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Thursday, February 13, 2020

Conspiracy theory > mainstream news

No matter how outlandish the conspiracy theory, it is almost always more accurate than the mainstream news reporting of the official story:
The real owners of Crypto installed ‘backdoor vulnerabilities’ in its products which allowed the US and West Germany to eavesdrop on communications — from enemies and allies alike — which the senders believed had been successfully encrypted. We’re talking here about  top secret communications between leading government officials, spies, diplomats and military figures.

Just imagine that back in the 1970s or 80s you had claimed that the Crypto was a CIA front. You’d have been dismissed as a ‘crank conspiracy theorist, ’and/or ‘totally paranoid‘ by the gatekeepers of that time. But the rumours were true. Once again a ‘conspiracy theory’ has turned out  to be not as barmy as once depicted. Truth again proved to be stranger than fiction.

How much intelligence was gathered via Crypto is quite staggering. As RT has reported: “Throughout the 1980s — around 40% of all government transmissions analysed by the US National Security Agency (NSA) ran through Crypto‘s devices.”
As I have previously observed, the one and only version of events you can be absolutely certain is not true is whatever the official story happens to be.

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30 Comments:

Blogger thechortling February 13, 2020 9:33 PM  

And think about the implications for the wingnuts who voted for Hillary Rottenrougeserver Clinton in the last election. To this day they do not believe her private email setup was the least bit concerning.

Blogger Guy Incognito February 13, 2020 9:42 PM  

Just wait until they investigate VPN companies.

Blogger Akulkis February 13, 2020 9:50 PM  

Russian proverb: "Nothing is confirmed until it is officially denied."

Blogger Azure Amaranthine February 13, 2020 9:57 PM  

A little "paranoia" makes you accurate.

Blogger Shane Bradman February 13, 2020 10:15 PM  

The official story is always wrong. It's even wrong about the World Wars, the most documented and studied events in modern history. If they manage to get something so important wrong, how many minor things do you think they be ever gotten close to correct? They're wrong by intention.

Blogger [Redacted] February 13, 2020 10:42 PM  

Conspiracy theories are fun! A good one is that James Cameron, while surveying the Titanic, gathered blackmail material on the elites of that era with lasting implications on institutions and their functions today. If true, he used the material, and the destruction of other relics, to leverage some of the largest movie budgets in history. It wouldn't be the first time a salvage operation represented a huge technical challenge while also having political dimensions - see Project Azorian. Really fun stuff to think about.

Blogger CS February 13, 2020 10:49 PM  

"... the one and only version of events you can be absolutely certain is not true is whatever the official story happens to be." That being a generalization of the ancient rule: believe nothing until it has been officially denied.

Blogger Latigo3 February 13, 2020 11:43 PM  

This is not surprising.

Blogger Doktor Jeep February 14, 2020 12:00 AM  

I wish I was wrong

Blogger Unknownsailor February 14, 2020 12:20 AM  

OT:

Youtube just forced private a CSpan video of Senator Ron Paul asking a question on the Senate floor while the senate was in session about Misko and Ciaramella conspiring to get Trump removed.

That is to say YouTube just censored a video of a Senator acting in his official capacity.

There should be US Marshalls standing in the HQ of YouTube RIGHT NOW with subponeas and arrest warrants. The ability of Congress to speak while in session is explicitly Constitutionally guaranteed, and Google just stomped all over that with golf cleats.

Blogger Scuzzaman February 14, 2020 12:22 AM  

In our next conversation, whatever the topic, most here will have managed to erase this insight from their own thoughts.

The desperate need for public respectability is the major ally of the sellers of the big lie, the emperor’s shiny new clothes.

Blogger tublecane February 14, 2020 12:41 AM  

Back in the 70s and 80s, it's not as if people were generally naive about government eavesdropping. I mean, they may not have been aware of this or that particular instance. However, after the Church Committee it was public knowledge that "intelligence" agencies were at least trying to listen anywhere, everywhere they could.

Then FISA was passed, and what, we're supposed to think it's in hand now? Yes. In the hands of James Comey and a judge who accepts pinky-swears that everything's on the up-and-up.

For some reason, people never apply past conspiratorial knowledge to the next thing just outside what has been revealed. They can read biographies of Great Men and see a hundred conspiracies swirling around, yet one theory about a Current Great Man must be crazy. Because conspiracies ceased to exist yesterday?

Blogger tublecane February 14, 2020 12:57 AM  

@6- That is a good yarn, but first of all was the Titanic dive self-financed? I think 20th Century Fox paid for it, as publicity and to be used in place of special fx. Which would suggest Titanic was already greenlit.

Then the movie ran overbudget and had to be financed by different studios, which would be strange if Cameron had blackmailed it out of them. Maybe a cover story, but an elaborate one. One that could conceivably hurt the bottom line.

