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Saturday, September 12, 2020

Doomed to repeat history

The reason I stress the importance of developing a regular habit of reading history, especially those histories that are not on the A-list of classics recommended by generation after generation of historians, is that it is the only way to develop a sense of pattern recognition for large-scale events taking place over an extended period of time. Notice how the growing chaos we are witnessing in the United States and elsewhere across the invaded West would not be lost on Machiavelli. He would have immediately recognized the situation as being the inevitable consequence of a republic being overrun by people with different customs, modes of living, religions, and languages, and would also have been able to predict the eventual consequences for that republic, as this selection from his History of Florence and of the Affairs of Italy demonstrates.

For surely if any times were truly miserable for Italy and the provinces overrun by the barbarians, they were those which occurred from Arcadius and Honorius to Theodoric. If we only consider the evils which arise to a republic or a kingdom by a change of prince or of government; not by foreign interference, but by civil discord (in which we may see how even slight variations suffice to ruin the most powerful kingdoms or states), we may then easily imagine how much Italy and the other Roman provinces suffered, when they not only changed their forms of government and their princes, but also their laws, customs, modes of living, religion, language, and name. Any one of such changes, by itself, without being united with others, might, with thinking of it, to say nothing of the seeing and suffering, infuse terror into the strongest minds.

From these causes proceeded the ruin as well as the origin and extension of many cities. Among those which were ruined were Aquileia, Luni, Chiusi, Popolonia, Fiesole, and many others. The new cities were Venice, Sienna, Ferrara, Aquila, with many towns and castles which for brevity we omit. Those which became extended were Florence, Genoa, Pisa, Milan, Naples, and Bologna; to all of which may be added, the ruin and restoration of Rome, and of many other cities not previously mentioned.

From this devastation and new population arose new languages, as we see in the different dialects of France, Spain and Italy; which, partaking of the native idiom of the new people and of the old Roman, formed a new manner of discourse. Besides, not only were the names of provinces changed, but also of lakes, rivers, seas, and men; for France, Spain, and Italy are full of fresh names, wholly different from the ancient; as, omitting many others, we see that the Po, the Garda, the Archipelago, are names quite different from those which the ancients used; while instead of Cæsar and Pompey we have Peter, Matthew, John, etc.

Among so many variations, that of religion was not of little importance; for, while combating the customs of the ancient faith with the miracles of the new, very serious troubles and discords were created among men. And if the Christians had been united in one faith, fewer disorders would have followed; but the contentions among themselves, of the churches of Rome, Greece, and Ravenna, joined to those of the heretic sects with the Catholics, served in many ways to render the world miserable. Africa is a proof of this; having suffered more horrors from the Arian sect, whose doctrines were believed by the Vandals, than from any avarice or natural cruelty of the people themselves. Living amid so many persecutions, the countenances of men bore witness of the terrible impressions upon their minds; for besides the evils they suffered from the disordered state of the world, they scarcely could have recourse to the help of God, in whom the unhappy hope for relief; for the greater part of them, being uncertain what divinity they ought to address, died miserably, without help and without hope.

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65 Comments:

Blogger Gettimothy September 12, 2020 9:32 AM  

The reason I stress the importance of developing a regular habit of reading history, especially those histories that are not on the A-list of classics recommended by generation after generation of historians, is that it is the only way to develop a sense of pattern recognition for large-scale events taking place over an extended period of time

I started reading A History of Central Banking and the Enslavement of Mankind over breakfast this morning and was struck by your very point.

Caesar was the Trump of his day. You can read Sundance to see Trump starting the process of wresting control over our money away from the (((same))) (((goddamned))) (((grifters))) .
Pray their is no Brutus (Looking at you, Pence). The acts and actors are "identical" to my non-historical mind.

I am very glad that VP has so many historically literate men and women commenting here; you folks are extremely valuable to us who do not know history.





Blogger Gregory the Tall September 12, 2020 9:45 AM  

"If we only consider the evils which arise to a republic or a kingdom by a change of prince or of government..."
A Tunisian taxi driver in Paris said to me: Before the Arab spring we had a dozen thieves in the government, now we have a thousand.

Blogger Jose Miguel September 12, 2020 9:55 AM  

@1

Pay for an Augustus to come next who will end this war on family and patriarchy. Augustus was seen by the early Church as a type of Christ.

