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Sunday, September 13, 2015

There Will Be More

Dr. Jerry Pournelle has an important announcement:
Accepting submissions for a new volume of the There Will Be War series. Send with cover note to submission@therewillbewar.net. Stories should preferably be 20,000 words or less.  Poetry encouraged, but see the previous series; it needs to make sense. Hard science fiction mainly; urban fantasy with a military theme possibly acceptable, but mostly we want hard, realistic stories.  They need not be action adventure; good command decision stories encouraged. Space opera always considered.  Again see the previous nine volumes.

Nonexclusive anthology rights only are purchased.  Payment on acceptance is $100 advance against pro rata share of 50% of the revenues received from the publisher. Given the sales of the previous volumes we expect this to be a respectable payment. Original works will be considered, but author is welcome to sell it elsewhere; we purchase only nonexclusive anthology rights.

There will be a hardbound print edition, paperback if the sales indicate it, and eBook publication. Contributors will receive an author’s copy. Each contribution will have an introduction by the editor. The work will contain non-fiction essays by invited contributors: again see the previous volumes. 
There Will Be War has historically been a reprint anthology, so reprints are not only fine, they are preferred. But if you're a military science fiction writer, be sure to only send in your very best, as this will essentially be a "best of" the last two decades of military science fiction. If Vol. X can somehow reach what I consider to be the heights of Vol. II, I will be extremely pleased.

And if you haven't read There Will Be War Vol. II yet, go and get it now. Just do it. The entire series is more than merely good, it is important. But in my opinion, Volume II is the best SF anthology ever published. Seriously, it was hard to decide which of the stories most merited mention in the Amazon listing. Of particular note are “Superiority” by Arthur C. Clarke, “In the Name of the Father” by Edward P. Hughes, "'Caster" by Eric Vinicoff, “Cincinnatus” by Joel Rosenberg, "On the Shadow of a Phosphor Screen" by William Wu, and "Proud Legions", an essay on the Korean War by T.R. Fehrenbach.

I was talking to Dr. Pournelle recently, and one of the things I told him was that I was extremely surprised to learn, upon editing the re-released anthologies, how much influence There Will Be War had upon my intellectual development. If you have a teenage boy, this is a series that should be a part of his education.

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54 Comments:

Blogger ScuzzaMan September 13, 2015 3:29 PM  

Tangential, since "There WILL be War!": it appears Schengen is falling apart. Today Germany and the Czech Republic have imposed border controls on their borders with Austria.

These are the first dominos to fall... more will come.

Anonymous Wyrd September 13, 2015 3:33 PM  

OT: I feel the need to point out Phil Sandifer is the name of the totally weak and lame protagonist of MST3K episode 307 Daddy-O:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daddy-O

Anonymous The other robot September 13, 2015 3:37 PM  

I am looking forward to new volumes in the There Will Be War series.

However, Pournelle seemed to have an obsession with the Soviet Union in the first four that I have read, and I wonder whether or not that will morph into an obsession with some other entity on earth or not.

In that sense, I found Riding the Red Horse to be superior and the stories were uniformly good.

Anonymous Morgan September 13, 2015 3:45 PM  

T. R. Fehrenbach's "Proud Legions" is an excerpt from his THIS KIND OF WAR, his book on the Korean War. I exchanged some e-mails with Fehrenbach in the early 2000s. He was a Robert E. Howard fan among other things.

Anonymous Wyrd September 13, 2015 3:48 PM  

"He was a Robert E. Howard fan among other things."

Crom!

Blogger VD September 13, 2015 3:51 PM  

However, Pournelle seemed to have an obsession with the Soviet Union in the first four that I have read.

So did everyone, including the U.S. military, at the height of the Cold War. Pournelle has as good a claim as anyone on defeating the Soviet Union. He was one of the fathers of High Frontier and his Strategy of Technology, which Castalia will be re-releasing, was a major influence on the US officer corps.

Anonymous Steve, The Dark Ninja of Mockery September 13, 2015 4:00 PM  

Vol II is epic.

