly built around regime protection and that was about it. I don't know what it's like today but I would be rather surprised if they have developed any kind of dedicated organic expeditionary capability.

Plenty of reason not to from the royal family's perspective. A successful general, is a worrying general. In Arab culture it would be impossible for said general, not to get ideas.

Anonymous Frank Brady March 29, 2015 9:17 AM  

The House of Saud has a problem and so do the establishment media covering the Yemen situation. It is being almost universally reported that the Saudis have deployed 150,000 troops on Yemen's border. That's quite an accomplishment inasmuch as the Saudi army consists of something like 75,000 troops. An even greater problem is that approximately one-half of Saudi Arabia's combat troops are from Yemen and that a significant percentage of Saudi oil fields are in territory occupied mainly by Shia Muslims.

Anonymous Steveo March 29, 2015 9:19 AM  

This might just as well topple the house of Saud. At some point a coalition of lesser family members will want all the marbles & they will be able to pay well. Purges anyone?

Anonymous Salt March 29, 2015 9:20 AM  

Certain interests do not want cheap oil and any kind of major ground war will put the oil fields at risk.

Blogger Derrick Bonsell March 29, 2015 9:32 AM  

Like every other air campaign I think that Asiri is overselling his force's success.

Also Egypt is full of its own unrest and the last time they intervened in Yemen they lost the Six Days War against Israel.

Anonymous Tallen March 29, 2015 9:34 AM  

the Saudis are not confident that their ground forces will be sufficient to repel a Houthi invasion

Houthis already live inside Saudi Arabia; the YEM-SAU border is quite porous. The Saudis have the potential for a nasty 4GW on north and south fronts by different parties. A decisive move in the south might head off one of those problems.

Anonymous zen0 March 29, 2015 9:44 AM  

Al-Tahaluf Al-A’shari is the Ten Nation Confederacy.

This war is no longer a war about Yemen, but a formation of a Sunni coalition they call it Al-Tahaluf Al-A’shari, literally the Ten Nation Confederacy which the media in English calls Ten Sunni-led Arab states.

In response to U.S. abandonment of Saudi Arabia and a response to Iran’s threat to the region, the Sunni Muslim world has risen to form a major unified force. The Coalition never informed the U.S. of its actions in Yemen fearing the U.S. is flirting with Iran.
Caricature of this new alliance is shown in the Arab media as a right-arm fist portruding out of the earth with the mark “There is No God But Allah and Muhammad Is His Messenger” the flag, badge and emblem of Islam stemming from Saudi Arabia.


The writer of this piece

Blogger Lovekraft March 29, 2015 9:57 AM  

Hey Vox. OT but just thought I'd bring to your attention the comment thread over at Judgybitch taking major swipes at you. Seems like the opposition is doing its best to sow discord. Fully expected, since they are getting desperate that they are losing the narrative.

http://judgybitch.com/2015/03/27/david-futrelle-redefines-the-words-sick-motherfucker/#comments

Blogger ScuzzaMan March 29, 2015 9:57 AM  

"But it appears that the Saudis are not confident that their ground forces will be sufficient to repel a Houthi invasion, otherwise they would not be looking for help from Egypt and other Arab countries."

Vox, and zen0:

I dont think so. This is classic US regional strategy: corral all regional allies under one administrative structure, and dominate that structure with money and weapons.

It "worked" in Europe while the USSR was there as a credible threat, and one could argue that the renewed offensive against Russia is really only a foil to keep the increasingly reluctant and economically troubled NATO countries under the umbrella of US control.

It is not going to to work as well in the Middle East, not least because everyone hates everyone, but also because you will struggle to find any two parties who perceive their interests as being aligned, outside of the desire to rule and to use the flow of US guns and butter to that end ...

Blogger Vox March 29, 2015 9:59 AM  

That's quite an accomplishment inasmuch as the Saudi army consists of something like 75,000 troops.

They do have a Saudi National Guard of 75k, which is probably the source of the total. But you're right, I very much doubt they have the entirety of their ground forces deployed on the border.

Anonymous Old Man in a Villa March 29, 2015 10:03 AM  

"the military operation against the Houthis would not stop until Yemen was stable and secure."

The beatings will continue until morale improves.