Blogger Balkan Yankee September 12, 2020 9:59 AM  

"Caesar was the Trump of his day. You can read Sundance to see Trump starting the process of wresting control over our money away from the (((same))) (((goddamned))) (((grifters)))."

"A Tunisian taxi driver in Paris said to me: Before the Arab spring we had a dozen thieves in the government, now we have a thousand."

Grifters and Thieves. Psychopaths and Sociopaths. Elitists and Oligarchs.

You name it. We have all seen it before.

It's the classic problem of too many vampires, not enough necks.

Blogger Critias September 12, 2020 10:22 AM  

@1 Gettimothy, if you read "The Babylonian Woe" after that, I think those two books go together pretty well.

I remember history in school, what they do is focus in on the little details and tell you nothing about the big picture. We got so many lessons on what it was like in the trenches and the living conditions there during a war that happened over 100 years ago. No idea what it was about to this day. Never taught anything about Rome either.

It would be of massive benefit if someone could throw together a history course - a reading list and examinations of the important lessons. We've had about 2,500 years of recorded civilization, there are so many gems and little nuggets in that but it's a daunting exercise finding them.

Blogger Skyler the Weird September 12, 2020 10:29 AM  

Trump is

Blogger Matthew Baker September 12, 2020 10:32 AM  

I say we rhetorically advocate for “trans-cultural acceptance” just as transsexual advocacy has sharpened the lines of sexual differences, so too could advocating for “trans culture peoples”. Don’t de trans culture phobic, let the hyphens participate in American culture.

Blogger Colonel Blimp September 12, 2020 10:36 AM  

You mean in the past tense right? Augustus died some years before Christ became known.

Blogger sappbe September 12, 2020 10:45 AM  

For those of us ignorant of real history, not what was taught in school, where should I start? I've seen plenty of evidence of, "there is nothing new under the sun" in recent events as it compares to the USA right now, but I'll admit my overall ignorance. No offense to Vox, whom I do trust, but I'd prefer not to simply parrot your ideas.

Blogger Crew September 12, 2020 11:02 AM  

For those who cannot afford the book, here is an on-line version:

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2464/2464-h/2464-h.htm

Blogger Skyler the Weird September 12, 2020 11:12 AM  

Trump isn't Caesar he is the Gracchi. The Gracchi brothers tried to overturn the Elites invade the World invite the World (as Slaves) by introducing land reform to break up public owned estates the Elites were working with slaves from the conquered provinces and giving land to Roman citizens returned from the Republican Wars. Like Trump and the other GOP they also looked to grant citizenship to the Novus Homo, the New Man, the Italian allies of the Republic thinking they would get their votes in the Assembly. The Gracchi were both in their turn murdered by elite sponsored mobs and thrown in the Tiber.

This has happened before and will happen again.

Blogger Skyler the Weird September 12, 2020 11:15 AM  

Where is Gaius Marius or Francisco Franco when you need them?

Blogger Evstratios September 12, 2020 11:15 AM  

Primary reason I have so much respect for you as a person directly. Prior to 2012 and reading your entire written output, I had become disillusioned and believed that those who shared my intellectual mindset were near exclusively long dead. This brotherhood of able minds amongst your following has been fortifying.

With Machiavelli a household name for Il Principe, one of the things I always ask when he comes up is and what did you think of The History of Florence? Crickets all the way down and obviously few had ever read The Prince in the first place, but I digress.

There are only so many statements more chilling than that last paragraph, today as it was when I first wrote it down as a teen 20 years ago.

And the 'intellectuals' of today cry, AI please save us!

Blogger Silent Draco September 12, 2020 11:22 AM  

Another overlooked bit is at the beginning of Thucydides' "Peloponnesean Wars", where the reader is reminded to look at the interests, fears, and prestige for the competing city-states. This extends to any competing groups. It ties directly to Sun Tzu's dictum to know yourself and know your enemy.

Blogger xevious2030 September 12, 2020 11:33 AM  

Is it any wonder the Promethians have long presented Machiavelli, and such as evil and disgusting, as he awakens the immune system to the danger.