"Superiority" is Clarke on top form. You can tell he had fun writing that one.

"In The Name of The Father" is a wickedly clever and memorable post-apocalyptic tale. You think you know where it's going... and you're wonderfully wrong.

The job of sci-fi authors isn't to predict the future, but it's fun when they do. "On the Shadow of a Phosphor Screen" was written in the late 70's and yet gets so many things right about RTS and competitive gaming. (It also gets some things wrong, but that's part of the charm of zeerust).

"Proud Legions" is a brilliant essay, and more relevant than ever. It should be stapled to the forehead of every politician.

I didn't love "Cincinnatus". It's a story of deceit and cynicism, and maybe that's why it wasn't my cup of tea. It's about Israeli mercenaries in space, which sounds like a great setup for an action-packed Tom Kratman or Michael Z. Williamson type story, but it doesn't go that route.

Also, poetry isn't really my thing, but thankfully only takes up a couple of pages.

Overall, it's a great anthology stuffed with top notch stories.

Steve's rating: Five Mr. Worfs out of five.

Blogger VD September 13, 2015 4:02 PM  

I didn't love "Cincinnatus". It's a story of deceit and cynicism, and maybe that's why it wasn't my cup of tea.

That was my absolute favorite. Rosenberg's very best. Two intelligent, ruthless men attempting to get the better of the other... and on the same side. Very unusual, very, very good.

Blogger Rantor September 13, 2015 4:38 PM  

Looking forward, have a few original paperbacks somewhere...

Anonymous The Battle of the Mounds September 13, 2015 5:02 PM  

Crom! I never prayed to you before; I have no tongue for it. No one, not even you will remember if we were good men or bad; why we fought; or if we died. No, all that matters is today two stood against many. That's what's important! Valor pleases you, Crom; so grant me one request! Grant me revenge! And if you do not listen, then to Hell with you!

Anonymous The other robot September 13, 2015 5:04 PM  

Cincinatus was excellent for so many reasons.

I just did a search, and after weeding out Joel C Rosenberg, I see that there are a couple of other works of Rosenberg's that I might be interested in.

Blogger Cail Corishev September 13, 2015 5:22 PM  

So did everyone, including the U.S. military, at the height of the Cold War.

Yeah, that's what I was thinking; the Soviets were kind of an important topic. It's like the other day I was trying to explain to a couple teenage kids what it was like to grow up on War Games and The Day after Tomorrow. It was always kinda in the back of your mind that you could see mushroom clouds on the horizon one day. Then it just....didn't happen, and they have no concept of it.

Blogger Mr.MantraMan September 13, 2015 5:52 PM  

Yes the Cold War, Trotsky won, now Trotskyism must die.

Blogger Doom September 13, 2015 6:01 PM  

Too bad none of my stuff is truly hard sci-fi. The bear dream comes to mind, but... nah. Just doesn't work. Oh well. Not that my stuff is good enough. Then again, only one way to ever know.

Anonymous Steve, The Dark Ninja of Mockery September 13, 2015 6:15 PM  

Cail - It was always kinda in the back of your mind that you could see mushroom clouds on the horizon one day.

Yes. The threat of mutually assured destruction was an ever-present background noise, like rain pattering against a window.

It was front and centre in films like "Threads" and "When The Wind Blows". It was even in our pop songs: "Two Tribes" by Frankie Goes To Hollywood and "99 Luftballoons" by Nena are among the most famous. But "Forever Young" by Alphaville was the most eloquent:

Let's dance in style, let's dance for a while,
Heaven can wait we're only watching the skies.
Hoping for the best, but expecting the worst,
Are you gonna drop the bomb or not?


It was all very pessimistic. Partly because global thermonuclear war would have been a bummer, but partly also because the KGB was very, very good at psy-ops, and it suited their purposes to goad the Western Left into defeatism.