On a side note, When I went in to the military it took exactly 16 weeks to turn a half retard chubbo into a lean, mean fighting machine. We've been training middle east militaries, Iraq being ther latest, for about the same amount of time it would take to turn a second lieutenant into a general and these guys still aren't capable of running a functioning military?

Really?

What exactly would it take?

Blogger Vox March 29, 2015 10:12 AM  

Seems like the opposition is doing its best to sow discord.

No, that's just Gabrielle Guthrie. Looks like she's taken her trolling to new heights.

Anonymous Mike M. March 29, 2015 10:26 AM  

This could get very interesting. A straight-up Sunni vs Shia fight is predictable...the jokers in the deck this time are Israel and Obama.

I can very easily see Israel becoming part (possibly an unofficial part) of a Saudi/Jordanian/Egyptian alliance. It's not to the advantage of any of those nations to see Iran increase their power or get nukes.

Obama is another matter. I think he hates Israel even more than he hates the United States. The smart strategic move for the USA is to provide aid (notably ISR support) and get out of the way. My fear is that Obama will side openly with the Iranians.

Blogger ScuzzaMan March 29, 2015 10:28 AM  

@Old Man:

We're not training anyone to fight. We're training them to take easy money and modern weapons from a convenient source, so they'll be in good position after we pull out.

War is a racket.

Anonymous NorthernHamlet March 29, 2015 10:31 AM  

I dont think so. This is classic US regional strategy: corral all regional allies under one administrative structure, and dominate that structure with money and weapons.

I am admittedly less knowledgeable about military vs military, but I had thought something along these lines too.

Anonymous Leonidas March 29, 2015 10:44 AM  

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Sisi, meanwhile, endorsed the creation of a joint military force, saying the Arab world was at a crucial crossroad and facing unprecedented difficulties.

In other words, the next world war is now a reality on the ground whether we want to acknowledge it or not.

Blogger Plump Pleasant Plumber March 29, 2015 10:45 AM  

The Saudis are corrupt. They have serious internal problems. They have to rely on others to fight for them. They will fall, and the real consequences are going to be severe. You see, they can't fight for themselves. So, they'll all be beheaded. By the Wahabbis that are amongst them right now. Corrupt Arabs versus dead serious Iranians.....hmmmm.......it's gonna be interesting, that's for sure. I'll say this though, anything Obama is involved in is going to go sideways.

Anonymous Old Man in a Villa March 29, 2015 10:47 AM  

"War is a racket."

No argument from me, Smedley. I do find it interesting how no matter how many years or dollars are invested into "training an army" regardless of where it is done, it never gets done, unless it's Ft. Benning or Parris Island, in which case it's 4 months.

Anonymous Too-Soon-ami March 29, 2015 10:53 AM  

Old Man Villa: "We've been training middle east militaries, Iraq being ther latest, for about the same amount of time it would take to turn a second lieutenant into a general and these guys still aren't capable of running a functioning military? Really? What exactly would it take?"


Wide-scale gene therapy.

Blogger tweell March 29, 2015 10:57 AM  

Old Man, Col. Kratman explains the problem better than I ever could. Basically, it's cultural.

http://www.everyjoe.com/2014/09/01/politics/why-arab-armies-bad-worthless/

Blogger JaimeInTexas March 29, 2015 10:57 AM  

1) Sudi Arabia is trying to secure tthe northern shore of the Bāb al-Mandab. A tacit admition that the Saudis and the coalition cannot defend the Straight Of Hormuz?
2) If the Saudis put all, or most, of their military rsouces into Yemen, they are opening their flanks. The Iraqi flank specifically. An attempt to tempt a military incursion on that side? That would trigger certain country into full and direct involvement to "defend" an ally.
3) I wonder what the black Africans will do about overt Arab military action in Yemen.

Blogger Mr.MantraMan March 29, 2015 10:59 AM  

It is fun to watch Drudge go into gay Jewish hysteria, but I think it's all a sham act on the Israelis part. I believe they want the Muslims to fight, and nuclear power Iran is the catalyst

Anonymous Dan in Tx March 29, 2015 11:15 AM  

I too believe that the real thread to the Saudis is going to come from within. They will not fall to these rebel forces headed their way. They will fall from within. They are having to divert their forces to the border. Forces that up til now they have used to brutally maintain power for themselves. It is just a matter of time before they find themselves on the wrong end of the chopping block from their own people. Good riddance.