Blogger Ominous Cowherd September 12, 2020 11:41 AM  

Colonel Blimp wrote:You mean in the past tense right? Augustus died some years before Christ became known.
A type is a previous, lesser example that foreshadows and illustrates what the real thing will be like, in the future. So if @3 really meant Type, then yes, he means that Augustus preceded Christ. A pagan emperor a type of Christ? That's a new conceit. I wonder if Jose meant Saint Augustine? He couldn't be a type of Christ, since he came after.
Jose Miguel wrote:Augustus was seen by the early Church as a type of Christ.
Many in the early church allegorized the Bible into meaningless nonsense, so I take the early church with a grain of salt. They weren't all wrong all the time, but they were men like us and some of them got pretty goofy.

Blogger Newscaper312 September 12, 2020 11:43 AM  

Am I correct in assuming that "Africa" here means just North Africa populated by Caucasoids, on the Mediterranean coast?

Blogger Jose Miguel September 12, 2020 12:06 PM  

@8 Colonel Blimp

Type in this case means like a precursor. Many Fathers saw Augustus as being like Christ since he brought order to Rome after it's civil war, and was a monarch like Christ from the Father's view. He also has parallels with John the Baptist in that the Pax Romana secured by Augustus and all those Roman Highways prepared the way for the Gospel to spread quickly, even to India and Ethiopia beyond the empire's borders.

America needs a Caesar to break the banks, and re-establish pater familias. Same age-old struggle.

Blogger Jose Miguel September 12, 2020 12:08 PM  

@16 Ominous Cowherd

Think of the example of Emperor Cyrus, who enabled the rebuilding of the temple in Nehemiah's and Ezra's time. God can use pagans for his glory, and did the same with Augustus, who in this case unknowingly did much to lay the physical groundwork for the Gospel to flourish.

Blogger Unknown September 12, 2020 12:24 PM  

@Critias and @sappbe
You may want to consider as a starting point "The Politically Incorrect Guide to Western Civilization" by Anthony Esolen. It's a decent compendium of the ebbs and flows of Western Civilization, though you have to accept the author's somewhat unapologetic Catholic perspective (I, a non-Catholic, had no problem with such acceptance).

There's a great bibliography that will start you on the historical journey you're looking for, but with the context of the 60,000 foot view Esolen provides tracing 2500-years of western history.

Blogger Gettimothy September 12, 2020 12:44 PM  

Critias wrote:@1 Gettimothy, if you read "The Babylonian Woe" after that, I think those two books go together pretty well.

Thank you. I found a PDF here

I remember history in school, what they do is focus in on the little details and tell you nothing about the big picture. ...

I gave up on it for the same reason; I could never see the point of memorizing disconnected minutia. I did have the benefit of tutoring a History major in Algebra some years back.
I asked him something, and he recounted the Battle of Gettysburg in such vibrant detail and with such evident joy on his face, that I decided it was best to leave the History to the men and women who enjoyed it.




It would be of massive benefit if someone could throw together a history course - a reading list and examinations of the important lessons. We've had about 2,500 years of recorded civilization, there are so many gems and little nuggets in that but it's a daunting exercise finding them.

I volunteer for Infogalactic tech. We are on a huge sub-project at the moment that I hope to have finished this year. With that running and stable, a brainstorm I have is "timelines". For example, "The History of Knowledge" is something I enjoyed because it displays the progression of ideas I care about. "A History of the Calculus" by Berlinski for the same reason. Lo-and-behold, Charles Murray wrote "Human Accomplishment" and I knew that this would be a good vehicle for me to teach myself History along a methodology I enjoy. He breaks History into 400 year chunks and then highlights the human accomplishments starting with Sumeria.

So, for Infogalactic, have a page, a timeline page, that starts with Sumeria and links to lessons on the material from that book. Progression and mastery is tracked, AI is developed to help you learn (see DuoLingo algorithm for Latin lessons for an example of a pretty simple technique on this)

I also have a brainstorm for 'certifications' where Infogalactic tracks demonstrated competency and recency of experience--ideas directly from Aviation certifications and permissions. My gut tells me that they will be a benchmark currency in the realm of ideas.

I think it would be really cool to earn a certificate in competency in Sumerian "whatever they did" and have Infogalactic keep me sharp on what I have learned through tools that quiz me and force me to refresh as I go about my business. Who here does not regret forgetting something you learned in college that would prove really useful today? Several for me: Stats, Math and Geography. Anyhoo, by the time I am done with that timeline, I should have an interesting sense of the scope of History that our host refers too.