CND used to march under the slogan "Better Red Than Dead", while demanding that American nukes leave Western Europe and Britain and France unilaterally disarm. That would've been an open invitation to the Red Army to pour through the Fulda Gap, which was the whole point. CND and much of the rest of the British and European radical Left - the SJW's of their day - were being secretly funded and encouraged by Moscow. Why nobody was hanged for this after the truth came out, I do not know.

The "smart", "nuanced" people wanted us to roll over to the Soviets and hope they'd tickle our bellies. Ronald Reagan was portrayed as simultaneously a doddering old fool and a warmongering cowboy who'd get us all killed. Margaret Thatcher was a bootlicking lackey of Uncle Sam. Anti-communism was just another form of paranoid rightist bigotry. Why couldn't we learn not to paint the world in Manichean moral absolutes, but learn to appreciate its many splendiferous shades of grey, and yadda yadda yadda...

It looked like the Soviet system was as permanent and unyielding as the Berlin Wall. Jerry Pournelle and Larry Niven wrote the (rather excellent) "The Mote In God's Eye", which had the Soviets merging with the Yankee capitalists as part of its backstory. "2010" foresaw spaceships bearing the letters CCCP going to Io. IIRC, nobody predicted the Communist Bloc would fall apart, except some of the Austrian economists.

In some ways it's a shame. The KGB made for a better class of bad guy than do retarded Koran-and-kiddie fondlers.

Anonymous Dave September 13, 2015 6:16 PM  

Vox is this to be considered the ultimate TWBW? If so please supersize it and easy on the poetry please.

With both TWBW and RTRH forthcoming how would you classify their differences?

Blogger VD September 13, 2015 6:28 PM  

Vox is this to be considered the ultimate TWBW? If so please supersize it and easy on the poetry please.

Oh, there will be poetry. We're looking at 25 contributors compared to 19 in the past. The ultimate? Impossible to say. We'll see what we can find.

With both TWBW and RTRH forthcoming how would you classify their differences?

Easy. RTRH is all new. TWBW is all reprint, as it has always been.

Blogger Peter P. VFM #438 September 13, 2015 6:35 PM  

When is the omnibus coming out?

Blogger VD September 13, 2015 6:36 PM  

Early December is the idea.

Blogger Floyd Looney September 13, 2015 6:46 PM  

I'm too noob to even consider trying to submit anything.

Anonymous Mike M. September 13, 2015 7:20 PM  

I'll be happy to see "The Strategy of Technology" back. I suspect most of you are too young to appreciate just how much of an impact that book had in the 1975-1990 timeframe.

It was the manual for How To Beat The Soviet Union. We're talking Mahan-level repercussions.

Anonymous Dave September 13, 2015 7:20 PM  

Oh, there will be poetry.


I hate poetry!
Poetry looks like a demon rising.
I don’t want to do this.
Poetry sounds like nails on a chalkboard.
I still don’t want to do
this.
Poetry smells like skunk spray times

I still don’t want to do
this.
Poetry tastes like rotten eggs with
human brains.
I will never
do this again.
Poetry feels like being frozen by a
freeze ray.
Doesn’t everybody hate poetry?


Panajotis, a 2014 fifth-grader coerced author of poetry

Blogger Eric September 13, 2015 7:21 PM  

never read any of the TWBW series but it seems I will need to based on the reviews. So, I picked up Vol II.

Anonymous Dave September 13, 2015 7:25 PM  

Easy. RTRH is all new.

So what you're saying is This RTRH is all new.

Blogger automatthew September 13, 2015 7:34 PM  

So what you're saying is...

This joke is never going to get old.

Anonymous The other robot September 13, 2015 7:41 PM  

I heard someone pontificating that the Indians pronounce Gunga Din as Gunga Deen. I checked, and they do.

That makes the poem all the more interesting.

Anonymous The other robot September 13, 2015 7:48 PM  

It was the manual for How To Beat The Soviet Union. We're talking Mahan-level repercussions.

The US and the West generally has continued down the path of ever more complicated and high tech weapons while at the same time reducing the average intelligence of its populations.

