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Thursday, October 29, 2020

What ails the USA

The two primary problems are debt and immigration, as can be seen by this comparison of 1952 and 2020 prices.

Any program or policy that does not directly address those two problems, or remove those responsible for creating those two problems from influence, will fail.

84 comments:

  1. It's not a bug - it's a feature.

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  2. I'm really glad we're doing a "Platinum Plan" for the blacks, and an "American Dream Plan" for the Latinos. That should fix this up, no problem.

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  3. So what’s interesting about this chart are two things
    1) the red items for the most part are obviously debt driven items, which essentially priced the point.
    2) the green items are “cash” items So the prices stay in check. I’d also argue that with today’s methods of production (hormones, industrialized processing) helps keep them far below inflation. I’d guess that organic foods today are more similar to those in 1952, which would close the gap and make the inflation ratio pretty damn close to 1:1

    Great chart.

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    1. The green items are also closer to lost leaders at a grocery store.

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  4. Free trade means expensive houses, cars and dentists but cheap consumable goods

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  5. Interesting. How do CPI's account for the fundamental changes in product? For example sugar is sugar in 1952 or today. But a car is substantially different in terms of features and quality, etc over 70 years.

    Its also interesting how debt plays into the evolution of car qualtity. There are no more Ford Escorts or Geo Metro's, etc. That's probably because 100% of the customers are borrowing the money anyway, so "should I get a loan"? isn't even a decision that has to be made anymore...

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    1. How to account for quality differences? Don't bother. A car is a car. If you can't get one without all the gee whiz gizmos, the theoretical price doesn't matter. Only reality matters. Sure cars are better now - but at enormous cost.

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    2. Bullcrap. You want to account for quality differences? It's not about "gee whiz gizmos," it's about reliability. A car from the 50's almost never made it to 100k miles. But 100k on a car from the last 30 years is nothing.

      Sure, a new car may cost $38k instead of $18k, but it lasts 3x as long. This also creates a decent used car market. It's possible today to buy a $4000 used car that will last more miles that a $3000 new car purchased in the 60's, and that's unadjusted dollars.

      Not to take away from Vox's larger point. But honestly, having cars in that list is kind of like having TVs.

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  6. The debt problem is due to Nixon taking the US off the Gold Standard. I still don't understand why Roger Stone hearts Nixon a lot.

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    1. Nixon took the USA off the gold standard because its not possible to wage useless bullshit wars without an unlimited supply of fiat money.

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  7. I think the columns are the 1952 price (1952), the 1952 price in current dollars (Inflation), the current price (Today), and the ratio of Today/Inflation (Difference). Correct?

    Real income has been cut in half, house prices have more than tripled, at least sugar, milk and coffee have gotten a little easier to buy. It'll take about twice as many hours work to buy a pound of bacon today, compared to 1952.

    House and car prices we can blame on a combo of financialization and women in the work force, plus immigrants. The blame for the falling real wage has to go to women in the workforce, plus immigrants and offshoring.

    Tl;dr version: your government hates you and wants you to die, so they can replace you.

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    1. There's a lot more stuff that goes into a 2020 Chevy than a 52 Chevy. That has to account for part of the increase in car prices.

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  8. Isn't this a bit circular as the inflation calculation is based on the rise in consumer prices? If not what is it based upon? Sidvic

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  9. Tuition 8 times greater than inflation. But dont worry, you only need a masters for an entry level position!

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  10. I only take small solace that bacon has held the line.

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  11. So in relation to income everything is more expensive other than coffee, sugar, and milk!

    So consumers haven't won and workers have been screwed.

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  12. ...and the government of the carpetbaggers, government by the carpetbaggers and government for the carpetbaggers cannot reform itself because that would violate the rapacious nature of the carpetbaggers who comprise the current [B]Fe[/B]de[B]ral[/B] Government.

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  13. I notice the only green (drop) is all food. Bread and Circuses (free TV).
    With the added “benefit” of lower food profit compared to everything else hitting the family farmer more than the corporate ones...

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  14. But Vox, without globalization, our coffee would cost $7 instead of $1! You dont dislike immigration, you just hate coffee drinkers, dont you! Vox confirmed tea drinker.*

    *this post is satire.

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  15. There is no way this kind of debt / inflation ends peacefully

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  16. It's so obvious. Immigration is bad in every way. Here's 2 more negatives : environment and pandemics. How is adding millions ( ?60million since the 1965 immigration act) to the population good for the environment ? Millions more to feed ? Millions more to house? Urban sprawl ? Added infrastructure ie schools , roads , power plants ?? Millions more mean more pollution . On and on ...
    How is having millions of immigrants live, travel and chain migrate good for stopping contagious diseases ??

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  17. Okay, you're right, just let me sell this 100 yr old dump for 500k first

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  18. That income drop in real terms is astounding.

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  19. Some people, like Peter Brimelow, are pissed that Trump has not followed a nativist path and tried to pull more whites to his side of the aisle to win on Nov 3.

