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Saturday, July 04, 2015

The SJW review of books

And they wonder why we so blithely ignore their idiotic, ideologically-driven opinions. An SJW "reviews" RIDING THE RED HORSE:
Disappointing and uneven collection
By Elisabeth Carey on June 12, 2015
Format: Kindle Edition
Theodore Beale (Vox Day) is nominated for Best Editor, Long Form, and also Best Editor, Short Form.

This collection is included in the Hugo Voters packet in support of Theodore Beale's nomination for Best Editor, Short Form.

Unfortunately, it's a very uneven collection. It includes the very good The Hot Equations, by Ken Burnside, and the very disappointing Turncoat by Steve Rzasa. There is, early on, a casual endorsement of the probable "necessity" of genocide on the grounds that Those People aren't smart enough to modify their behavior. A point Beale's fans will have difficulty with is that such inflammatory language makes it less likely that readers will take in the point the author was attempting to make. A better editor would have caught it and told the author to dispense with pointless provocation and just make his point.

If this is the best evidence Beale has to offer, he has no place on the ballot.
I don't know about you, but I'm convinced. Then again, if one takes the opinion of actual mil-SF fans and science fiction readers into account, there can be very little doubt that if the Hugo Award for Best Editor, Short Form, was actually based on editorial merit, I would not only have a place on the ballot, but win the award on the basis of RIDING THE RED HORSE.
  • "The first great mil-SF anthology since Jerry Pournelle tapered off in the 90s."
  • "This is a great collection of short stories. I'm not a huge fan of military sci-fi but I very much enjoyed this collection."
  • "If you've been waiting for a new anthology in the spirit of Pournelle & Carr's THERE WILL BE WAR series, stop waiting and buy this. Includes new and classic combat SF, nonfiction articles on warfare and science, and good introductions by Vox Day."
  • "First science fiction anthology I've read and enjoyed since the Asimov days. Every SF story was fast moving and kept my interest including interest in the technology envisioned by the authors."
  • "As an anthology of futuristic military-scifi, interspersed with essays ranging from an introduction to the 4th Generation of War to the advancement of laser technology and how it will shape the wars of our future, Riding the Red Horse really hits the spot for both entertainment and intrigue."
Now, it is true, there are those who agreed with Elisabeth Carey and gave the anthology but a single star. Their opinions speak eloquently for themselves; these are the reviews in their entirety:
  • "What a piece of tripe. Exactly the kind of fiction that appeals to men who are insecure in their masculinity. My only regret is that one can't rate this book any less than one star."
  • "Bad"  
But what will be will be. It is of little import one way or the other. What is much more important is that Jerry Pournelle was sufficiently impressed with RIDING THE RED HORSE that he decided Castalia House was the right place to reprint and revive his excellent THERE WILL BE WAR anthology series. And as far as I'm concerned, that's the only award that matters and the only vote that counts.

I should mention that RIDING THE RED HORSE Vol. 2 is shaping up to be even more formidable than the original anthology. Many of the Vol. 1 contributors are back with a vengeance, and the new contributors include Martin van Creveld, Larry Correia, David Van Dyke, and Sarah Salviander.

Labels: ,

65 Comments:

Anonymous Steve July 04, 2015 8:14 AM  

Elisabeth Carey

Blogger VD July 04, 2015 8:20 AM  

Great. Now when everyone reads her review, all they're going to be able to see is: "Derp a derp, herp a derp a derp derp."

Anonymous Steve July 04, 2015 8:20 AM  

Lis Carey will never sleep with you, Vox.

Blogger Cataline Sergius July 04, 2015 8:21 AM  

Dizzy Lizzy seems to spend her every waking hour on politically driven reviews.

She actually has a bit of talent as a critic.

Which only serves to make her a scabrous, two dollar dockside whore for her ideology. Wear eye-condoms when reading her reviews. You'll regret it badly if you don't.

Blogger Cataline Sergius July 04, 2015 8:24 AM  

@Steve

TRIGGER WARNING MAN! You forgot to say, Trigger Warning!

Blogger VD July 04, 2015 8:26 AM  

Lis Carey will never sleep with you, Vox.

What a shame. Retarded 19th-century potato-eating peasant women are so hot.

Anonymous Jeff Wood July 04, 2015 8:27 AM  

Steve, the good Cataline Sergius is correct. Now I will have to eat another lunch.

