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Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Dance rape

A mother is horrified that her daughter might be forced to dance with a lower-status boy at a Valentine's Day party:
A Utah mother is concerned after finding out her child couldn’t reject a classmate’s invitation to dance at a Valentine’s Day school party because it would be against school rules.

Natalie Richard, whose daughter is in sixth grade at Kanesville Elementary School in Weber County, told Fox 13 Salt Lake City that she was shocked to hear her child tell her she couldn’t tell a fellow student “no” if he asked her to dance at the upcoming event.

Confused, Richard told her daughter that she was “misunderstanding” the situation, because “that’s not how it is.”

The daughter’s teacher, however, confirmed to Richard that, in fact, her daughter “has to say yes” and “has to accept” such a proposal.

Still concerned, Richard took her plight to the school principal — who “basically just said they’ve had this dance set up this way for a long time and they’ve never had any concern before.”
Of course the school has to set rules like this for children. Otherwise, all the kids will all just stand around and watch as the three most popular boys and their girlfriends dance. It's tough enough for a junior high boy to publicly ask a girl to dance even if she has to say yes. Throw in the possibility of actual rejection - as opposed to sighs, rolled eyes, and snide comments - and ain't nobody dancing.

The alternative, of course, is the highly efficient way our fifth-grade dance teacher did it. Line up the boys in one row, the girls in another, both by height. No cutting or exchanging. Congratulations, you have a partner. Try not to step on her toes.

67 comments:

  1. I felt kind of ripped off compared to previous generations. In my dad's high school they actually taught the kids how to dance. Part of the reason those fifth graders don't have any confidence is they have no flippin' idea what they're doing.

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  2. Bob Loblaw wrote:I felt kind of ripped off compared to previous generations. In my dad's high school they actually taught the kids how to dance. Part of the reason those fifth graders don't have any confidence is they have no flippin' idea what they're doing.

    I hear you. South Africans (well us Afrikaners at least) still have a tradition of dancing the quickstep, two-step, waltz and something we call Sokkie, which is basically just a cha-cha for people who don't know what a cha-cha is. But I never was taught how to dance any of those. And it cascades into other areas of your life too. And the older you get, the harder it is to break out of that vicious cycle of not knowing how to do something and not having anyone willing to teach you. It's like an entire generation of parents thought that we'd just magically absorb their awesomeness without them having to put in any effort.

    It only changed when I heard about ballroom dancing classes in the next town over and I took enough classes to get a solid grip on the more popular dances like the waltz, foxtrot, two-step, etc. I was also glad to learn that the cha-cha could be danced on just about any techno song from the 90's, and many of the "slow songs" had a waltz rhythm. That helped tremendously. I was lucky though.

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  3. They made us do square dancing and line dancing, which never came up in my life again. I wish we could have learned some actually useful formal dances. For instance, I live near a Bohemian area, with its own Polka radio stations and everything. I could have put polka skills to use, but alas have none.

    We were paired off by fiat, by the way, and I don't remember any problems whatsoever.

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  4. We do not socialize youth to enter the adult world with adult competencies. It used to be that there were community dances and events for adults and youth together. Youth could see what proper social interaction was supposed to look like.

    Then we sequestered them into spaces exclusively for youth and they lost the opportunity to learn from normal adult socialization.

    Of course, it was also normal to instruct youth in actual dance steps for square dances, cotillions, debutante balls, etc. But our society jettisoned that kind of training at some point.

    At the high school and middle school dances I went to in growing up in AZ, it was more of a bump and grind affair with very little actual dancing going on. While the youth enjoyed this aspect it was not the kind of thing preparing them to do more than fornicate.

    If we want youth to succeed we have to create opportunities for them to practice the pro-social behavior we know they need and we have to teach them the skills in advance of opportunities for putting them into practice.

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  5. If she has a problem with the school rules, maybe her child shouldn't be attending the dance. Problem solved.

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  6. I do sympathize with the mother in this case based on an extrapolation of this practice: if the students in the school in question are not allowed to refuse to dance with a given partner because the school district wants to keep the whole thing from turning into three popular guys and their girlfriends being the only ones on the dance floor, how long is it before boys and girls at public schools are forced to dance with "tranny" classmates for "reasons?"

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  7. We had dancing classes in primary school (from 5 to 10 years old) and the teachers just randomly assigned people. It seemed to work and stood us in good stead later in life.

    I might be a psychopath, but it's not because of that.