I wonder how that turns out?

Blogger Ian McLeod September 13, 2015 8:21 PM  

Poetry, eh? Interesting.

Blogger Cataline Sergius September 13, 2015 8:37 PM  

Is the Riding the Red Horse series going to be rolled in to new There Will Be War series?

Or is that going to remain a separate title?

Blogger Cataline Sergius September 13, 2015 8:40 PM  

Third and ultimately hopeless question...Is there any hope of a Destines style anthology forthcoming?

Blogger bob k. mando September 13, 2015 8:40 PM  

12. Cail Corishev September 13, 2015 5:22 PM
It was always kinda in the back of your mind that you could see mushroom clouds on the horizon one day.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Skies

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmcNopvXedQ

Anonymous Sensei September 13, 2015 8:53 PM  

Yes! Something to tide us over until SoS

Blogger automatthew September 13, 2015 8:57 PM  

Or is that going to remain a separate title?

Vox has said they will remain separate, IIRC. Confidence level: 95%.

Anonymous Sixtusvith September 13, 2015 9:30 PM  

The US and the West generally has continued down the path of ever more complicated and high tech weapons while at the same time reducing the average intelligence of its populations.

I wonder how that turns out?


It turns out with the smart fraction able to wield military grade weapons disenfranchising and enserfing the retarded masses who can no longer defend themselves. Works for me: I can't be the only one who thought that Starship Troopers would mesh in a crazy awesome way with Downton Abbey.

Blogger maniacprovost September 13, 2015 9:47 PM  

I'm waiting for the alleged hard cover reprints.

I can't be the only one who thought that Starship Troopers would mesh in a crazy awesome way with Downton Abbey.

What.

Most aristocracies historically were the warrior class. Starship Troopers and its descendants simply envisage a large, democratic warrior aristocracy.

Anonymous Mike M. September 13, 2015 9:57 PM  

Ah, but Heinlein went to great lengths to make the point that Federal Service was not limited to the military. Any position that involved hard work and/or risk in the name of the Terran Federation would suffice.

Kindly note that in the novel, Rico (in the Army) and Carmen (in the Navy) survive. Carl, in a research position, was killed.

Blogger The Overgrown Hobbit September 13, 2015 11:14 PM  

Poetry isn't awful: Modern poetry is awful. It's a bit like the tropes: The Jews dunnit! The ladies, they make everything awful, etc. Except that it's the left-wing red-diaper baby Jews and the SJW women that mess up Judaism and womanhood for Jews, women and everyone else.

Have you forgotten?

He which hath no stomach to this fight--let him depart! His passport will be made.
And crowns for convey put into his purse.
We would not die in this man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us.
...
For he today that sheds his blood with us, shall be my brother.
Be he ne'er so vile, this day shall gentle his condition.
And gentlemen in England now abed shall think themselves accursed they were not here!
And hold their manhood cheap whilst any speaks
That fought with us upon St. Crispin's day.

Or take Kipling! You've heard his "Tommy" surely: (I had to look this one up)
http://www.poetryloverspage.com/poets/kipling/tommy.html

Or: Tell me not love, I am unkind that: from the nunnery
of thy chaste breast and quiet mind
to war and arms I flee
True a new mistress now I chase: the first foe in the field.
And with a greater love embrace: a sword, a horse, a shield.
Yet this inconstancy is such, as thou too shalt adore:
I could not love thee, dear, so much,
loved I not honor more.

Or Drummer Hodge (another one I forgot all the lines to) http://allpoetry.com/poem/8442911-Drummer-Hodge-by-Thomas-Hardy

The challenge for Vox Day as an editor, and for modern writers, educated in modern public schools, nursed on dirt and fed on ignorance and folly, is to find poetry free of po-mo crapulence.

I suspect it can be done, and wish him the very best in achieving it.

Blogger ScuzzaMan September 14, 2015 12:16 AM  

Stupid fat hobbit. Keep nasty poemses.