Blogger Kryten 2X4B 523P July 04, 2015 8:31 AM  

I received Riding The Red Horse through the Hugo packet, which was great as when it came out I didnt have the funds to get it myself - so thank you for that.

Now, I'm not particularly a fan of all things military, but I thoroughly enjoyed RTRHt, and the mix of fiction and non-fiction made things really interesting. If there's a Vol. 2 in the works then that's on the list to get. I actually found myself reading it all the way through before I even touched the other Hugo stuff I had to get through.

I really suspect that those who 1 starred it either didnt read it, or are letting their politics get in the way of any objective review.

Anonymous Steve July 04, 2015 8:35 AM  

Vox, your cruelty is only surpassed by your evilness.

She's beautiful when she takes her glasses off.

Cataline, Jeff - sorry, chaps. I had to share. 9 times out of 10 when a wild SJW appears, it turns out they look like something rejected from Jim Henson's Creature Workshop.

Then I'm like.

Blogger Banjo July 04, 2015 8:35 AM  

I cannot remember a story discussing the "necessity" of genocide. Any thoughts which one she's talking about?

She put the word in quotation marks so I thought it was a direct quote, however a kindle search for that word turned up no hits.

And I refuse to click any of the image links. Much too early for that.

Blogger Kryten 2X4B 523P July 04, 2015 8:39 AM  

new rule?

SJWs are always less attractive than The Muppets.

Blogger Iowahine July 04, 2015 8:39 AM  

9. Steve: She's beautiful when she takes her glasses off.

Rather, when anyone looking at her takes off their glasses, or gouges out their eyes.

Blogger AmyJ July 04, 2015 9:02 AM  

She looks more like a Harlequin romance and Blue Bunny ice cream expert. There is "no place" for her opinions on milSF, nor can they be trusted.

Blogger VD July 04, 2015 9:03 AM  

I cannot remember a story discussing the "necessity" of genocide. Any thoughts which one she's talking about?

"Turncoat". See, a good editor would remove things that might offend or trigger people. The best fiction offends no one except straight white Christian men.

Blogger IM2L844 July 04, 2015 9:11 AM  

I cannot remember a story discussing the "necessity" of genocide. Any thoughts which one she's talking about?

"Turncoat". See, a good editor would remove things that might offend or trigger people. The best fiction offends no one except straight white Christian men.

Thanks. I was wondering about this as well. I would have thought retarded 19th-century potato-eating peasant women's biggest objections would be to the title of the book.

Blogger Jack Ward July 04, 2015 9:11 AM  

I would never judge a critic by personal appearance. I have read the Horse and her review. NOW, I can judge her and that judgement is not pretty.

Blogger grendel July 04, 2015 9:15 AM  

I'm really baffled by the hate for Turncoat. I loved it. I also don't remember the genocide section she mentions.

She's obviously a strong, powerful woman though. Going abroad in public with that face. So brave.

Blogger grendel July 04, 2015 9:20 AM  

It also shows a miserable lack of learning to act as though speculative fiction has never before tackled issues such as "Hey, wouldn't it be great if we just killed all the buggers so they can never attack us again?"

Blogger Mr.MantraMan July 04, 2015 9:24 AM  

The serious pinch faced look sealed the deal for me at least. I wonder if she is comfortable with c is white heterosexual males lusting for her?

Anonymous NorthernHamlet July 04, 2015 9:32 AM  

I'm not even rating her. My day is ruined.

Blogger Banjo July 04, 2015 9:38 AM  

Turncoat!?

So, her problem is that the antagonist, the BAD guy, in the story has embarked upon an evil plan.

I guess Mr. Rsaza could have had Alpha 7 decide to give out rainbows and puppies to his adversaries.

Might have impacted the whole point of the story though.

Blogger Mr.MantraMan July 04, 2015 9:38 AM  

Rihanna is not even taking white women's feminism seriously, nor are other black women. It seems her new video shows what she really thinks of white women and the opions of old women like Pinchy here

Blogger wrf3 July 04, 2015 9:42 AM  

Stickwick will be in RTRH2? That alone makes a sale.

Anonymous Whitey McWhite July 04, 2015 10:23 AM  

NO PLACE!

Blogger AmyJ July 04, 2015 10:29 AM  

She has a favorable reviews of YA paranormal romance novel and (spoiler alert) a poor review of John C. Wright's Transhuman. If this is the best she has to offer, she has no place as a SF reviewer.