If/when I build the tools where others can build their own timelines--the good Dr. who posts here on the Middle Ages, for example--then we should be able to wrest education from the state completely and radically improve the educational level throughout Christendom (and the Galaxy...it is Infogalactic after all (:



Blogger Homesteader September 12, 2020 12:49 PM  

This comment has been removed by the author.

Blogger Gettimothy September 12, 2020 12:58 PM  

Addendum to my previous comment. I am not going to bother with Murray's "Human Accomplishment" until I have developed the tools that will keep me current and fluent in it. I think those tools will be a nice addition to the Canon.

Speaking of which....the Canon of Christendom/Western Civ will be an excellent addition to the timelines .

Also, I have a hunch John C. Wright would chomp at the bit to develop a timeline/methodology for certfications in The History of Philosophy.

I truly think it will be a lot of fun for all involved. The key is the certs backing knowledge and educational achievement unparalleled in the history of humankind.

ALSO!!! we can , and should, expand it to working class pursuits. Demonstrated knowledge and fluency in gun-smithing , the Allen-Bradly PLC series, or the Bystronic Press-Brake, for example.
Very valuable to employers.

The key is to make the tools where domain experts can create the curricula.

anyhoo...you can tell this interests me (:

also, Vox can make moar money to add to his stash. Just hope that Smaug doesn't smell all the gold. (:

Blogger Ominous Cowherd September 12, 2020 1:29 PM  

Jose Miguel wrote:God can use pagans for his glory, and did the same with Augustus, who in this case unknowingly did much to lay the physical groundwork for the Gospel to flourish.I agree with this. I definitely wouldn't call Augustus a type of Christ: he certainly did much to prepare for God's messiah, but he did nothing to foreshadow Him. Maybe Augustus was a type of John the Baptist? But Augustus was more in the mold of Pharaoh than of Cyrus or Nebuchadnezzar, both of whom did God's will more or less knowingly and willingly.

I generally won't call any Old Testament anything a type, unless it is identified as such in the New Testament. There are a great many illustrations and foreshadowings in the OT that are wonderful and real, but few types, by that standard.

Blogger Ranger September 12, 2020 1:34 PM  

Their mindset was different. Owen Barfield goes deeply into this. C.S Lewis, influenced by Barfield, scratches it a little bit, but enough to show how different, and is a far easier read than Barfield.

Blogger RadixMalorum September 12, 2020 1:35 PM  

Gettimothy wrote:
Caesar was the Trump of his day. You can read Sundance to see Trump starting the process of wresting control over our money away from the (((same))) (((goddamned))) (((grifters))) .


There are also parallels with late Han dynasty imperial China. The corrupt bureaucratic eunuchs had subverted the government and caused destabilization in the country.

The yellow turban rebellion arose out of that disaster and was funded by subversive elements in the government.

Trump is like He Jin, the reformer who tried to clear out the entrenched corruption in the capital and re-establish the Han but was undermined, ambushed, and killed.

His lieutenant Dong Zhou then seized power, purged all the bureaucratic opposition and became a tyrant which started off the 3 Kingdoms era leading to centuries of bloody internal conflict.

US's trajectory seems to track with the late Han Dynasty of China.

Blogger jessant September 12, 2020 1:45 PM  

People should also read the texts of Sanatana Dharma. In one of the texts, it gives the number of people that a city can hold before it degenerates into evil. The Śrīmad Bhāgavatam is a good place to start.

Blogger Zeroh Tollrants September 12, 2020 2:11 PM  

As a typical woman, mathematics was always my weakest subject, compounded by the fact I really disliked it.
The think I resent the most is the poor history education I received over 16 years. Despite my reading over the years, I still struggle putting events in order, chronologically, in my mind.
If you homeschoolers do nothing else, start early and give your children a deep historical knowledge base, the likes of which I wished I would've received.

Blogger cecilhenry September 12, 2020 3:21 PM  

@5



Mortimer Adler created a list of the Great books of Western Literature for auto-didacts.

It is a good starting point:
I believe this is it:


https://thinkingasleverage.wordpress.com/book-lists/mortimer-adlers-reading-list/


Blogger sappbe September 12, 2020 3:46 PM  

Thanks. I will check it out.