Plus, what did Cameron do with this blank check after Titanic? He has only finished one movie since (not counting documentaries): Avatar. Which also had a huge budget, but what has it done for him lately? A couple more Avatars no one's seen yet.

If we see some Cameron movies fail and a never-ending supply of money keep flowing to him, then I'd be more suspicious. As it is, he still looks like a profitable director.

Blogger Zander Stander February 14, 2020 1:37 AM  

That could be true *if* the Titanic actually sank. Some rare steel-eating bacteria will make the wreck disappear in two decades. The precise location is secret, to protect it from relic hunters. Those pesky hunters must have some pretty swanky salvage gear nowadays. Bob Ballard was on a secret Navy mission when he *accidentally* discovered the wreck. Which looks exactly like the one Leo rode. Of course the movie set was built based on Ballard's footage,not the other way around. Mkay.

Blogger furor kek tonicus ( Romney had "binders of women", Bloomberg has women legally bound ) February 14, 2020 2:18 AM  

Chrome based browsers aren't much better

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2020/02/500-chrome-extensions-secretly-uploaded-private-data-from-millions-of-users/

Blogger A guy in a dusty attic February 14, 2020 3:16 AM  

The great Wall of China was built to keep the Chinese in. Tartaria.

Blogger Azure Amaranthine February 14, 2020 3:33 AM  

"In our next conversation, whatever the topic, most here will have managed to erase this insight from their own thoughts."

Or will have determined just as stupidly that precisely the opposite must be true, somehow having never had a single person pull bargain bin reverse psych on them.

Better not to have learned a lesson than to have only learned to pretend that they have. The philosophical zombie does exist, and there he is.

"yet one theory about a Current Great Man must be crazy. Because conspiracies ceased to exist yesterday?"

All derivatives of humanism have to assume that humans are basically good. Or, with a TENS bent, that humans are getting better --sorry, "fitter"-- all the time. Never mind that those words have no meaning in their paradigm.

Blogger Azure Amaranthine February 14, 2020 6:13 AM  

"Chrome based browsers aren't much better"

Anyone to whom that is news after they consecutively read the words "Google Chrome", either doesn't know that Google does anything beyond be a search engine, or is far too dumb to breathe.

Blogger RedJack February 14, 2020 7:24 AM  

Back in the "old days" of the late 1990's, there were a lot of conspiracy theories.

Now those same "Crazy" topics are presented as "Well, yes we are doing this!"


Child sex trafficking, mass relentless surveillance, the FBI behaving as if it was the KGB....

I am going to stop, because I truly believe that we are heading to a crack up. Or the ovens.

Blogger RedJack February 14, 2020 7:25 AM  

Azure Amaranths

I am a Christian. My base understanding is "All have sinned".

My mom is a boomer. Her base understanding is "All are good! There is no sin!"

Guess which worldview has a better track record with reality.

Blogger basementhomebrewer February 14, 2020 7:51 AM  

Back in the 70s and 80s, it's not as if people were generally naive about government eavesdropping. I mean, they may not have been aware of this or that particular instance. However, after the Church Committee it was public knowledge that "intelligence" agencies were at least trying to listen anywhere, everywhere they could.

I am related to someone who was involved in an international incident during the cold war. My grandparents were on a party line and suddenly they were the only party on the line. My grandfather got pissed off by the constant surveillance one day, picked up the phone and asked to speak to a general at the pentagon. The call went through immediately. This type of stuff has been going on for a long time.

As a side note about distorted history and journalism. The newspapers were constantly hounding my family for comment at the time and they completely fabricated a quote from my grandmother about the situation which you can still find to this day if you type her name into a search engine. That caused a lasting rift in my family with my great uncle calling my Grandpa and telling him to tell his wife "to keep her damn mouth shut".

Blogger Boomer55 February 14, 2020 8:08 AM  

@18

This is relevant to the OT and this reply!

https://invidio.us/watch?v=wwRYyWn7BEo&t=159

"The bugs are the backdoors." It's very unlikely that governments are forcing well coded permanent backdoors in software like the Chromium Project, which powers Chrome, Brave, Opera, Vivaldi etc. They are putting BUGS, holding them for about 1 month at least (browsers update at least once a month), and then patching them when needed.

Blogger Sam Gem February 14, 2020 8:53 AM  

Huawei was the Deep State's own personal telecom company, setting up a PRIVATE satellite cellular network to evade the NSA, while using their cell towers in the US to suck up unencrypted data from our personal social media accounts.

Blogger Johnny February 14, 2020 9:08 AM  

Historically telephones and bank accounts of any sort were not secure. If money passes through an institution they can find you. And I know a guy who got picked up at the border. No doubt the guy who sold him the drugs turned him in. A second income for the seller I suppose.