Anonymous Holmwood July 04, 2015 10:29 AM  

She also trashed Rolf Nelson's The Stars Came Back, admitting not even having read it. With everyone pointing this out, she simply kept deflecting. Quite a piece of work this one.

Anonymous fish July 04, 2015 10:32 AM  

20. NorthernHamlet July 04, 2015 9:32 AM

I'm not even rating her. My day is ruined.


I don't know.....after seeing that I imagine everything else will look....better.

Blogger IM2L844 July 04, 2015 10:52 AM  

So, her problem is that the antagonist, the BAD guy, in the story has embarked upon an evil plan.

No. She clearly didn't read it. One of her SJW buddies gave her a one line synopsis and she went with it. They are all closet totalitarians who are uncomfortable letting the markets decide.

Anonymous Stickwick July 04, 2015 10:52 AM  

wrf3: Stickwick will be in RTRH2? That alone makes a sale.

Thanks, friend.

I think you'll like the story. It's about a strong, independent woman who joins the space marines, and against all expectations rises through the ranks until she commands her own ship. She's engaged to marry an officer in the royal space navy, a good dependable man, but after she's captured by the enemy, she falls for the leader of the evil space navy. She is forced to choose between the two men as she struggles with the demands of war. ...

Blogger macengr July 04, 2015 11:05 AM  

I've never understood how you can read an anthology and not find at least one story you thought was good. I just read all four (so far) There Will Be Wars and there were stories I liked, stories I didn't like, and stories that were in the middle - though they were all well written. It makes it obvious that she was using her political ideology to rate the book.

Blogger Russell (106) July 04, 2015 11:09 AM  

Stickwick, how fab! Is there a scene where she tries on different outfits with her bestie and her gay friend to decide best how to seduce both men?

If so, mark me down for a copy!

Blogger VD July 04, 2015 11:13 AM  

I think you'll like the story. It's about a strong, independent woman who joins the space marines, and against all expectations rises through the ranks until she commands her own ship. She's engaged to marry an officer in the royal space navy, a good dependable man, but after she's captured by the enemy, she falls for the leader of the evil space navy. She is forced to choose between the two men as she struggles with the demands of war....

I just can't what oh my.... I'll admit it. I laughed.

Anonymous Rolf July 04, 2015 11:16 AM  

You think she thought "Turncoat" was about the inevitability of genocide? I'd have thought it the one about the interview with the survivor who was recounting the story of why they fired on "non-combatants." Pretty easy to read into that story the troubles in the middle east, and how some of them simply don't see anyone as a non-combatant.

On the other hand, she seems to like YA paranormal romance, so she MUST be unbiased, right?

And, yes, Ms Carey reviewed The Stars Came Back recently too, but she didn't bother to read more than roughly 2% of it (based on all the basic factual things she got wrong in the review) before giving it one star. But she neglects to mention that little detail in the review, though she admits to it in the follow-up comments. In her review she says nothing about the style, only tears the story apart (but, remember, she didn't actually, you know, read it), and mentions nothing about style. In the comments on her review she finally says she tried, but didn't feel "drawn in," enough to by it. Hmmm... Wouldn't an honest review mention such a trivial little fact? But, no, honesty has no place in a review, only feelings. But, hey, she must be good: she's managed to turn her experience as a librarian into more than a hundred reviews, giving her a whopping... 32-millionth reviewer ranking?! Most.... impressive.

Blogger Jim July 04, 2015 11:24 AM  

She is forced to choose between the two men as she struggles with the demands of war.

Clearly she should marry both men.

And I find it problematic that she "commands" a ship. She should set up a collective where everyone has an equal part in making decisions and people understand that they are the ship's guests, not its rulers.

Anonymous Rolf July 04, 2015 11:37 AM  

34-- I started hearing Monty Python as I read that. Bravo, Stickwick, and excellent encore, Jim!

Blogger VD July 04, 2015 11:40 AM  

You know, Stickwick, it occurs to me that if you can simply throw three sample chapters together, that description should be sufficient to get a two-book deal from Tor Books. Or at least it would have been before PNH decided to put all their advance money into McRapey.

Anonymous IsMise July 04, 2015 11:51 AM  

If Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas had been able to reproduce ... Oh well, I have already committed a venal sin in her tiny mind by actually buying the book.