Blogger CM September 12, 2020 3:50 PM  

I started with the Bible and putting it in historical context.

Blogger Ariadne Umbrella September 12, 2020 4:14 PM  

um, there's a really pretty thucydides with maps. it's written by one person, so it's not got "committee voice."

decline and fall by gibbons. You can buy single volumes for cheap second hand. there's a compressed one- don't get that, it's way, way too compressed.

There's a book of maps of history of the world. any one sentence in the book is an entire section of history, but it's good to see on a map what is being talked about.

I like Landes' big book on wealth and poverty. It has a dustcover with a pretty map on it, but it reads light instead of heavy.

The Columbia History of the World will force march you through everything in three inches of close type. It's, obviously, a general history, but that's what you are looking for?

The Will and Ariel Durant series gets cited a lot, but it's nearly unreadable. I mean, (paraphrasing)- in the first book they have a sentence saying there were literally thousands of peasant rebellions in China, but a paragraph or so later they say "the peasant was content with his lot." So- who was rebelling? and who was content? Or calling Maria de Medici "no better than she had to be"- I was trying to look up if she poisoned people and who started the St Bartholomew's Day Massacre. I'd just seen a movie about it. I still cannot tell what happened from Will and Ariel Durant, but I can tell you about the movie (dreamy king, gorgeous trampy queen, angry middle-aged mom, dead people, velvet) I think the only thing the movie maker is angry about is that there's a middle aged woman in the movie.

Blogger The Last Roman September 12, 2020 4:48 PM  

The fruit of our republic fell far from its Roman root. Could anyone imagine a modern US Senator stabbing a tyrant in the Senate in the manner that Brutus and his cohort ventelated poor old Caesar? Could the US sustain a Cannae, rebuild, and then beat that opponent?

Blogger Gregory the Tall September 12, 2020 4:48 PM  

I read the "Principe" when I was young. At the time I thought it was good advice on how to keep a society stable and could not understand what was so "Machiavellian" about it.

Blogger Duke Norfolk September 12, 2020 5:59 PM  

@10 And don't forget, you can get it in ebook form too (i.e. epub or Kindle).

https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/2464

Blogger Chip Hazard September 12, 2020 6:00 PM  

@12

A Hero Will Rise. Nature abhors a vacuum. It simply MUST occur.

The blackpillers say that Trump is just a speed bump. Maybe at this particular moment, but his leadership has shown other that it is not only possible to fight, but also to win.

I'm gonna paraphrase here: Real Americans love to fight. They fight to win and won't tolerate a Loser.

We're gonna get Leaders and Fighters and Winners.
It's gonna be a Venn diagram. YOU MIGHT EVEN GET TIRED OF IT.

Blogger Duke Norfolk September 12, 2020 6:09 PM  

Ariadne Umbrella wrote:decline and fall by gibbons. You can buy single volumes for cheap second hand.

You can get that at Gutenberg too.
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/25717

Blogger Critias September 12, 2020 6:23 PM  

@Gettimothy

Thank you for all the work you're putting in, it's really appreciated.

@20
Thank you, I will check that book out!

Blogger Hezekiah Garrett September 12, 2020 7:35 PM  

It should be pointed out that accurate histories are valuable.

Gibbon ain't that. I mean, the Roman Empire fell to the Ottomans, a millenium later than Gibbon gives.

Blogger tublecane September 12, 2020 7:57 PM  

Esolen did an excellent translation of the Divine Comedy, with very good and extensive footnotes.

I also recall reading a book by him defending traditional marriage.

Blogger RadixMalorum September 12, 2020 7:59 PM  

Chip Hazard wrote:
I'm gonna paraphrase here: Real Americans love to fight. They fight to win and won't tolerate a Loser.


Let's hope that there's enough real Americans left to do the fighting.

Blogger tublecane September 12, 2020 8:11 PM  

There’s Machiavelli and then there’s Machiavelli, if you know what I mean. The Prince is so famous that it drowns out the rest of the man’s work for most people. Did his name become a byword for evil on purpose? Possibly.

I must point out that when I was a dumb, ill-informed college student I had a History of Florence recommended to me.

