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Thursday, July 09, 2015

Garden porn

Frankly, I don't think there is really any other way to describe it. Extreme composting guru David the Good is now making videos:
Earlier this year, Marjory Wildcraft invited me to be a part of her Home Grown Food Summit. 

I agreed and hired my cousin (he almost volunteered, in fact, since it was a lot of work) to help me put together a good gardening presentation for the event.

The result was 13 Tips, Tricks and Lessons from Homesteading an Acre.

The video played live during the summit and was ranked among the top five presentations by viewers. It generated a lot of really good press but was only available as part of a multi-video package deal.

Until now!

I've set it free and am now offering the almost hour-long presentation for $4.99 as a video download for your enjoyment and gardening edification.
And I'm sure his fans will be delighted to note that David the Good is planning to follow up the very successful Compost Everything with two more books with Castalia House, one of which may even be released this year.

One will be focused on survival preparedness, the other on homeschooling.

Labels:

38 Comments:

Anonymous AlteredFate July 09, 2015 2:06 PM  

Oh, hell ya!

Blogger David The Good from FloridaSurvivalGardening.com July 09, 2015 2:13 PM  

I blame #GardenGate and the #RabidPeppers.

Blogger Double E July 09, 2015 2:18 PM  

Hey David, I'm in Gainesville and I have a Youtube channel about survival and preparedness. let me know if you want to do a video collaboration or interview sometime and we can meet up.

Blogger Student in Blue July 09, 2015 2:26 PM  

I'm betting that the homeschooling book will have the most divide and talk about it.

Any takers?

Anonymous You, Me, and Bud Dupree July 09, 2015 2:43 PM  

I didn't find anything in the book that new and startling to anyone who gardens yearly. Some of the tips and techniques were inventive but more a product of having way too much time on one's hands than anything else. The biggest problem with composting is the sheer volume needed to get enough material to make much of a difference - getting $10.00 bags of that Walmart organic starter soil as needed pretty much does the same thing. Now I know that in the post Road-Warrior collapse Walmarts won't be around but hey the fatties won't have Burger King or chlorinated water, either.

Anonymous BigGaySteve July 09, 2015 2:55 PM  

So when the Nigapocalypse happens Dupree will be fighting it out at Walmart for the last soyburger. Anything you grow in your garden will cost more than the walmart equivalent(especially in terms of hours/work/pay),but you will know how organic it is and how few illegal aliens touched it without washing their hands after a BM. An earth sheltered greenhouse with dwarf trees is outrageously expensive compared to E coli laden winter fruit. It would take decades for a greenhouse to pay for itself.

Blogger Mr.MantraMan July 09, 2015 2:58 PM  

Well worth the money

Anonymous Aeoli Pera July 09, 2015 3:11 PM  

No homo, but David has a very sexy voice, and I want him to make love to my butt.

...I said no homo!

Anonymous You, Me, and Bud Dupree July 09, 2015 3:18 PM  

Yes... it is worth the price of the e-book. The best luck I've had with composting is the use of a 36 gallon bin with the louver vents and 1,000 or so of the Red Wiggler worms, which he does talk about. The nitrogen that gets scattered over the garden as the wind passes through the bin seems to have an effect and a few plants have managed to get roots under the bin and in the casting laden soil itself and became monster plants. It's gathering material that's the problem. The finely ground mulch is a good, cheap option as well but it takes a few cycles for it all to decompose.

Anonymous cheddarman July 09, 2015 3:22 PM  

An earth sheltered greenhouse with dwarf trees is outrageously expensive compared to E coli laden winter fruit. -Big Gay Steve

BGS, you ought to rethink that statement, some types of e. coli can be quite nasty...i know these things, i wield the power of food science!

sincerely

Anonymous You, Me, and Bud Dupree July 09, 2015 3:29 PM  

The following comment is about as exciting as watching mulch decompose, but he does bring up a good conceptual point about the Earth functioning as a giant compost bin. This is the best response to all the high-fructose corn syrup succors (suckers?) who insist that conventional food is better than organic because the chemical/processed stuff doesn't break down (rot) as quickly. Well, food is meant to spoil quickly and start rotting, decomposing, etc. so it gets back in the "system." But that's bad for profits because, ya know, white nutritiousness bread lasts on the shelf MUCH longer. So there ya go.

Anonymous Dave July 09, 2015 3:47 PM  

You me & Bud,

I do believe you just killed this thread. Nothing left to even attempt to compost.

Anonymous RedJack #22 July 09, 2015 3:57 PM  

Dupree,

My neighbor, as payment for me tilling his garden, went and bought me a load of compost from the local compost facility. That crap was way to hot, and had tomato blight in it. Cut my yield in the garden by at least 50%. The stuff from walmart has so many weeds in it, you would be better buying the stuff they dig out of ditches in the rural areas.

Which is why I won't buy compost anymore.