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  8. Well of course the girls are being "forced" to go to the party and "forced" to participate in the dance, they're half raped already, so let's do away with all that.

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  9. What, no consent laws in place? Someone should tell the principle abot "no means no", and watch the cognitive dissonance kick in.

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  10. "You mine if we dance wiff yo dates?"

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  11. I agree that part of the problem is they don't teach any formal dances. Most guys aren't comfortable with bouncing around all over the place but will dance if they know the steps and what they are supposed to be doing.

    That being said, I'm wary of simply saying you have to dance with anyone who asks. Pairing kids off at random for a few dances and then letting them pick and choose after that would be better. Otherwise, as someone said, it's going to be forced dancing based on SJW whims. (I say this as someone who had to suffer a girl grabbing the closest guy near her so I couldn't ask her to dance.)

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  12. Bring back dance cards.

    And some manners, sheesh! And graciousness. You don’t have to marry your dance partner.

    Humility and kindness mean nothing anymore.

    My grandfather taught me to Polka. At my aunts wedding, over 25 years ago, a boy three years younger than me, and almost a foot shorter, asked me to dance. I did. To this day we’re friends. It’s not always about the romantic connection. Sometimes you’re strengthening social bonds.

    But that’s the real problem. Social bonds. They’re not wanted. In a society where we’re all equal and customs don’t matter, I suppose that’s considered positive. The superficial social bonds sought by the Left are pieces of flair compared to the deeply felt bonding of like peoples to one another.

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  13. The parent says it "sends a bad message to girls that girls have to say 'yes'; sends a bad message to boys that girls can't say 'no.'"

    I realize they'd be on the girl's side, but the only reason this is a news story is because it's from the girl's perspective. If it were about a boy, no one would care. Or they'd only care enough to laugh, tell him to get over it, or possibly throw him a beating.

    Traditionally, of course, the boys proposition girls. But is that still how it's done? I don't know. I would be surprised if boys aren't pressured to dance with girls. I was, and that wasn't forever ago.

    Anyway, we have this annoying tradition of always looking at pressured courtship or sex or marriage exclusively from the girl's perspective. As if, for instance, arranged marriages were always in the male's favor. What, none of them ever got the wrong end of the deal? None of them would turned it down if they had the choice? It was always the man exploiting the unwilling maiden, never the other way 'round?

    But I digress. I realize this is all because women are more valuable than men. But they're not infinitely more valuable. Not valuable enough for me to care about them being forced to dance with a creep.

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  14. Leftists have done a fine job of 'making antiquated' the many American traditions that would have otherwise been in place to make this situation benign.

    Insofar as Dance is sublimated sex, what we see here is what is likely a good mother doing the instinctually right thing.

    One hopes Dad's around.

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  15. Leftists have done a fine job of 'making antiquated' the many American traditions that would have otherwise been in place to make this situation benign.

    Insofar as Dance is sublimated sex, what we see here is what is likely a good mother doing the instinctually right thing.

    One hopes Dad's around.

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  16. @16-Dancing as sublimated sex is overly reductive. It's so much more than that, and less.

    Ballet, for instance, grew partly out of the way men and women comported themselves at court. How they stood, how they walked, how they posed. All to demonstrate their grace and stature, to secure their place in the order, and so forth, in front of everyone.

    Of course, there were males and females, together both, but it wasn't all about "Let me get through this and find the quickest possible route into her bodice." It was broadly social, not merely sexual.

    Now, junior high dances aren't High Culture. They barely have any culture at all. But they're also never just about sex. Kids will have those sex-type feelings, but you remember what school was like. It wasn't wall-to-wall boy-girl stuff, even if dances brought that into focus.

    It was like a royal court, in a sense. With everyone always on display and jockeying for position in the hierarchy. Dances could be more about that, too, if they were more orderly.

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  17. Chris Lutz wrote:I'm wary of simply saying you have to dance with anyone who asks.
    This is the standard rule from Norman society at least. Of course, in an aristocratic society, there would only be one social class at such an event.

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  18. For instance, I live near a Bohemian area, with its own Polka radio stations and everything. I could have put polka skills to use, but alas have none.

    You're doing it wrong. After several beers, anyone can polka. Kind of. At least it's fun to watch the dance floor wrecks.

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  19. "But that’s the real problem. Social bonds. They’re not wanted. In a society where we’re all equal and customs don’t matter, I suppose that’s considered positive. The superficial social bonds sought by the Left are pieces of flair compared to the deeply felt bonding of like peoples to one another."