Machiavelli revisionism is a popular subject amongst some unconventional authors. For instance, one of the few valuable neocons: James Burnham. He wrote a whole book called the Machiavellians: Defenders of Freedom. Which I figured would be an exercise in contradiction, but turned out to be a tour-de-force.

Blogger Chief_Tuscaloosa September 12, 2020 8:38 PM  

@9 Sappbe "sappbe wrote:For those of us ignorant of real history, not what was taught in school, where should I start?

I'd recommend reading up on why the Germans sank the Lusitania, despite knowing it was chock-full of women and children and the Western press would crucify them afterwards. Also why Churchill didn't provide an escort. History books say "The Germans killed women and children on the Lusitania so the U.S. got mad and kicked their ass, no more to the story, the end." To the contrary, there's a lot to the story, not least the fact that Americans used women and children as human shields for an ammo supply run on a civilian cruise ship.

Pearl Harbor in history books, ditto: "The Japanese attacked us with zero provocation and it was a complete surprise to us, the USA got mad and kicked ass, no more to the story, the end." Really?

Basically, https://infogalactic.com/info/Sinking_of_the_lusitania to start

Blogger Ariadne Umbrella September 12, 2020 9:49 PM  

Gibbon has the single most useful set of pages: the Green and Blue Riots, with maps. The current malefactors rioting to upset a political supreme executive? The extreme right and extreme left being horrifyingly corrupt? The tarty queen backing up her man?

Everyone has that the Green and Blue rioters were upset about chariot races, which makes them seem like excitable yutes with some misplaced priorities. They'd deposed four other emperors that century alone. The colors seem ridiculous: Leek Greens? That's when a historian gets prissy and precise.

Okay, well, one side had Jews, pagans and barbarians- all of whom were avid slave raiders, slave dealers, and so on. Justinian had just closed out a war on a small, impoverished nation- Lazica. Lazica had wood, maybe some amber, and women. Justinian had just messed up their money, not even a lot of money.

I mean, it's not like we don't have GEOTUS shutting down human trafficking (read women and children slaves from impoverished small countries) with a tarty woman gone very virtuous to back him up. We don't have a GEOTUS rewriting the laws and regulations to make things fairer and better. We certainly don't have rioters with a habit of rioting all over the place for close to 60 years. We definitely haven't had any presidents executed, now have we?

I mean, why would you read the magisterial big work, if you could just be sniffy about it?

Anyway, that's why I keep saying " nylon rope, lights along highways...." because that's how Justinian bought a millenium of peace for normal people. Large scale, massive law and order, for all miscreants, both sides.

I mean, it's not like the Christian leaders are deeply virtuous right now: would you take a bullet for Mr Falwell after last week? Does anyone take the pope seriously as a religious person?


And, yes, echoey historians can't take Gibbon seriously, because he does mention their atrocious behavior for the entire course of Roman history. Which affects how Americans learn history, post World War 2- they handed education over to them, at least for the majority. Private schools seem to keep copies of Gibbon on hand.

It's a brisk read. It's not ponderous, or intimidating, or vague or awful. He hasn't much use for Christians, but that's sort of an occupational hazard of classical education. It's not too big, too heavy or too much that an ordinary person could not read it with pleasure and comprehension.





Blogger Ariadne Umbrella September 12, 2020 9:54 PM  

smaller histories about things that interest you are good, too. mostly because historians have quirks, and if you know anything about your subject, you'll see the quirks falling out of their closet.

there's a history of the americas getting emotional about native americans dying of measles, but dismisses the 1/3 death rate from black plague. so you know this is a hostile writer, for instance.

Blogger Chip Hazard September 12, 2020 9:54 PM  

"Let's hope that there's enough real Americans left to do the fighting."

There are plenty. Enough blackpills, I'm full up on other sites, thanx.

My woman is a Daughter of the American Revolution. She's down with the fight. She's a 90's broad and even though I have trained her in weapons she's not 100%. That's on me. The rest is due to Boomer parents and basic femme bullshit.

Blogger Chip Hazard September 12, 2020 10:26 PM  

There's a bit of reality need to be injected there, Chief.

The Imp Japs were fucking scumbags, Oriental to the extreme, monkey people basically. I know the Chinese people are shit due to Communism, but they don't deserve to be raped and decapitated at will prior or even presently.