Blogger S1AL July 04, 2015 12:05 PM  

The relevant criticisms of the editing of RtRH are that there are a number of places where the wording could have used a good copy-editor. As far as overall editing, it was great.

Anonymous wEz July 04, 2015 12:13 PM  

I dunno....she looked alright (shrug). Maybe its just the beer in the photo talkin to me.

Anonymous James Parliament July 04, 2015 12:19 PM  

"I'm not even rating her. My day is ruined."


I imagine Viidad might rate her "5/10, would compost."

Anonymous The other robot July 04, 2015 12:26 PM  

As far as Turncoat goes I cannot remember any words that needed changing.

Anonymous Donn #0114 July 04, 2015 12:40 PM  

Stickwick - I think Ann MacCaffery already wrote that. Maybe under a pseudonym or with a co-author. Nothing like stealing from the best though.

Blogger bw July 04, 2015 1:38 PM  

Viidad might rate her "5/10, would compost."
+1

Blogger bw July 04, 2015 1:40 PM  

after she's captured by the enemy, she falls for the leader of the evil space navy

Sweet Hey-Soos

Been done. It's called "Patty Hearst" or Stockholm Syndrome.

Blogger bob k. mando July 04, 2015 1:41 PM  

29. Stickwick July 04, 2015 10:52 AM
I think you'll like the story. It's about a strong, independent woman who joins the space marines....



you are a very naughty girl. report to your husband for a spanking.




8. Kryten 2X4B 523P July 04, 2015 8:31 AM
I really suspect that those who 1 starred it either didnt read it, or are letting their politics get in the way of any objective review.



Leftists of all stripes under perform the expectations you would have for them based on aptitude tests ... because they're always busy deferring their judgment to idiotic cultural and political litmus tests.

Blogger Sad Puppy July 04, 2015 1:55 PM  

Maybe she is projecting her complaint about genocide.

Blogger Jim July 04, 2015 2:03 PM  

A point Beale's fans will have difficulty with is that such inflammatory language makes it less likely that readers will take in the point the author was attempting to make.

"Readers" looking for a reason to not read are of no value.

Anonymous Rolf July 04, 2015 2:35 PM  

46 - She likely projects her own personal biases into her reviews. She describes Helton Strom as having "failed at most things he's tried," even when the actual text says, quite clearly before page five, that piloting was the first thing he'd ever NOT been good at. In the further comments on her review she makes it clear she can't distinguish between failure and a highly talented person moving on looking for someplace where he can do some good and he's not simply an utterly replaceable peon (meaning she's got reading comprehension problems), or else she simply sees such people (smart, multi-talented, but not tied to the easily pigeonholed government job) as failures. From the totality of her comments, it's probable that it's the latter.

But maybe she's like the autistic child, focusing on all the wrong things - she gets hung up on how the flight simulator was damaged, when any fan of the genre would recognize the overall situation as humor, and the details of how exactly it happened are far more likely than not utterly unimportant, any more than what vender the bar-tender orders his booze from. If it isn't a plot-point that provides the necessary details, then those details are not important. How difficult is that to figure out? Oh, right. Consider the source.

Anonymous Stickwick July 04, 2015 2:52 PM  

Vox: I just can't what oh my.... I'll admit it. I laughed.

Well, you did suggest I could make some changes to appeal to a wider audience. But I'm questioning whether we want to go for wide appeal when inclusiveness is so much more important. This will, of course, drastically reduce sales, but the story will appeal to an incredibly tiny demographic of All the Right People.

So, here's how we'll do it. The two men fall in love, and when the woman finds out, she suddenly realizes that she identifies as a gay Rigelian man, so they all petition the space government to issue them a license for a polygamous gay space marriage. The space fundamentalists on the planet Bigotry VII oppose it, but then their planet falls into a black hole and they're never heard from again. The story is called "Fifty Shades of Rainbow."

Anonymous Ain July 04, 2015 3:41 PM  

I wonder how easy it would be to create a bot that churns out award-winning pink SF.

Blogger Dago July 04, 2015 4:15 PM  

Stickwick 's novel still sounds more legible than 50 shades of ghaaaaa.....

Blogger Karl July 04, 2015 5:52 PM  

Interesting choice of criticism. Here's two reviews from The Ethos Effect by L.E. Modesitt, published by Tor Books. Where a black ship captain with two gay fathers and a gay sister commits genocide against Earth with the help of mysterious aliens called Farrakhans (shut up pedants).