    This is so true, and it has been all but extinguished in the US and A. Diversity Uber alles has killed all the little polities that bonded society. I lived in France many years ago and had a French girlfriend and observed all the rules of polite society, which, at the time I thought were very strict. But now I'm married to a Hungarian woman. In Hungary, these social rules are actually very strict and on reflection, I now see how they were dying in France at the time I was there. I have no desire to go back to Francistan, but I'm curious how far the social rules have degraded since I was there last, 20 years ago.

    The little things unique to one's own culture bond that culture together. Diversity is the death of politeness and the death of culture.

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  20. There's no mention of couples dancing in the Bible.

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  21. Koanic wrote:There's no mention of couples dancing in the Bible.

    There's also no mention of internet porn or freedom of speech.

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  22. Sherwood family wrote:We do not socialize youth to enter the adult world with adult competencies. It used to be that there were community dances and events for adults and youth together. Youth could see what proper social interaction was supposed to look like.

    This is such a good point. But we're so far away from that society/country that it may as well be sci fi at this point. It just illustrates the tragedy that has been wrought.

    That said, I'd love to learn that there are little pockets of that kind of society that still survive, but I'm not holding my breath.

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  23. This brings up a related question:
    Are the boys also required to ask the unpopular/unattractive girls to dance?

    One would think "yes", or they're just going to end up with the same type of limited participation.

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  24. In any case, it could be a lot worse. Sometimes dances do get out of hand: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xG3yGdQYwqg

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  25. Freedom of association is so 18th Century. We're beyond that now.

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  26. James Dixon wrote:If she has a problem with the school rules, maybe her child shouldn't be attending the dance. Problem solved.

    If mama has a problem with the school rules, her child definitely shouldn't be attending the school. Comment fixed.

    Home school or die.

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  27. I wonder what happens when a slender gay youth wants to dance with the biggest jock in his class.

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  28. In our gym class on dance there were 20 guys and 8 or so girls. I got paired up with the hottest girl in our school and danced the foxtrot. Man I felt like a lottery winner. While other guys were forced to dance with other guys (which usually devolved into mock kneeing each other in the groin and other such skullduggery), I got to wrap my arms around a dusky eyed voluptuous Italian goddess. I'm not sure if I ever learned the actual dance, but dang that was the high water mark of my life up to that point, age 16. Memories... and good ones.

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  29. Ps Anno Ruse, it’s totally discriminatory that the Ice Dancing and Pairs Figure skating are traditionally heterosexual in their scope, form, judgment criteria, and presentation.

    If a man can be openly homo and “marry” his coque du jour, why, then, can he not ice dance or synchronize his triple axle with another man?

    Subliminally, that all know it’s all about sexual dynamics and seduction/reproduction.

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  30. A bit OT. Apparently forensic pathology is racisss. A reconstruction of Nefertiti failed to come up black.

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  31. Ah, yeah our children have become captives. Can't say we weren't warned of the consequences of forsaking God.

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  32. Must be an Utah Mormon mother terrified her daughter was being forced to go to a dance with one of my 6 white Catholic grandsons...
    The way they get treated in Salt Lake City, you'd think they were rapist Somalians.
    My previous experiences here in the South with the small amount of Mormons has always been lovely.
    Then...my upper middle class devoutly Catholic grandkids moved to SLC.
    It's been continuous moving and school changing for 8 yrs.
    My feelings toward the Mormons has changed DRAMATICALLY.

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  33. > There's also no mention of internet porn or freedom of speech.

    Yes, those two things are also obviously un-Biblical.

    It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that the First Amendment contradicts the First Commandment.

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  34. I went totplenty of dancesdatd that age. Plenty of dancing got done without rules like this.

    Don't dancedbecause you're scared of rejection?

    Oh well. Sounds like a great life lesson. Success favors the bold. Take risks or get left behind.

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  35. Nate apparently your typos are a mode of flu transmission, now I've got it. It's evovling.

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  36. @10 Stilicho
    "You mine if we dance wiff yo dates?"
    --

    haha i loved that scene :P

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  37. Must be an Utah Mormon mother terrified her daughter was being forced to go to a dance with one of my 6 white Catholic grandsons...

    Nope. She was probably concerned about her daughter being forced to accept diversity on the dance floor if you know what I mean.