Anonymous Will Best March 29, 2015 11:21 AM  

I believe they want the Muslims to fight, and nuclear power Iran is the catalyst

If I could trust the US to stay the hell out of it, I would want that too. Things would be a lot simpler if a few dozen factions were whipped out and power was consolidated.

Blogger Plump Pleasant Plumber March 29, 2015 11:23 AM  

Arab societies are venal and corrupt. Just the way it is. And their soldiers are a reflection of their society. The House of Saud will be in a video before long, kneeling in the sand, as they're being beheaded. That's how this is going to end. We can frack. We'll be okay. Europe, well, Germany is going to run rampant again, I believe. Untermenschen and all that. This time, it will be obvious. The world is out to get Germany. Iran is going to come out ahead, as it becomes obvious that Saudi forces are a sham. And, yes, Obama is going to be the poison pill that screws EVERYONE that has anything to do with him.

Anonymous Luke March 29, 2015 11:25 AM  

tweell March 29, 2015 10:57 AM
"Old Man, Col. Kratman explains the problem better than I ever could. Basically, it's cultural.

http://www.everyjoe.com/2014/09/01/politics/why-arab-armies-bad-worthless/"


Already described in a classic analysis:

"Why Arabs Lose Wars" http://www.reddit.com/tb/293y88

Blogger JaimeInTexas March 29, 2015 11:35 AM  

When Saudi Arsbia falls, I wll throw a party. Then I will reflect and mourn the innocents who allways bear the brunt of war.

Anonymous Clay March 29, 2015 11:43 AM  

I forget which Israeli General, but, when asked why they seemed to win all the wars, he laughed, and said "it was easy. We were fighting Arabs".

Could be a lost comment. Of course, Israel has AT LEAST 200 nukes. And at least 6 nuclear submarines, which can launch nuke missiles, enough to destroy the Arab/Muslim world of importance.

And. They will do it.

Anonymous Fazool March 29, 2015 11:48 AM  

Can't they all just kill each other? Please Allah, make it so!

Blogger Plump Pleasant Plumber March 29, 2015 11:53 AM  

Well, as Napoleon said, never get in the way of your enemy destroying himself, IIRC. Part of the reason for all of this turmoil is that the oil market has changed drastically. Just how long do you think the House of Saud can bankroll a war? They'll fight to the last dollar. Iran will prove to be the only actor with a coherent strategy, I'm afraid. And as regards to Pakistani warheads, they'll end up in Iranian hands. The House of Saud has killed to many Arabs to escape vengeance.

Anonymous Clay March 29, 2015 11:55 AM  

BTW...I call the Israeli subs "nuclear" because they can launch nukes...not because of their propulsion. I actually think the Dolphin-Class submarines the Israelis have were made in Germany. Go figure.

Diesel/battery powered, and alarmingly quiet.

Anonymous Fazool March 29, 2015 11:55 AM  

"And. They will do it."

Hope they hurry.

Anonymous The other robot March 29, 2015 11:56 AM  

In Why Arabs Lose Wars it is amusing to find these two things separated by some distance:

Thus, the U.S. army in the 1930s evaluated the Japanese national character as lacking originality and drew the unwarranted conclusion that the country would be permanently disadvantaged in technology.

referring, I am sure to the amount of rote learning in Japanese and Asian education in general,

and:

Training tends to be unimaginative, cut and dried, and not challenging. Because the Arab educational system is predicated on rote memorization, officers have a phenomenal ability to commit vast amounts of knowledge to memory.

So, which is it? Criticisms of rote learning are bad? Or they are good? Perhaps the author simply doesn't care about consistency.

Anonymous Fazool March 29, 2015 12:07 PM  

The other robot March 29, 2015 11:56 AM

The Assad family did a fine job of getting rid of the Muzzie Bruthahood. Messy, nasty stuff, but maybe not really a war. Still, I tilt my turban to them for that fine work.

Blogger Derrick Bonsell March 29, 2015 12:31 PM  

"So, which is it? Criticisms of rote learning are bad? Or they are good? Perhaps the author simply doesn't care about consistency."