The oil embargo forced the Jap political hand. This is a political question that comes out of the F.D.R. admin and others may weigh in on this here. And in no way are you, or I, the last word.

I am in no way behind the raping and mindless murder of people on their own soil. Most need to go back on OUR soil. There are functions behind this action, and violence needs to occur on some level to achieve this.

This rant does not negate nationalism. What part of Vox's posting of Mongolian videos did you not understand?!

Blogger RadixMalorum September 12, 2020 10:37 PM  

Chip Hazard wrote:"Let's hope that there's enough real Americans left to do the fighting."

There are plenty. Enough blackpills, I'm full up on other sites, thanx.



My woman is a Daughter of the American Revolution. She's down with the fight. She's a 90's broad and even though I have trained her in weapons she's not 100%. That's on me. The rest is due to Boomer parents and basic femme bullshit.


Why would you train your woman in weapons when she's far more useful to your cause having as many children as possible? Putting one of the mothers of the future of your nation in potential danger is the most stupid thing you can do.

Blogger Chill Penguin September 12, 2020 10:51 PM  

the class interest of the political class is that us peasants will be taxed at the long term Laffer maximum for the glory of the realm, their individual interest is that they will loot everything, including women, and purge the political class of anyone with muddleheaded patriotic ideas or irrationally intolerant of other people's behavior, and the class interest of the monarchial class is to purge the political class of degenerates and traitors
@44, that's why most academics are atheists

Blogger map September 12, 2020 10:56 PM  

Machiavelli is a far more humane figure that the pop-psychology version we get.

What historians say about Machiavelli: "The Ends Justified the Means."

What Machiavelli really said: "The Means might accuse him but the Ends excuse him, so long as the Ends are Just."

Blogger TiredPoorHungry September 12, 2020 11:02 PM  

My compliments to the learned host here. I have little to add and a lot to learn.
Machiavellis tone in the above discourse sounded like us as we list the trials we endure today. Then reading these posts, I see enthusiasm and answers using history. Pray, We won't be fooled again!

Blogger map September 12, 2020 11:03 PM  

cecilhenry wrote:@5

Mortimer Adler created a list of the Great books of Western Literature for auto-didacts.

It is a good starting point:

I believe this is it:

https://thinkingasleverage.wordpress.com/book-lists/mortimer-adlers-reading-list/



Eccho this. I have "The Great Books of Western Civ" from Mortimer Adler, and it includes The Syntopicon, which is an index for self-learning this set.

The set is the size of the full Encyclopedia Britannica.

https://www.google.com/search?q=encyclopedia+britannica&sxsrf=ALeKk03ZLfx4GygjegfogS_Taw3tAD93og:1599966107439&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=-CXwZUDJCrFDOM%252CYoHjB5mIQsFbzM%252C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kSigvSxJ78opjmsHctHcGF2iZVV5Q&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwir4_GbkuXrAhXLHM0KHYcaAcsQ9QF6BAgKEFs#imgrc=-CXwZUDJCrFDOM

Blogger xevious2030 September 12, 2020 11:19 PM  

It's been a while since I read The Prince, but I remember the apprehension for the disgustingness I was about to encounter. Upon completion, I was left wondering what the critics were talking about. Finding they invert, to include value, their criticism is consistent.

Blogger Snidely Whiplash September 12, 2020 11:20 PM  

Chip Hazard wrote:I know the Chinese people are shit due to Communism, but they don't deserve to be raped and decapitated at will prior or even presently.
Has there ever been, in the 20,000 year history of the Han, a ruler who was not entitled to rape and/or decapitate at will?
The Japanese made the mistake of doing it while not Han.

Blogger Chief_Tuscaloosa September 13, 2020 12:20 AM  

@Chip Hazard,

I was remarking that what the history books say about how Pearl Harbor happened aren't telling the whole truth. I'm of the opinion FDR pushed the Japanese into a corner hoping they would attack us. I'm also of the opinion FDR knew they were attacking Pearl Harbor the weekend of 7 December but didn't let the warning go through because he wanted the casualties in order to convince the American people that neutrality was not going to work.

In all of the above, do I say we should have made friends with the Japanese and invited them to our house so they could bang our sisters?

Japanese/Chinese/Germans killing Brits--none of it was our problem until Pearl Harbor happened.