Positive Review - Cliched and pandering, but an intellectually challenging read June 18, 2009

Modesitt's work panders to all the secular, American-liberal stereotypes and viewpoints. In this book, ALL religious persons are murderous fanatics looking for a simplistic way to cope with reality. ALL dark-skinned persons are tolerant, open-minded, honest and industrious. ALL homosexuals are upper-class, loving, involved in storybook longterm relationships, utterly lacking any of the common hang-ups that afflict common folks. The Eco-tech Coalition (a Green society) is the closest thing to a utopian culture that the book can boast. ALL polities that stem from non-European cultures are portrayed sympathetically, generally as potential victims of blond, light skinned oppressors.

You might assume that I am exaggerating because I am conservative and religious (which are true), and therefore hate the book.

I am being strictly truthful regarding the author's almost cartoonish stereotypes; despite this and despite possessing a notably subdued tempo (for a science fiction novel, especially), I nonetheless truly enjoyed this book. It deeply engages the reader on serious ethical issues. One reader might conclude that the main character's actions were ethical; personally, my opinion is that the character merely adopted his enemies' views and methods. The author's writing could potentially support either view, which I am convinced was deliberate.

Negative Review - An Ethical Crime, April 3, 2004

Modesitt is at his best when he concentrates on action, and reins in his regrettable tendency to preachiness. Like many other readers, I liked THE PARAFAITH WAR, and other Modesitt books like ADIAMANTE. I found myself completely turned off by THE ETHOS EFFECT. The first third or so of the book is vintage Modesitt; the last two thirds are lost in a fog of murk as Modesitt commits attempted philosophy.

Didacticism is always a heavy load for any work of fiction; it's even worse when the message is so completely confused that you wonder what it's supposed to be. The book's protagonist commits mass murder--in what he sees as a good cause, of course. Normally, this should be viewed as the action of a depraved, mad, or wicked man. However, Modesitt doesn't seem to see his hero that way. Instead, gives us some mumblings of what appear to be an attempt at philosophical ethics, but these mumblings are of no help whatever in understanding the actions of the character within the story. The most cogent and concise review of this book would probably be: "Eh?"

Actually, I'm being charitable to Modesitt; if I understood what he was saying, this might be something much worse than a book of bad fiction. One could read this as a paean to mass murder; an exaltation of genocide; a rhapsody of ends justifying the means. (...)

But lo, I am uncharitable. As I said, I really can't understand what Modesitt is mumbling about in the Ethos Effect, so it's not an evil book--just a very bad one.

Anonymous Forrest Bishop VFM #0167 July 04, 2015 6:00 PM  

"There is, early on, a casual endorsement of the probable "necessity" of rape, pedophilia, anti-white racism, communism, and misandry on the grounds that Those People aren't smart enough to modify their behavior. A point Gerrold's & Scalzi's & GRRM's & On And On's fans will have difficulty with is that such inflammatory language makes it less likely that readers will take in the point the author was attempting to make. A better editor would have caught it and told the author to dispense with pointless provocation and just make his point." -the non-SJW, alternate-Universe Elizabeth Carey

What was the 3rd SJW Law again?

Anonymous Jourdan July 04, 2015 6:18 PM  

Regarding books whose plots revolve around the necessity of genocide and the moral questions posed by war at that level, the most obvious one that comes to mind is:

-- Ender's Game. (TOR SUPPORTS GENOCIDE)

--And the excellent Dark Wing series by Walter H. Hunt, which I highly recommend, especially if you love space navy fiction.

Blogger ray July 04, 2015 8:34 PM  

"What a piece of tripe. Exactly the kind of fiction that appeals to men who are insecure in their masculinity."


The skanks who used their emasculated nation and its 'laws' to steal masculinity from MEN and BOYS across the Western World, and award it unto themselves, now complain that males enjoying war-stories are 'insecure'?

American females cannot succeed at being female, they can't succeed at being male, the only thing they're good at is organizing to destroy fatherhood and masculinity, with the help of REAL insecure males. Oh, wait. They're good at projecting their insecurity, fear, and hatred onto (defenseless) boys and men, too.