Whether it's accurate or not its certainly not inconsistent. The first case is talking about how the US thought the Japanese would be unimaginative, and in the second case he's talking about rote learning in Arab education systems leading to unimaginative officers.

Really making the exact same claim there. Completely consistent.

Anonymous The other robot March 29, 2015 12:41 PM  

Really making the exact same claim there. Completely consistent.

Well, firstly, it depends on whether or not my inference that the first claim relates to rote learning is correct or not.

I have not been able to find an online copy of the reference:

David Kahn, "United States Views of Germany and Japan," Knowing One's Enemies: Intelligence Before the Two World Wars, ed., Ernest R. May (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1984), pp. 476-503.

The article is available in Kahn's book "How I Discovered World War II's Greatest Spy" but is not in the preview available on Amazon. I am reluctant to pay the $43 to buy the book and cannot find it in any libraries I have access to.

However, the first statement I provides, which I copy here:

Thus, the U.S. army in the 1930s evaluated the Japanese national character as lacking originality and drew the unwarranted conclusion that the country would be permanently disadvantaged in technology.

if my view is correct is saying that you cannot make a valid claim that they are inferior, militarily, just because they make a strong use of rote learning.

Anonymous clk March 29, 2015 1:12 PM  

"Obama is another matter. I think he hates Israel even more than he hates the United States. The smart strategic move for the USA is to provide aid (notably ISR support) and get out of the way. My fear is that Obama will side openly with the Iranians."

You know if you want to be taken seriously you have to stop saying such silly things.... when you lead with sucharhetorical and demonstrably wrong statement, the rest of what you say can be safely ignored ... even if it makes sense. Oboma does hate the US, he is doing what he thinks is right... I tend to lean towards him being wrong but the reasons for what he is doint is not because he hates the US... or hates whites, christians etc... so just stop it please.

Anonymous clk March 29, 2015 1:13 PM  

Doesn't hate

Blogger Plump Pleasant Plumber March 29, 2015 1:14 PM  

No, the opinion that Arabs are inferior militarily is based on hard, recent experience. Arabs are basically tribal in nature, and they really won't support anything that goes against the tribe. The American opinion of the Japanese actually proved to be true, for the most part. The Japanese Army and Navy didn't cooperate with each other. Most of their military technology was based on the research of others. As for combat experience, they had a lot of practice slaughtering Chinese peasants. When it came down to the nitty gritty, Japanese Naval operations were betrayed by inferior intelligence operations, and a truly amazing faith in their encryption systems. They were derivative users of technology and tactics, not innovators. The reason why is basically feudal in nature, with a big helping of Shintoism. As for the Arab soldier, he has absolutely no reason to trust his officers. None. Are you aware that the average Saudi citizen believes that that are protected by a slave class of mercenaries? Arabs are accomplished liars, and that fact permeates their societies. And that nasty little truth is revealed in combat. They're worthless as soldiers because they're a product of their society. You see, failure is expected and accepted as the will of God. Corruption cannot produce soldiers.

Blogger Plump Pleasant Plumber March 29, 2015 1:23 PM  

And now we come to the main event.....do you really believe that Iran doesn't already have a motivated fifth column in place? Of course they do. There are major differences between Persians and Arabs. Fact is, the Iranians are deadly serious, and the Arabs are too corrupt to be able to fight effectively. Mercenaries are great, as far as that goes, and there are plenty to hire. But, they won't fight to the death, like the Persian soldiers will. The Arabs will cut and run at the first sign of a setback.

Anonymous Frank Brady March 29, 2015 1:23 PM  

@The Other Robot quoted the following, "Training tends to be unimaginative, cut and dried, and not challenging. Because the Arab educational system is predicated on rote memorization, officers have a phenomenal ability to commit vast amounts of knowledge to memory."

I don't know who the source was for this quote but "experts" in today's educational establishment have the same misplaced disdain for "rote memorization" as their "expert" counterparts in the health care establishment have for "fee-for-service". These folks, having wrecked the educational system, are now wreaking havoc on health care in the name of reform. It's a bit off-topic, but I can't help but observe that the result of "rote memorization" is knowledge, a commodity is very scarce supply among today's "graduates".
.