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  38. I often get pressured by girls to dance with them at the office Christmas party!

    Career limiting move to say no.





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  39. While the boy probably feels like he lucked out regarding the schools rule, what should he do in the event the girl dances like Elaine Benes?

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  40. @29 Anno Ruse
    I wonder what happens when a slender gay youth wants to dance with the biggest jock in his class.
    ---

    Is that how Barry Sotero and Reggie Love first met ? How cute.

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  41. @34 Zeroh Tollrants
    Then...my upper middle class devoutly Catholic grandkids moved to SLC.
    ---

    They invaded the mormon homelands - they have to go back.

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  42. Depends on the type of dancing - non-touching, or loosely-touching (no groin action) - OK.

    However, if the dancing is of the Vertical Sex type - NO.

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  43. If you are a clumsy person attempting to learn martial arts, learning some dancing will do wonders for your footwork.

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  44. I understand this is how actual dances by adults used to work too. The only acceptable reasons to say No to dancing with someone were 1. You're tired or 2. You don't know the dance. So if you said No to someone, you could not dance with anyone that dance.

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  45. Square dancing was taught in middle school as late as 2000

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  46. Creepy AF. It's not like this is a dance class, it's a Valentine's Day dance. Might get your feelings hurt because you get rejected? It's better to learn to cope with that sooner rather than later.

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  47. Zeroh Tollrants wrote:Must be an Utah Mormon mother terrified her daughter was being forced to go to a dance with one of my 6 white Catholic grandsons...

    The way they get treated in Salt Lake City, you'd think they were rapist Somalians.


    I have heard a few times how SLC Mormons, who are a minority in liberal SLC, are not welcoming of non-Mormons. No offense, Zeroh, but I wish that were true in the rest of the state.



    Then...my upper middle class devoutly Catholic grandkids moved to SLC.



    The Catholics in SLC have a history of antagonizing the Mormons. I'm sure your grandkids are great, but diversity, proximity, and all that.

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  48. Supreme Dark Lord,
    Is it possible to bring back formal dances? How can it be done with success? Certainly SJWs will want to spoil it.
    Thanks, a soon to be first dad.

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  49. PragmaticTroll wrote:Supreme Dark Lord,

    Is it possible to bring back formal dances? How can it be done with success? Certainly SJWs will want to spoil it.

    Thanks, a soon to be first dad.


    You didn't ask me, but I have a little experience with this. In Utah, BYU hosts Dance Sport each year and has a number of competing ballroom dance teams or groups. The team members teach intro and intermediate ballroom dance classes that are 0.5 credit hours. Part of the class is attending formal ballroom dances. No dance card, but it's close.

    Also, growing up homeschooled, I went to a few Civil War balls. The girls loved it cause fancy dresses and all that. The guys liked it causes sabers and rifles. For a guy, you can get away with gray slacks (not blue, obviously), a white button down shirt, and a vest. Also, they had dance instruction before it all started.

    Good luck.

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  50. I wonder if Vox and the rest of the still-bitter-decades-later dateless Omegas in this comment section would still be disparaging this woman’s concern for her daughter being subjected to compulsory fraternization if the given reason was that there was a twice-held-back migrant in attendance who intended to use the rule to pull any girl he can get his hands on against himself?

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    1. @Groffin-Different issue, different answer. "Compulsory fraternization" is not a big deal when all it consists of is kiddie dancing for one song or less. It's not much different from being forcibly paired up for a school project or discission group. Public school will get you to fraternize against your will. That's part of the deal.

      Presumably, schools have rules for proper behavior at dances. There's no mention of dance partners all grindin' up on the girl in the article. If chaperones weren't putting a stop to it, or didn't believe her when she brought it up, the parents would have a point. But then it wouldn't be different than any of the billions of disciplinary shortfalls endemic to public school.

      Furthermore, if the girl is going to be subject to the bodily whims of a bunch of greasy Others, either she can rely on the discipline of authority figures, which of course she can't, or she can skip the dances. Then she can get out of the district or home school.

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  51. Personally I wouldn’t want my girls dancing with nonwhites. But this does raise an issue. School dances are about getting to know one another, and are presumably based on certain customs that certain people understand.

    Change the people, change the rules. And expectations.

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  52. I'm trying to remember if I was ever rejected when asking for a dance in junior high or high school. I can't recall any rejections from the ladies. Must've just been that good looking ;)

    I do remember being shot down when asking out girlfriends, even had one dump me. Such is life and it makes you stronger.