I've long wondered how reliable these encryption methods are. It is a kind of obvious scam to have method that could be broken by some known method. If I were doing something that really required secrecy, I would buy a computer with cash and never turn it on when I was at home. And maybe disable the WiFi function when at home.

Not that I worry about this stuff. My security blanket is how unimportant I am. None the less my name came up when a neighbor was questioned by some security people. The only apparent link between him and me was that on very rare occasion he filed stuff through my home computer. Job applications, that sort of thing. I am not a member of any radical group and no illegal stuff, detained by cops but never arrested, and none the less they are at least dimly aware of me.

Blogger [Redacted] February 14, 2020 11:00 AM  

I see. The reason I thought looting the Titanic for its secrets was possible was because of the massive progress in technology. The idea being that as tech becomes cheaper, people could more easily afford to independently verify and investigate pools of evidence in ways impossible to do even a decade prior. James Cameron doing so with submarine tech and the Titanic would have been a compelling example of that.

You may be right though. Who knows exactly what is down there, or where "there" is. There are a lot of strange things going on with the Titanic, particularly with its reoccurring appearances in popular culture.

Blogger Balam February 14, 2020 12:04 PM  

[Redacted] wrote:You may be right though. Who knows exactly what is down there, or where "there" is. There are a lot of strange things going on with the Titanic, particularly with its reoccurring appearances in popular culture.

The popular conspiracy theory revolves around the death of three super rich aboard. Titanic sinks 1912, Federal Reserve pops up 1913. JP Morgan, Jekyll Island attendee and owner of the Titanic, mysteriously cancels on the maiden voyage despite having a personal suite at the last second. Smacks of the same business as Larry Silverstein skipping out on his daily commute to the WTC on 9/11.

Blogger Akulkis February 14, 2020 12:58 PM  

""The bugs are the backdoors." It's very unlikely that governments are forcing well coded permanent backdoors in software like the Chromium Project, which powers Chrome, Brave, Opera, Vivaldi etc. They are putting BUGS, holding them for about 1 month at least (browsers update at least once a month), and then patching them when needed."

This has been obvious for the last 2 decades.

Microsoft's turn-around time from bug-reported to patch being issued usually took MONTHS rather than the typical timeframe of hours to (at most) days for other software vendors.

When I found out about the extremely long turn-around times for patches on Microsoft bugs, it immediately occurred to me then that the reason for such delays was, when one backdoor was found, the delays were caused by looking for where to put a NEW backdoor to obtain the same information being shut off by patching the backdoor which had been discovered and reported as a bug.

And how do we know that Microsoft was spying on customers?

Expedia.com.

For what reason would Microsoft suddenly start up a travel website, other than by realizing, by data collected via illicit, clandestine telemetry from Internet Explorer, that businesses do a lot of travel planning for employees and executives. Someone at MS even let it slip once, that Expedia was due to analyzing URLs visited IE users.

Blogger Akulkis February 14, 2020 1:15 PM  

"You may be right though. Who knows exactly what is down there, or where "there" is. There are a lot of strange things going on with the Titanic, particularly with its reoccurring appearances in popular culture."

You don't think that the average person is inherently intrigued by the events and story concerning a ship going down on its maiden voyage... a ship which just so happened to be the largest, most luxurious ship in the world, brimming with extremely wealthy people, and all being lost because a company wanted to set a speed record, travelling full speed, at night, in iceberg-strewn waters?

By the way, it has come to light that there was a coal fire inside one of the bunkers. There's photographic evidence as well as written documentation.

Photograph of Titanic in port picking up passengers in Ireland shows scorching on the exterior of the hull, and some otherwise inexplicable wisps of haze. Most striking is that the scorch marks coincide with the location of where the outer hull started tearing, indicating that the hull failed due to the heat ruining the strength of the steel. (Additionally, sudden cooling one one surface by direct contact with ice probably made things even worse, by adding tremendous, unbalanced thermal stress between the inside surface and the exterior surface).

There's another anomoly: ALL of the ship's firemen (the guys who feed fuel into the boilers) were replaced in Ireland. When news of the sinking arrived by wireless telegraph, the president of the White Star line immediately sent out a telegram to the master of their office at the same port, telling him to locate all of the firemen who were replaced, and pay each of them a generous sum of money to leave town, individually, and keep their mouths shut about the Titanic.

The record of this telegraph message was located about a decade ago.

Blogger Boaty Bear February 15, 2020 3:43 AM  

Not to mention that Google also have a Graphics thingy called "Adreno"

Adreno + Chrome.....

https://infogalactic.com/w/index.php?search=Google+adreno&title=Special%3ASearch&go=Go

Blogger Ominous Cowherd February 16, 2020 11:17 AM  

@28, fires in colliers or coal bunkers happened. Conrad's story Youth is about exactly that. Not implausable there was a fire smoldering on board. They probably would have been fine if it weren't for the iceberg.

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