Blogger Plump Pleasant Plumber March 29, 2015 1:37 PM  

Frank, I'm afraid yore missing the point. Yeah, the faithful memorize the Koran. That has absolutely nothing to do with producing an effective soldier. True, western societies are ruining their youths, but what is being discussed here is the war starting right now. The House of Saud is in a bad spot. They can't buy loyalty. Everyone despises them, and with good reason. They are responsible for the virulent strain of Islam known as Wahabbism. And they've spread it all over the world by building mosques. So, that hungry wolf is back.....and it will be fed. Have you forgotten Osama bin Laden?

Anonymous Frank Brady March 29, 2015 1:37 PM  

@Plump Pleasant Plumber: You wrote, "Arabs are accomplished liars, and that fact permeates their societies."

On top of that, the "Royal Family" is completely dishonest and won't honor business commitments. A dozen years ago or so, we were retained to help the Saudis identify appropriate staffing patterns at King Faisal Medical Center in Riyadh. The work was completed on time and praised as excellent--which would have been well and good had the Saudis completed paying for it. This experience is now filed under "Several Thousand Dollars Worth of Lessons Learned."

Anonymous Frank Brady March 29, 2015 1:44 PM  

@Plump Pleasant Plumber, no, I haven't missed the point. I completely agree with you. I just didn't want the quoted post to inadvertently create the impression that it was an endorsement of the "rote memorization is bad" mantra, a favorite phrase of our uber-destructive educationists.

Anonymous Too-Soon-ami March 29, 2015 1:47 PM  

Frank Brady: "I can't help but observe that the result of "rote memorization" is knowledge, a commodity is very scarce supply among today's [health care] "graduates"."

There's an app for that now. Doctors can now use their brains to full potential, which is to write prescriptions and referrals.

Blogger Plump Pleasant Plumber March 29, 2015 2:00 PM  

Here's another problem.....who is going to tell the truth about the fighting in Yemen? Speaking of accomplished liars, our government and it's lapdog media?

Blogger JaimeInTexas March 29, 2015 2:01 PM  

Was it not Thomas E. Lawrence "of Arabia" that convinced the Hashemites to go into the Trans-Jordan to fight the Ottomans, and that gave Arabia to House Saud?

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus March 29, 2015 2:05 PM  

Shimshon: "There are dark clouds forming."

I don't see them. The Saudis are not our buddies.

Anonymous Stg58 / Animal Mother March 29, 2015 2:28 PM  

I agree with the Army's assessment if Japanese culture. I worked for a large Japanese instrumentation/automation provider. They do not Innovate. Just don't. They are very skilled users of derivative technology, and can take what you invented and make it a lot better, but they can't think of things themselves. I saw this first hand during my employ. The only reason that company has any success in the US is because 95% of the US workforce is American.

It was a foregone conclusion that Japan would lose WW2.

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus March 29, 2015 2:46 PM  

Stg58 / Animal Mother: "It was a foregone conclusion that Japan would lose WW2."

If so: another strike against Hitler's opinion that Pearl Harbor was a great opportunity to get on the winning side; the Japanese of course being predestined winners because of their racial superiority over Americans -- which at the time meant white Americans.

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus March 29, 2015 2:55 PM  

Frank Brady: "On top of that, the "Royal Family" is completely dishonest and won't honor business commitments."

This kind of knowledge you don't get from books.

The success of powerful ethnocentric groups in keeping their important, characteristic patterns of malign behavior out of "received" knowledge is a big part of why predicting the future based on "the best information" doesn't work.

Anonymous Stg58 / Animal Mother March 29, 2015 3:00 PM  

Frequent oil&gas business travelers take two passports to KSA. O e to give to the company or customer they are working with, and one to use to get out of the country with if things go wrong.

If Obama wants to shut down KSA, all he needs to do is restrict travel from the US. Their oil industry will collapse in six months without us maintaining it.

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus March 29, 2015 3:02 PM  

clk: "I tend to lean towards him being wrong but the reasons for what he is doint is not because he hates the US... or hates white..."

He spent twenty years in Jeremiah Wright's white-hating race cult, and didn't hear anything he thought was unacceptable. Either he hates whites, which is normal enough for blacks, or else he's deaf.