Anonymous BGS July 09, 2015 4:17 PM  

BGS, you ought to rethink that statement, some types of e. coli can be quite nasty...i know these things, i wield the power of food science!

Did you really think I would prefer cheap E Coli ridden fruit picked by illegals that don't wash their hands after a BM to healthy equivalent home greenhouse grown food? Especially if I am planning to survive the nigapocalypse when the EBT card fails.Walmart loads its meat with carbon monoxide to keep it from showing its spoilage. http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/why-supermarket-meat-is-always-unnaturally-red/

Anonymous daddynichol #126 July 09, 2015 4:23 PM  

David,

Congrats on your continued success! Job well done.

Blogger JaimeInTexas July 09, 2015 4:30 PM  

Vox. You had no idea what you were getting into with this gardening stuff, did you. LOL

David the Good even made it to LewRockwell.

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2015/05/david-goodman/the-best-thing-for-your-survival-garden/

Anonymous 43rd Virginia Cavalry July 09, 2015 5:30 PM  

Mrs. Cavalry is a new fan, she will be thrilled.

Blogger CM July 09, 2015 7:17 PM  

I would definitely get the homeschool one.

If i can manage to grow a tomato plant and keep it alive to fruition, i'd get the compost book :p

Blogger David The Good from FloridaSurvivalGardening.com July 09, 2015 8:02 PM  

@ Double E

You're not too far away from me. Drop me an e-mail off the website at some point.

@ RedJack #22

Yes. The big problem with buying compost is just as you say. I've had thousands of dollars of plants destroyed due to contaminated manure. I make that point in the book. Within the last decade there have been herbicides approved with half-lives estimated at multiple years. Composting doesn't destroy them and they will utterly wreck your plants. It's usually not worth buying compost anymore... you're stuck making it. A lot of the "green" initiatives has also led to municipal waste (laden with heavy metals) being added to composting programs as "biosolids." I don't want that stuff in my food.

Anonymous Luke July 09, 2015 8:26 PM  

Slogan I've seriously considered having made into T-shirts or bumper stickers for my vehicles:

"Recycle environmentalists! They'd make good compost, they're so full of s**t."

Blogger David The Good from FloridaSurvivalGardening.com July 09, 2015 9:09 PM  

@Luke

I also like "Environmentalists: green on the outside, red on the inside."

Anonymous BGS July 09, 2015 9:29 PM  

"I also like "Environmentalists: green on the outside, red on the inside.""

I used to have a green hammer and sickle avatar like that "green is the new red" now I have the Clinton Gore 1992 confederate flag button in its place.

Blogger JaimeInTexas July 09, 2015 10:25 PM  

David, ard you familiar with Calathea allouia, aka leren (lerenes, in plural), aka Topi Tambo?

Blogger David The Good from FloridaSurvivalGardening.com July 09, 2015 11:12 PM  

@JaimeInTexas

No - I've never grown that one before. Just looked it up. I grow its cousin, arrowroot. Are you growing it? Taste good? Looks very interesting.

Blogger David The Good from FloridaSurvivalGardening.com July 09, 2015 11:13 PM  

@BGS

I saw a fellow in a black cowboy hat with a pickup truck drive past today with a huge Confederate flag flying in the bed of his truck. We all gave him a hearty wave.

Blogger JaimeInTexas July 09, 2015 11:36 PM  

The other day I was thinking about eating lerenes. It has been a long time since. The closest I can compare are water chestnuts.
Whi h, btw, I have been thinking of growing some. I have a water garden and I use plants for filtering -- pickerel hyacinth -- and a lower pond with a water lilly. I could add a tub, or equivalent, for chestnuts.

Anonymous RedJack #22 July 10, 2015 8:57 AM  

I know David. My neighbor bought it as a thank you for me helping him, and I felt I should take it to accept the thank you. I prefer to "Roll my own", and this locked it in for me.

I have started actively composting meat scraps. My Extension office neighbor officially said not to, but then told me over a beer it was ok as long as I bury it a bit. I need to buy him a copy of your book.

Blogger Cail Corishev July 10, 2015 9:16 AM  

The thing about composting, and the whole organic/sustainable/locavore gardening subculture, is that it's quite infested with vegetarians. Not everyone, of course, and we're gaining, but they still have numbers. So when they say things that might have an ideological basis, they probably do. When they say, "You can't compost meat," they mostly mean, "You shouldn't be eating meat anyway."

It's true that putting meat scraps in your compost will make it more likely that critters will dig for it, but hey, that's free stirring.

Blogger rycamor July 10, 2015 9:25 AM  

I've been composting for years, but until I read the book the one thing I had not yet done was David's "throw stuff on the ground" approach. Duh. Why go to all the trouble of making a compost heap over there when your plants are over here? So now just about all my organic waste except for meat and bones goes directly around my fruit trees and assorted other flora. Eggshells, coffee grounds, fruit and veggie leftovers, etc... just get thrown on the ground and then covered with a layer of leaves from a nearby pile. It is astounding how fast all that stuff just disappears into the earth, leaving it rich, black and full of worms.