    Friggin' snowflakes.

    Bob Loblaw wrote:I felt kind of ripped off compared to previous generations. In my dad's high school they actually taught the kids how to dance. Part of the reason those fifth graders don't have any confidence is they have no flippin' idea what they're doing.

    We weren't taught anything in grade school or high school re: dancing except square dancing in grade school. I attended cotillion in fifth grade and learned the foxtrot, swing, cha-cha, and waltz but never used it at any dances. I didn't learn any CW dancing until I was in Texas (two step and country waltz). That's been my go to, ever since. Hard to believe rap used to "be acceptable" to dance to. *spits*

    Harambe wrote:Bob Loblaw wrote:I felt kind of ripped off compared to previous generations. In my dad's high school they actually taught the kids how to dance. Part of the reason those fifth graders don't have any confidence is they have no flippin' idea what they're doing.

    I hear you. South Africans (well us Afrikaners at least) still have a tradition of dancing the quickstep, two-step, waltz and something we call Sokkie, which is basically just a cha-cha for people who don't know what a cha-cha is. But I never was taught how to dance any of those. And it cascades into other areas of your life too. And the older you get, the harder it is to break out of that vicious cycle of not knowing how to do something and not having anyone willing to teach you. It's like an entire generation of parents thought that we'd just magically absorb their awesomeness without them having to put in any effort.

    It only changed when I heard about ballroom dancing classes in the next town over and I took enough classes to get a solid grip on the more popular dances like the waltz, foxtrot, two-step, etc. I was also glad to learn that the cha-cha could be danced on just about any techno song from the 90's, and many of the "slow songs" had a waltz rhythm. That helped tremendously. I was lucky though.


    @2 At least you all keep your traditions in tact. One wonders how many white people here Stateside know how to dance besides grinding to rap. Cha-cha to electronic? Dang, I'll try that the next time I'm at UMF or EDC, provided the gf is with me of course.

    tublecane wrote:They made us do square dancing and line dancing, which never came up in my life again. I wish we could have learned some actually useful formal dances. For instance, I live near a Bohemian area, with its own Polka radio stations and everything. I could have put polka skills to use, but alas have none.

    We were paired off by fiat, by the way, and I don't remember any problems whatsoever.


    @3 It's crazy. This one chick I knew when I was in grad school in Texas was from a Czech descended family (they still each kolaches and dance polka despite having been Stateside since the 1830s) that danced polka. It seems to be worth learning if you can.

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  53. Sherwood family wrote:We do not socialize youth to enter the adult world with adult competencies. It used to be that there were community dances and events for adults and youth together. Youth could see what proper social interaction was supposed to look like.

    Then we sequestered them into spaces exclusively for youth and they lost the opportunity to learn from normal adult socialization.

    Of course, it was also normal to instruct youth in actual dance steps for square dances, cotillions, debutante balls, etc. But our society jettisoned that kind of training at some point.



    At the high school and middle school dances I went to in growing up in AZ, it was more of a bump and grind affair with very little actual dancing going on. While the youth enjoyed this aspect it was not the kind of thing preparing them to do more than fornicate.

    If we want youth to succeed we have to create opportunities for them to practice the pro-social behavior we know they need and we have to teach them the skills in advance of opportunities for putting them into practice.


    @4 Well now that you're Stateside for a bit you can see the rotting of what's left of dance. I doubt outside of Cairo that Egypt did much dancing, but what did you see in Egypt and Uzbekistan? Also, re: tranny crap, if my (future) children were "forced" to that, I'd make sure that they were sick the day of said dance.

    Stilicho wrote:"You mine if we dance wiff yo dates?"

    @10 LOL!!!!!!!!!! I watched that last night with my dad. That is, next to "primitive cultures", arguably the best line in the movie!

    Agreed with OGRE: you win the thread.

    Harambe wrote:Koanic wrote:There's no mention of couples dancing in the Bible.

    There's also no mention of internet porn or freedom of speech.


    @24 BURN!!!!!!!!

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  54. Craig Cousins wrote:This brings up a related question:

    Are the boys also required to ask the unpopular/unattractive girls to dance?

    One would think "yes", or they're just going to end up with the same type of limited participation.


    @26 I had a fugly girl in grade school try to dance next to me at a group dance in junior high. Yeah, extricated myself from that situation. We were warned years ago when she transferred to our school if we made light of her physical deformity all hell would be brought down on us. That was the closest to "being forced to ask the unpopular/unattractive girls to dance" that happened to us.