Blogger Ominous Cowherd September 13, 2020 12:42 AM  

RadixMalorum wrote:Why would you train your woman in weapons when she's far more useful to your cause having as many children as possible?
You always want to be around to defend her, but you won't always be. You might need backup, too. She should never be on the front line, but sometimes stuff happens wherever one might be.
RadixMalorum wrote:Putting one of the mothers of the future of your nation in potential danger is the most stupid thing you can do.
Being unarmed or unable is a potential danger.
There is nothing unfeminine about having basic competence with firearms, and there is nothing unfeminine about being able to hit your target.

Blogger Gypsy September 13, 2020 4:40 AM  

I have always been a little lamb lost in the wood but thanks to this blog I have remembered that there is Good and there is Evil. Gratitude to VD.

Blogger Unknown September 13, 2020 2:02 PM  

Is there a list of such must read histories in the thread or would someone please provide a link? Thankyou.

Blogger RadixMalorum September 13, 2020 2:17 PM  

Ominous Cowherd wrote:RadixMalorum wrote:Why would you train your woman in weapons when she's far more useful to your cause having as many children as possible?

You always want to be around to defend her, but you won't always be. You might need backup, too. She should never be on the front line, but sometimes stuff happens wherever one might be.

RadixMalorum wrote:Putting one of the mothers of the future of your nation in potential danger is the most stupid thing you can do.

Being unarmed or unable is a potential danger.

There is nothing unfeminine about having basic competence with firearms, and there is nothing unfeminine about being able to hit your target.


If you're at the point where you're falling back on your women to defend your home or themselves then you're doomed already. That's what your community is for. You build up your community and have organized men to back each other up.

You people are still plagued with the mindset that you can go about it with just you and your family if you just arm enough or train enough. That's a recipe for losing your civilization. You can't defend or regain ground until you organize your men and put your women to work making babies.

Blogger Chill Penguin September 13, 2020 4:57 PM  

@55 there's more to it than the US had broken the Japanese code and knew they were coming, in Jan 1941 FDR told the Portuguese ambassador to tell his government not to worry about Timor because the US was going to crush Japan, knowing that the Japanese had broken the Portuguese code
@59 you don't deserve the kind of wife who points a gun at an arsonist on your property and makes him lie down on the road for the cops to pick up

Blogger Damelon Brinn September 13, 2020 5:25 PM  

My sister had to shoot a stray dog that was attacking their livestock one day while her husband was 30 miles away at work. It could have been attacking one of their kids. Unless you're going to keep your wife and small children in an ivory kitchen/nursery surrounded by guards, she should know how to use a gun.

Blogger Ominous Cowherd September 14, 2020 1:55 PM  

RadixMalorum wrote:f you're at the point where you're falling back on your women to defend your home or themselves then you're doomed already.
Totally bogus, dude. We can't all live in the commune and never go out alone. Damelon Brinn gets it in @61.
RadixMalorum wrote:That's what your community is for. You build up your community and have organized men to back each other up.
That's important, too.

Blogger RadixMalorum September 14, 2020 4:57 PM  

Ominous Cowherd wrote:RadixMalorum wrote:f you're at the point where you're falling back on your women to defend your home or themselves then you're doomed already.

Totally bogus, dude. We can't all live in the commune and never go out alone. Damelon Brinn gets it in @61.


You think just having guns and training protected the South African farmers from having their families tortured and killed? Unless you actually organize and learn how to operate as a collective your family's not going to survive what's coming.

Your lone armed wife isn't going to overcome a gang of armed Tyrones when they come for your family no matter how well you train her.

Blogger Valar Addemmis September 14, 2020 6:01 PM  

RadixMalorum wrote:Your lone armed wife isn't going to overcome a gang of armed Tyrones when they come for your family no matter how well you train her.

Nor would you, in the same scenario. So according to your own reasoning, there's no point in you training yourself at arms either.

Everyone has already agreed with your larger point while pointing out that being competent at arms has advantages in other scenarios. The horse you're flogging is well and truly dead. It's not even recognizable as a horse at this point.

Blogger Azure Amaranthine September 15, 2020 3:16 AM  

Competency at arms is the only thing that's even potentially going to put your wife on a similar combat level to a man. You should be celebrating it if you care about her, not pretending that you yourself are all-powerful.

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