Blogger David The Good from FloridaSurvivalGardening.com July 10, 2015 9:38 AM  

"When they say, "You can't compost meat," they mostly mean, "You shouldn't be eating meat anyway."

Yeah, that's likely true.

"I have started actively composting meat scraps. My Extension office neighbor officially said not to, but then told me over a beer it was ok as long as I bury it a bit. "

Meat is loaded with nutrition for the soil... the extension agents are usually total sissies.

Blogger rycamor July 10, 2015 9:48 AM  

Yup, I've found that as long as you bury meat under 6" of compost and another 6" of leaf mulch, the critters don't bother it. If it's a whole chicken carcass or bigger, then you just need to bury it a little deeper.

Anonymous You, Me, and Bud Dupree July 10, 2015 11:07 AM  

I usually comment as OASF.

"My neighbor, as payment for me tilling his garden, went and bought me a load of compost from the local compost facility. That crap was way to hot, and had tomato blight in it. Cut my yield in the garden by at least 50%."

Doesn't surprise me and I won't by commercial compost either. Like I said, I buy finely ground mulch from a mill just literally down the road plus whatever I get from my bin and it seems to do fine - but takes a little while to decompose. I live in a sparsely populated, watery, garden paradise so I don't deal with the blight and most of the rest of cesspool America stuff (not saying you live in a cesspool, just making a point).

"The stuff from walmart has so many weeds in it, you would be better buying the stuff they dig out of ditches in the rural areas."

We must be talking about different materials. I use this for my early spring/greenhouse starter plants and have never had a weed come up. Don't get me wrong, I hate Walmart too but the garden and lawn section isn't too awful bad. But once in the ground, I'd actually be more worried about lack of weeds and grass. The only way I get around that is to properly tarp - but it's a pain.

"Yes. The big problem with buying compost is just as you say. I've had thousands of dollars of plants destroyed due to contaminated manure. I make that point in the book. Within the last decade there have been herbicides approved with half-lives estimated at multiple years. Composting doesn't destroy them and they will utterly wreck your plants. It's usually not worth buying compost anymore... you're stuck making it. A lot of the "green" initiatives has also led to municipal waste (laden with heavy metals) being added to composting programs as "biosolids." I don't want that stuff in my food."

I read that comment in the book and I've never even bothered to buy commercial. If I use manure, I get it from a certified organic AMISH Dairy Farm (who also sell Raw Milk)and rototill it in. They charge most people and arm and a leg for it, if it's even available, but give it to me. I don't know why - maybe I don't want to know. I refer to the entire family as "Uncle Zebadiah" and perhaps this is Amish flattery.

Good, basic book btw. Using an old fridge or dish washer as a composting bin for the wigglers is a great idea... and draining off that goop that they secrete or whatever.

My radishes this year are doing very well... I guess everything is because of the rain and the good drainage of my property... but the pumpkins are phenomenal, soaking up the water like nobody's business.

Anonymous BGS July 10, 2015 11:24 AM  

"I had not yet done was David's "throw stuff on the ground" approach"

He must be as popular with the wives as I am, my str8 friends usually get me to bring up pre nups before they get married.

Blogger Gordon July 10, 2015 5:00 PM  

I tilled 800 pounds of horse barn sweepings into my garden this year, before I read David's warnings about pasture herbicides. I think I was lucky, as no problems have shown up. Instead, I have the Potatoes That Ate Minneapolis. They are on their second run of flowering, and have spread out to dwarf the nearby stuff. They are partying on horse crap to beat all. If anyone wants potato seeds, I will have lots and lots.

I will no longer purchase mulch. I used to buy the bagged shredded wood. David's book made me realize that I had plenty of mulch on my city lot, plus more being ignored by others nearby. It's not pretty colors like the commercial dyed stuff, but it's free and it works very well.

Blogger Gordon July 10, 2015 5:00 PM  

I tilled 800 pounds of horse barn sweepings into my garden this year, before I read David's warnings about pasture herbicides. I think I was lucky, as no problems have shown up. Instead, I have the Potatoes That Ate Minneapolis. They are on their second run of flowering, and have spread out to dwarf the nearby stuff. They are partying on horse crap to beat all. If anyone wants potato seeds, I will have lots and lots.

I will no longer purchase mulch. I used to buy the bagged shredded wood. David's book made me realize that I had plenty of mulch on my city lot, plus more being ignored by others nearby. It's not pretty colors like the commercial dyed stuff, but it's free and it works very well.

Anonymous James Parliament July 10, 2015 6:28 PM  

This fan is excited about any forthcoming books from DtG.

Glad you took a chance on this, Vox.

Anonymous JI July 10, 2015 11:45 PM  

Loved Compost Everything, we're following it in our own garden, and looking forward to David's next books. I hope they're both as enjoyable and enlightening as the first one.

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