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Sunday, March 22, 2015

Civil disobedience

The Germans aren't exactly known for it, but when they do it, they do it well:
“A few years ago the German Minister of Justice—kind of like the Attorney General here in the United States—he was pushing very hard for Germans to have biometric data on their national ID cards, and he wanted all Germans to be fingerprinted. And the Germans pushed back, particularly privacy advocates and those in the Chaos Computer Club. And so what they did is when the German Minister of Justice was out at a restaurant, they went ahead and after he left they got the glass that he had left behind, and they were able to lift his fingerprint off of the glass. They then took a photograph, brought it into Photoshop, cleaned it up, and then were able to replicate it on 3D printers, in latex. … [They] included it as a handout in their Chaos Computer Club magazine that went out to 5,000 people, and they encouraged their readers to leave the Justice Minister’s fingerprints at crime scenes all over Germany, which they did.”
This points out the only way one can reasonably expect to gain any privacy, which is by flooding the system. It is a known fact that figuring out what information is valuable is much harder than obtaining raw data in the first place, so rather than futile attempts to lock things down, one's focus should be in flooding the data collectors with vast quantities of meaningless information.

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36 Comments:

OpenID simplytimothy March 22, 2015 4:38 PM  

awesome.

Anonymous fish March 22, 2015 4:44 PM  

This points out the only way one can reasonably expect to gain any privacy, which is by flooding the system.

So much noise....so little signal!

Anonymous JN March 22, 2015 4:59 PM  

Which is why the NSA spying thing doesn't bother me that much. If they were spying on ME but not many others I would be paranoid and livid. But when its Entire Freaking World. Good luck with that...

Anonymous Salt March 22, 2015 5:03 PM  

Mark Goodman, who wrote the article, says he wants to win this battle against hackers. My best regards these days lie more with the fox than with the hound. It's also the hound's fault.

Blogger ScuzzaMan March 22, 2015 5:05 PM  

JN: they're not "spying" on you, i.e. they're no watching you in realtime. That's a fools errand and they know it. The talk about preventing impending attacks is just trash they borrowed from the torture warriors.

The point of the data base is to destroy people after the fact; to either troll through the data for something incriminating of embarrassing (in politics often more effective than frank criminality) or to concoct something, using all the real data on you as a template.

Worry about it or note, though, they're not going to stop.

Anonymous Ain March 22, 2015 5:13 PM  

That's bad enough. If you end up on the radar of government agents that are already known to have abused power, they already have a wealth of information on you that they were never supposed to have.

Anonymous Stilicho March 22, 2015 5:14 PM  

This technique and more like it need to go viral.

Scuzza, at some point such tactics start creating victims with nothing to lose. Good luck with avoiding that.

Anonymous cecilhenry March 22, 2015 5:38 PM  

Nice jobs Germans. Nice job.

We need more civil disobedience to the genocidal totalitarianism we have in the WEst.

Blogger Wayne Earl March 22, 2015 5:41 PM  

This is why Snowden is mostly a red herring.

Also, consider what Vampires teach us about a search warrant, where Snowden is not a red herring.

Anonymous Daniel March 22, 2015 6:04 PM  

If I were to ever meet the mastermind at CCC, I'd shake that guy's hand.

On second thought...

This presents an interesting opportunity for a thief. Rubber gloves are out: pre-printed ones could provide double-cover: red herring (directing police to a preposterous suspect) and then in court (come on, yer honor - they also found Lenin's fingerprints at the scene. Is this joker of an attorney actually suggesting we both pulled this caper?)

Anonymous guest March 22, 2015 6:21 PM  

Lifting prints is so passé... "A speaker at the yearly (2014) conference of the Chaos Computer Club has shown how fingerprints can be faked using only a few photographs. To demonstrate, he copied the thumbprint of the German defense minister." via

Anonymous Rick Johnsmeyer March 22, 2015 6:22 PM  

As I understand it, Equifax/Experian/etc. consumer credit reporting agencies don't operate in Germany because it's illegal for companies to aggregate that type of data about private German citizens. That's something I find rather admirable about them.