Give it to us raw and wriggling!

Blogger The Overgrown Hobbit September 14, 2015 1:03 AM  

@ #38 Bwaa-ha-ha!!! Be warned: I have learned off most of Tolkien's poetry by heart.

Blogger ScuzzaMan September 14, 2015 1:10 AM  

OT: from the Independent today, prepare for extreme cold.

"The slowdown in global warming is likely to end within two years as the Earth’s climate system undergoes a radical shift that could push temperatures to record highs this year and next, according to the Met Office.

The findings will demolish claims by climate sceptics that the slowdown in the rate of global warming over the past 17 years proves that scientists’ concerns are exaggerated."

Anonymous Shut up rabbit September 14, 2015 2:25 AM  

@40. ScuzzaMan
"...scientists’ concerns are exaggerated."

Exaggerated? They were completely fabricated. All their doomsday prophecies came straight out of biased mathematical models backed up by doom mongering shills and no real data.

I'm convinced this was a test to see how far the "I fucking love science!" crowd could be made to believe lies despite the evidence of their own eye (its hard to cover up snowstorms while repeating, "Warmest winter on record!" Over and over again.). They'll take quite a lot it appears.

A triumph of media marketing and the belief in "Experts" over the screamingly bloody obvious.

Anonymous VD September 14, 2015 3:54 AM  

Is the Riding the Red Horse series going to be rolled in to new There Will Be War series?

No.

Blogger Floyd Looney September 14, 2015 7:18 AM  

@36 slavery to government is slavery to government, even if it is called Federal Service.

Anonymous Patrick September 14, 2015 8:45 AM  

Would you consider a approx. 1700 word non-fiction on the influnce of Starship troopers on today's American military?

Blogger maniacprovost September 14, 2015 9:55 AM  

Will this be a trade paperback?

Anonymous Dave September 14, 2015 10:18 AM  

Will this be a trade paperback?

No, wait...yes, no.

Blogger VD September 14, 2015 11:36 AM  

Would you consider a approx. 1700 word non-fiction on the influnce of Starship troopers on today's American military?

Highly unlikely. It's not up to me, it's up to Dr. Pournelle, and considering the quality of the contributors he is getting, that doesn't sound competitive.

Will this be a trade paperback?

No, hardcover.

Blogger SirHamster (#201) September 14, 2015 1:34 PM  

@43
"slavery to government is slavery to government, even if it is called Federal Service."

Do you deny the right of individuals to submit themselves to service? Or do you not like that the franchise is earned?

IIRC, Rico comes from a well off family, indicating wealth can be had and protected without Federal Service.

Blogger ScuzzaMan September 14, 2015 2:05 PM  

@Shut up rabbit:

Indeed. Hence my opening warning; **prepare for cold**

The last time the Met Office predicted warm winters and the end of snow forever, Britain was pounded with three of the coldest shittiest killingest snowy winters in living memory.

The Met Office says it is going to get warmer = Winter Is Coming!!!

Prepare for cold, britons.

Blogger ScuzzaMan September 14, 2015 2:06 PM  

AKA, The Gore Effect

OpenID malcolmthecynic September 14, 2015 2:29 PM  

Can I send in something by an old public domain author? Obviously I won't take credit for it, but the author is VERY famous in certain circles and almost unknown in others, and he should get more attention. The poem I'm thinking of is about a particular battle.

To clarify, I'm not taking credit for it, just wondering if I can send it in and see if you'll be interested in publishing it.

Blogger buwaya September 14, 2015 3:14 PM  

I am a bit confused, I apologize in advance for a stupid question.
Shall the new volume of Pournelle's TWBW be a Castalia book ?
Its a real coup if so.

Blogger VD September 14, 2015 3:15 PM  

Can I send in something by an old public domain author?

No.

Shall the new volume of Pournelle's TWBW be a Castalia book?

Yes.

Blogger Technomad September 18, 2015 10:29 PM  

Just finished and submitted a story to them. Wish me luck!

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