Anonymous Curtis March 29, 2015 3:17 PM  

I don't see them. The Saudis are not our buddies.

You mean they are not YOUR buddies.

But then, no one in the club invited you into their circle.

Anonymous Anubis March 29, 2015 3:40 PM  

Who to cheer for other than the reaper? I say a pox upon all their houses.

"Criticisms of rote learning are bad? Or they are good? Perhaps the author simply doesn't care about consistency."

The difference is the Japanese rote learn entire books, while arabs rote learn how many fingers they have. Common core math is the same way math is taught in Haiti.

"If Obama wants to shut down KSA, all he needs to do is restrict travel from the US. Their oil industry will collapse in six months without us maintaining it."

Their health care industry as well, pretty much every job that requires IQ muslim oil nations hire foreigners to do. If Europe through China did the same muslim oil nations wouldn't have running water. They offer jobs where you would earn over 3x what you would earn normally and you don't have to pay fed taxes on the first $90,000 of foreign earnings but the downside is you have to live in a prison like foreign workers place like the bombed Khobar Towers, you can go outside if you are a man but the question is do you want to risk going out for a smoothie and haba baba burger.

Anonymous Stg58 / Animal Mother March 29, 2015 4:00 PM  

I know some Shell analyzer engineers who were in KSA in a compound and not allowed to have alcohol. What would thirsty chemical engineers do in this situation?

Blogger Plump Pleasant Plumber March 29, 2015 4:27 PM  

Question is, what would they do if they discovered your still?

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus March 29, 2015 5:17 PM  

"I don't see them. The Saudis are not our buddies."

Curtis: "You mean they are not YOUR buddies."

No I don't.

Curtis: "But then, no one in the club invited you into their circle."

That's not the issue.

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus March 29, 2015 5:19 PM  

Anubis: "The difference is the Japanese rote learn entire books, while arabs rote learn how many fingers they have. Common core math is the same way math is taught in Haiti."

In sum: genes win again?

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus March 29, 2015 5:41 PM  

Old Man Villa: "What exactly would it take?"

Too-Soon-ami: "Wide-scale gene therapy."

And another vote for the importance of genes, which means race.

We know this is true, it's just that our dominant minority has made it "extremely reprehensible" (in Martin van Creveld's words) to plan on that basis.

It's as though hostile rulers had made it "extremely reprehensible" to build our houses on the assumption that gravity exists. Bad results would be baked into the blueprints; cumulative failure would be inevitable; the results would look like Detroit. And they do.

Militarily, it's no better. All respectable planning starts with a bunch of whopping big lies, which can't be questioned on pain of career death. The results are disappointing, but never mind: tax revenues from the helpless proles are endless.

Until they won't be. But never mind that either; our rulers are so hostile that they always wind up arguing a position that leads to a world without white people.

After that, the Elders of Wye think China should be their next host. (Which is one reason not to envy the Chinese.)

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus March 29, 2015 5:47 PM  

Curtis: "But then, no one in the club invited you into their circle."

Actually, the credentials of the Saudies even to be seen as skilled and benevolent leaders of Muslim Arabs in the Middle East are dubious.

The credentials of the Iranians to be considered steady patrons of Shi'ite power look better.

Blogger Derrick Bonsell March 29, 2015 6:22 PM  

Iran used to be a pretty screwed up country that couldn't do anything right. In the 80s they made the Iraqis look GOOD and gave us a lot of misconceptions of Saddam's capabilities. 1991 busted Iraq's rep wide open and by extension the Iranians.

Iran got to square off against US troops in Iraq and while they no doubt got a bloody nose from doing so they certainly learned a lot of lessons.

Blogger JaimeInTexas March 29, 2015 6:22 PM  

Older couple, with a long history of close friendship with my parents, lived in Saudi Arabia. He was a Chem. Eng. and got on one of those 2 yr. contracts with Aramco. She travelled in Europe a lot during that period. He told me about the the blaming "it is god's will" everything.

A young couple I knew very well got on with Aramco. She hated it and ended hating the Saudis.