It disappoints me how much Americans have been willing to prostate and subserviate themselves to powerful organizations, governmental or "private." The overall attitude is very defeatist in many ways, to the point where those organizations have become unchallenged and perhaps unchallengeable in the current order.

Consider something as absurd as men volunteering themselves to have other men watch them piss into cups in order to obtain a wide range of jobs. At one point, that would have gotten the watcher badly beaten. Now men actually VOLUNTEER themselves for this.

It's a certain species of mass-psychology that has become predominant over time in which personal privacy is simply not valued at all by Americans. Good to see that not all westerners have slipped yet into this mentality.

Blogger Res Ipsa March 22, 2015 6:53 PM  

Awesome! You've gotta love it.

Now if we could do the same thing for Eric Holder...

Blogger automatthew March 22, 2015 7:23 PM  

#drownthesignal

Anonymous CK March 22, 2015 7:25 PM  

"Consider something as absurd as men volunteering themselves to have other men watch them piss into cups in order to obtain a wide range of jobs. At one point, that would have gotten the watcher badly beaten. Now men actually VOLUNTEER themselves for this."

Not if you have Paruresis you can't help but want your privacy. But there is still little in the way of protections/rights stateside and MUCH discrimination/firing still taking place from the busyness/government sectors if you don't submit to their invasion of your privacy.

Anonymous The Spy March 22, 2015 7:25 PM  

Shut them down....FIGHT THE POWER.....Let's give them some serious signal to noise ratio to contend with.

We can do this.

Anonymous Harsh March 22, 2015 7:40 PM  

Isn't there an old proverb about Germans and revenge? There should be.

Blogger bob k. mando March 22, 2015 8:48 PM  

Rick Johnsmeyer March 22, 2015 6:22 PM
Consider something as absurd as men volunteering themselves to have other men watch them piss into cups in order to obtain a wide range of jobs.



you are delusional.

Anonymous Jack Amok March 22, 2015 9:12 PM  

The point of the data base is to destroy people after the fact; to either troll through the data for something incriminating of embarrassing (in politics often more effective than frank criminality) or to concoct something, using all the real data on you as a template.

Yes, I worry less about the massive data gathering uncovering embarrassing information than about the massive data gathering being used to legitimize faked data.

"Why, Mr. Smith, here's surveillance footage of you leaving the dead hooker's, er, I mean, dead sex worker's apartment. And here's cell phone records placing you in the neighborhood, and here's a credit card receipt for your purchase of of a hunting knife identical to the one found buried in the victim's heart..."

Anonymous BigGaySteve March 22, 2015 9:19 PM  

This is how they got General Petraeus, they may have even planted false evidence on him. I forget what its called , some kind of reconstruction, but there is something where they take the illegal data and use it to find a way to claim they got the info a legitimate way, yea we just rolled our face over the keyboard and it popped up.

Next time GayNBA star Jason Collins leaves the white house someone needs to get Obama's prints off of his balls.

Blogger mmaier2112 March 22, 2015 10:08 PM  

Oh no............ That's a visual I coulda done without...

Blogger mmaier2112 March 22, 2015 10:09 PM  

Though if his prints are in evidence at crimes all over ... why is the prick not in jail? The law's the law, right?

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus March 22, 2015 10:30 PM  

Jack Amok: "Yes, I worry less about the massive data gathering uncovering embarrassing information than about the massive data gathering being used to legitimize faked data."

I am less concerned with that than with the character of men who have spent a lifetime not accessing potentially politically inconvenient information sources, including conversation.

Suppose we accept it is true that John Roiberts, now Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, never in his life (before his confirmation hearings) happened to have a conversation where Roe v. Wade came up -- what does that say about him, and does one wish to he ruled and led by people like that? I mean people who for the sake of the careers they hoped for have kept themselves completely ignorant of the most important matters, and who are therefore forced to rely on the shallow and deceitful false wisdom of assumptions built into the passing chatter of corrupted mass media and academic sources?