Anonymous The other robot July 04, 2015 10:51 PM  

Speaking of bailins, Amazon is selling the Proxxon MiniMill for $462 while Proxxon are selling it for $400. Maybe you have the pay the freight.

Anonymous The other robot July 04, 2015 11:05 PM  

--And the excellent Dark Wing series by Walter H. Hunt, which I highly recommend, especially if you love space navy fiction.

Published by Tor, so I will not buy it.

Anonymous Eric Wilson (#0242) July 05, 2015 12:43 AM  

I think you'll like the story. It's about a strong, independent woman who joins the space marines, and against all expectations rises through the ranks until she commands her own ship. She's engaged to marry an officer in the royal space navy, a good dependable man, but after she's captured by the enemy, she falls for the leader of the evil space navy. She is forced to choose between the two men as she struggles with the demands of war. ...

This just seems like the perfect setup for some brilliant literature. Akin to The Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.

Blogger Eric Wilson July 05, 2015 12:44 AM  

So, here's how we'll do it. The two men fall in love, and when the woman finds out, she suddenly realizes that she identifies as a gay Rigelian man, so they all petition the space government to issue them a license for a polygamous gay space marriage. The space fundamentalists on the planet Bigotry VII oppose it, but then their planet falls into a black hole and they're never heard from again. The story is called "Fifty Shades of Rainbow."

I would pay lots of money to read this story written by a non-SJW.

Blogger bob k. mando July 05, 2015 1:47 AM  

59. Eric Wilson July 05, 2015 12:44 AM
I would pay lots of money to read this story written by a non-SJW.



well, you know, as a member of an oppressed and dis-privileged class, Stickwick probably could get away with writing this ....

and how could the SFWA *not* give her an award for it?

Blogger SciVo July 05, 2015 3:02 AM  

The two men fall in love, and when the woman finds out, she suddenly realizes that she identifies as a gay Rigelian man, so they all petition the space government to issue them a license for a polygamous gay space marriage. The space fundamentalists on the planet Bigotry VII oppose it, but then their planet falls into a black hole and they're never heard from again. The story is called "Fifty Shades of Rainbow."

Needs more rainbow. The royal officer turns out to be a transphobic stick-in-the-mud who can't get over the fact that one of his husbands has a vagina, so the trio gets a partial divorce and moves into an apartment with three suites and the evil leader in the middle. Then the evil leader comes out as bi, the Strong Independent Pre-op Transman Space Marine comes out as a pre-pre-op trans-transfemale transpony, and the royal officer comes out as a brony. She's able to make it work for the gay brony by putting a dildo/tail in her vagina (despite the anatomical weirdness of that), so they all move back in together and live happily ever after.

Blogger SciVo July 05, 2015 3:13 AM  

Wait, that's ridiculous. Of course they would live in a mansion, not an apartment.

I can't believe I almost broke the suspension of disbelief there. Bullet dodged!

Blogger MidKnight (#138) July 05, 2015 11:22 AM  

Reading this thread involves veering back and forth between slack-jawed amazement at a supposed librarian's inability to understand plain english and laughter at the comments here.

Given his accomplishments, Pournelle's agreement or approval carries far more weight with me in any context, especially a milSF anthology, than Carey's. But I'm a fan of his, and other's apparently consider him one of the "twelve rabid weasels" that SF would be better off without.

Blogger MidKnight (#138) July 05, 2015 1:22 PM  

Side note- her response to a claim that she's talking about Turncoat and mistaken is that the person leveling that accusation obviously only read the fiction pieces of the book.

Given that even Vox believed she was referring to turncoat, I now REALLY wonder where she dredged that up.

Blogger MidKnight (#138) July 05, 2015 11:01 PM  

Did some picking through. I think she means the editor's intro to Lind's essay:

"However, for anyone who prefers to live in a civilization that is not maintained by building mountains of skulls—presuming that’s possible, which is an open question at this point—we really ought to be concerned with meeting and defeating 4GW through means other than sheer genocide. I’d suggest, too, that the people with the greatest interest in our finding a way to defeat 4GW short of genocide should be, in fact, the practitioners of 4GW, the very people whose entire gene pools we may have to extinguish if we don’t find that solution.
 
But I don’t think they’re either objective enough, or bright enough, to figure that out, so it looks we’re going to have to do it on our own.”


This is 'a casual endorsement of the probable "necessity" of genocide on the grounds that Those People aren't smart enough to modify their behavior'?

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