A fellow programmer, back circa 1990, used to fly recon jet (wild weasel?) when stationed in Germany. He said he got out of the AF when he witnessed female pilots being given pasding grades where the male pilots would not. Once he told me of a instructor he knew, that was sent to Saudia to train pilots, that one time, a trainee went into a stall and he simply let go of the controls and stated "it is in allah's hands" (or words tobthst effect) and the instructor had to take control of the airplane.

Blogger JaimeInTexas March 29, 2015 6:24 PM  

tobthst => to that

Blogger Plump Pleasant Plumber March 29, 2015 6:56 PM  

Just think.....saving the Wahabbis who are behind a lot of the trouble we face today. How about we do what's good for our tribe? You know, the white folks who keep everything going? Tell you what.....helping anal orifices who would gleef

Blogger Plump Pleasant Plumber March 29, 2015 6:59 PM  

Sorry about that....if these Islamist clamor for our blood, well, take them seriously. None of those Arabs or Persians would pee on us if we were on fire. Obama can be contained. He may actually go mental, and end up medicated.

Blogger JohnG March 29, 2015 7:19 PM  

When I was with 5th SFG, we regularly trained and evaluated the armies over there. The Saudi ground forces are worse than most of them, and the really good ones (like the Egyptian 999) weren't that good, barely competent. Ground forces in a lot of those places is equal parts penis envy (I have 50,000 infantry!) and a welfare program.

Blogger Corvinus March 29, 2015 7:32 PM  

Iran used to be a pretty screwed up country that couldn't do anything right. In the 80s they made the Iraqis look GOOD and gave us a lot of misconceptions of Saddam's capabilities. 1991 busted Iraq's rep wide open and by extension the Iranians.

I suspect as Iran was an explicitly Islamic state, whereas Iraq was an explicitly secular one, made the difference there. Iraq had a Christian minority, and it's possible that there were enough Christian officers who increased the quality of the Iraqi army just enough for it to hold out against the Iranian forces. But even so, neither could really win against the other.

Blogger Corvinus March 29, 2015 7:34 PM  

Overall, I think the reason why Muslim armies are worthless now, as opposed to when Islam first came on the scene, is due to most of them being essentially entirely Muslim. Only Lebanon, Syria, Egypt, and Jordan have a substantial number of Christians who lift the respective country's army from "an absolute disaster" to "nearly an absolute disaster".

Anonymous Stg58 / Animal Mother March 29, 2015 7:42 PM  

Onward Christian Soldiers indeed.

Anonymous Frank Brady March 29, 2015 8:09 PM  

@Derrick Bonsell

You wrote, "Iran got to square off against US troops in Iraq and while they no doubt got a bloody nose from doing so they certainly learned a lot of lessons."

It did? When?

Anonymous Frank Brady March 29, 2015 8:12 PM  

@Corvinus: You wrote, "Overall, I think the reason why Muslim armies are worthless now, as opposed to when Islam first came on the scene, is due to most of them being essentially entirely Muslim."

Explain that theory to the Turks. I'll hold your coat.

Anonymous Stg58 / Animal Mother March 29, 2015 10:17 PM  

I don't think Turks are Arabs, so maybe it's just that. I have read some of Sennels' work that says a large percentage of Turks are inbred.

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus March 29, 2015 10:50 PM  

Stg58 / Animal Mother: "I don't think Turks are Arabs, so maybe it's just that."

Why wouldn't it be just that? That's plenty.

Anonymous map March 30, 2015 12:37 AM  

http://www.your-poc.com/sources-say-erik-prince-was-hired-by-crown-prince-of-abu-dhabi-to-put-together-a-800-member-battalion/

Blogger Corvinus March 30, 2015 2:38 PM  

Explain that theory to the Turks. I'll hold your coat.

Actually, simple, and further corroboration: Janissary blood.

Even the Turks realized that Christian boys made better soldiers. There'd be no point in going to the effort of establishing Janissaries otherwise.

Anonymous Eric the Red March 30, 2015 3:04 PM  

If the House of Saud is toppled, then a sudden loss of faith in the stability of the petrodollar is not far behind. Then there goes the US economy, right down the proverbial sweet crude oil well.

Does this constitute a black swan event, or instead is it highly predictable? Maybe this is what those forces pulling Obama's strings wanted all along.

I swear, I really hate this line of speculation.

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