Is it good if future leaders, for fear that anything they do may be recorded and later used against them, only have friends that are willing to treat them as hot-house flowers, never challenging them with tough questions and demanding real answers?

The impact of surveillance is much less than the impact of assumed total surveillance plus moral cowardice and cultivated ignorance.

Blogger bob k. mando March 22, 2015 10:41 PM  

OT, Obama has succeeded in giving another 1/2 billion dollars of equipment to Islamic terrorists:
http://pjmedia.com/richardfernandez/2015/03/22/losing-yemen/

i know that we're all shocked and amazed that this has eventuated.

again.

Anonymous The other skeptic March 22, 2015 10:59 PM  

If there was a drug that could turn queers to non queers would the media be so pleased

Anonymous Titus Didius Tacitus March 22, 2015 11:00 PM  

“I think it’s worth asking the question: What should and should not be online? There is a movement among some companies to take certain things out of the electronic realm. So companies like Kentucky Fried Chicken and McDonald’s, they have secret recipes for both Coke and their fried chicken. Those are not stored in any electronic systems. Those are written down on a piece of paper and kept in a safe. And after the Snowden revelations, the Kremlin, for their secret communications in Moscow, went back to typewriters—manual typewriters, not even electronic typewriters, but manual typewriters—to type things. So I think you will see some stepping back away from this digital stuff.”

Good thinking.

I wonder if there will be index card libraries, with very interesting information.

Blogger maniacprovost March 22, 2015 11:23 PM  

"flooding the data collectors with vast quantities of meaningless information."

So what you're saying is, Tumblr is leading the fight against government surveillance?

Anonymous The other skeptic March 23, 2015 12:40 AM  

flooding the data collectors with vast quantities of meaningless information

Wasn't that one of the techniques from one of Kratman's books? Spray everything with water that had some amount of nitrates or whatever in it so that dogs or other sensors would see lots of false positives.

Blogger LP 999/Eliza March 23, 2015 12:41 AM  

When a people had enough they act. Angela M's hands are tied once the banks came back seeking a version of revenge the world was too dumb to see we are slaves of central banks. Some of the worlds economies were at its knees. It does not matter is she blackmailed as she allows things to happen there, what is more telling is no one but the people took responsibility, no operation anonymous needed. 'Operation never again anonymous' is here.

Blogger Doom March 23, 2015 1:24 AM  

Here, now, if the attorney general were found to have been party to every crime, he'd get overtime, and probably a raise. Not sure that would work out with this current admin. They have no shame, or fear, and seem to need none. Same with their whole crew, to include the media. Just another branch of the government, at this point. Still, good on the Germans.

Anonymous Aeoli March 23, 2015 1:43 AM  

Yeah, that was in A Desert Called Peace. The space muzzies confound the occupiers' bomb sniffers that way.

Anonymous Just Mark March 23, 2015 4:07 AM  

Hey Vox

Want to drive the NSA crazy. Start selling one time pads through Castillia House.

Anonymous Mike M. March 23, 2015 8:52 AM  

This highlights just how stupid many politicians are - and how prone they are to magical thinking. You want fingerprints? Why? To what end?

If you can describe the end, and how what you propose to do will achieve that end, your argument will prevail. But most of these twits are thinking in terms of magic.

OpenID bc64a9f8-765e-11e3-8683-000bcdcb2996 March 23, 2015 10:22 AM  

I seem to recall another "brilliant" idea in the US War on Drugs, whereby trace amounts of cocaine on the currency in one's possession was considered prima fascie
Untill "somebody" checked the cash in The President's (and other "important people")
wallets.
CaptDMO

Blogger Titus Quinctius Cincinnatus March 23, 2015 11:48 AM  

I like it.

Blogger Robert What? March 23, 2015 12:53 PM  

This is good. The political and bureaucratic classes believe that they are not subject to the same laws, rules and regulations as the rest of us. If they did, we'd have 90% fewer laws, rules and regulations.

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