    Zeroh Tollrants wrote:Must be an Utah Mormon mother terrified her daughter was being forced to go to a dance with one of my 6 white Catholic grandsons...

    The way they get treated in Salt Lake City, you'd think they were rapist Somalians.

    My previous experiences here in the South with the small amount of Mormons has always been lovely.

    Then...my upper middle class devoutly Catholic grandkids moved to SLC.

    It's been continuous moving and school changing for 8 yrs.

    My feelings toward the Mormons has changed DRAMATICALLY.


    @35 In other news, water is wet.

    Were-Puppy wrote:@34 Zeroh Tollrants

    Then...my upper middle class devoutly Catholic grandkids moved to SLC.

    ---

    They invaded the mormon homelands - they have to go back.


    @44 Ah, a good old thread that devolves into Christian denomination fight! I LOOOOOVE IT! BRING IT! jk on the bring in part.

    peppermint88 wrote:Square dancing was taught in middle school as late as 2000

    @48 I graduated grade school in '01. Can confirm.

    PragmaticTroll wrote:Supreme Dark Lord,

    Is it possible to bring back formal dances? How can it be done with success? Certainly SJWs will want to spoil it.

    Thanks, a soon to be first dad.


    @51 Try to petition the pastor at your local church (if Christian) or rabbi at the synagogue (if Jewish). If you're in Indy, North Deanery of the Archdiocese has dances for Catholic schools during the school year (or at least they did when I was in grade school).

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  55. how DARE a thot refuse my offer of a dance?

    https://i.imgur.com/P8BHKKV.gifv

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  56. I have four daughters and I would allow any of them to attend a dance where they could not refuse to dance. Yes, that means Negroes and Mexicans and Muslims and Hindus. No, I would not permit it and none of them would have liked it either. Telling girls they must submit to whoever picks them is a very bad idea. It makes them feel they are without dignity.

    If this were a dancing class it would be another matter, but this is a Valentines Day event. Sixth grade girls (11 to 12 years) should certainly have the ability to refuse.

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    1. @DonReynolds-"It makes them feel they are without dignity"

      That's a fake problem. Do you imagine girls had no dignity in the days of dance cards? Poppycock. They had more.

      If the real problem is that you fear them mixing with the wrong sort of people, that's something else. Being among your own class and kind is important. But in that casr, your daughters maybe not only shouldn't be going to dances, but shouldn't be at the schools they're at, or in public school at all.

      Delete
  57. Tublecane's catawampus sperg-o-rama.

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  58. AaMcavoy wrote:PragmaticTroll wrote:Supreme Dark Lord,

    Is it possible to bring back formal dances? How can it be done with success? Certainly SJWs will want to spoil it.

    Thanks, a soon to be first dad.


    You didn't ask me, but I have a little experience with this. In Utah, BYU hosts Dance Sport each year and has a number of competing ballroom dance teams or groups. The team members teach intro and intermediate ballroom dance classes that are 0.5 credit hours. Part of the class is attending formal ballroom dances. No dance card, but it's close.

    Also, growing up homeschooled, I went to a few Civil War balls. The girls loved it cause fancy dresses and all that. The guys liked it causes sabers and rifles. For a guy, you can get away with gray slacks (not blue, obviously), a white button down shirt, and a vest. Also, they had dance instruction before it all started.

    Good luck.


    I appreciate the feedback. There are some great lessons from the film "Meet Me in St. Louis" about proper etiquette involving dances and courting. I highly recommend it.

    What are some good tactics knowing that if a formal dance had rules like: No trannies. No modern music. Appropriate clothing etc. What does applying effective anti-SJW tactics look like in practice for dances?

    Let's Make Dances Great Again!

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  59. Another symptom of the transition from a high trust society to a low trust society.

    Or a mono-ethnic society to a diverse society. Same thing.

    In a high trust society, forced dancing is accepted and normal. In a low trust society, it is not accepted.

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  60. @55, you can also do foxtrot or two-step with nearly any rock song (because all rock songs are in 4/4)

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  61. Is valentines day and prom etc an american thing or is it just corporate forced stuff like mothers day / fathers day etc ?

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  62. We did this at my grade school. You were just committed to one dance, and then left alone. In my school everyone was white and catholic, so it was not a problem. I can imagine it being a problem in a mixed school.

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