    However, it seems to me that such a strategy would be a losing strategy from the get-go given:

    A. How entrenched the tribe is in the #LyingMSM, and
    B. How many whites are cucked.

    I want Trump to win. Then we can start undoing the shit immigration and inflation has caused!

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  20. Yeah, but houses are way bigger and the cars are better.

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    1. That's something people forget. Grandad's GI Loan usually bought a <1200 square foot home.

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  21. There is plenty of land and resources to house, feed, and water Americans, even in an America bloated by millions of invaders.

    The bigger problem here is the anti-human green lobby, which rose thanks to selfish boomers who wanted their "local character" and "views" preserved without having to go through the trouble of actually paying for the land.

    The longer and more pervasive their grip on a given nation or state, the higher the house prices due to artificial supply constrictions.

    Of course, as the impact on house prices became crystal-clear, boomers chose to eat their young rather than reverse course: after all, they already bought in at the rates their forefathers had maintained for generations.

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  22. An oddity is that the instability facilitates the removal becoming a possibility. Being ready to facilitate the specifics, and to fill the void, provides the greatest utility. Especially as they won't fix themselves, and they won't leave power to go plant roses.

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  23. anti-White open borders: Jews
    Central Bank debt-bombing/money-manufacturing: Jews

    the core problem is: Jews.

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  24. And on a similar vein.
    https://oftwominds.cloudhostedresources.com/?ref=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.oftwominds.com%2Fblog.html&width=360

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  25. 16. The Homeless IT GuyOctober 29, 2020 4:10 PM
    There is no way this kind of debt / inflation ends peacefully


    Can you point to a debt default that ended violently? This is fairly common, it happens in Argentina every 10yrs... Remember the famous Weimar example happened in the early 1920's, WW2 didn't happen for another 16 years.

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  26. 13. OstarOctober 29, 2020 3:50 PM
    I notice the only green (drop) is all food.


    Same problem with the cars but opposite direction - the problem of quality. Nobody thinks the food we're eating is equal in quality to food in 1952. So how do you reasonably account for this in a CPI?

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  27. scimitar wrote:It's so obvious. Immigration is bad in every way. Here's 2 more negatives : environment and pandemics. How is adding millions ( ?60million since the 1965 immigration act) to the population good for the environment ? Millions more to feed ? Millions more to house? Urban sprawl ? Added infrastructure ie schools , roads , power plants ?? Millions more mean more pollution . On and on ...

    How is having millions of immigrants live, travel and chain migrate good for stopping contagious diseases ??


    Funny, in a not so funny way... that is about the number of children aborted. Or, last numbers I saw. Go figure.

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  28. I think we should follow the prime directive and send the low IQ peoples back to their points of origin. It seems only fair as True Americans seem to trigger all of these immigrants and make them feel bad.

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  29. Gas, if you factor out all the added taxes today, is almost certainly cheaper.

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  30. I prefer to measure this is gold, since gold is the only real measure of inflation.

    Gold was $35/oz in 1952. Gold is $1,866/oz today.

    Housing: Take 9,075/35 = 259 gold coins. 259*1866 = $483,827, which should be the current price of Housing.

    Income: ($6850/35)*1866 = $365,202, which should be the current income.

    Car: ($1754/35)*1866 = $93,513, which should be the current price of a car.

    Harvard Tuition: ($600/35)*1866 = $31,988, which should be the current Harvard tuition.

    I suspect the cost of medical care either follows or exceeds the gold price.

    What's the takeaway?

    1) Massive ground was lost for income, even more than stated, because of movement off of the gold standard.

    2) Advanced manufacturing, like housing and cars, cannot capture the historic value of their goods, despite advances in technology. This is actually consistent with inflationary conditions, where intellectual output is devalued over time. This goes for even commodities like food, which uses advanced technology to produce it, but cannot capture its historic value because of inflation.

    3) Items with inelastic demand can meet or exceed inflation. Harvard, because of status, and medicine, because of survival, can meet or exceed the dollar price of gold over time.



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  31. OT

    Hallelujah!

    I sent via Paypal the entire amount for the construction of the orphanage. Thank you to those contributing on behalf of the kids.

    Praise Jesus! What a mighty God we serve.

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  32. crescent wrench wrote:The longer and more pervasive their grip on a given nation or state, the higher the house prices due to artificial supply constrictions.
    That's a real problem, and there are probably places like San Francisco where it's the biggest part of the local problem, but financialization, two income households and unconstrained immigration are the main causes for the housing bubble.

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  33. The car prices are ridiculous. And it's because the sheep will pay it and brainlessly think the price simply is what it is. They also need to keep up with the Joneses so to speak. You can save fortunes by overhauling an old car, putting fuel injection in ones that lack it, get nearly comparable fuel efficiency and not be a debt slave. By overhaul o mean engine and transmission, not some 80k plus boomer chalkline/concourse classic restoration. America is practically a Camaro graveyard and Chevy parts are the cheapest.

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  34. I'd be rich if I had my current salary at 1952 prices.

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  35. Crew wrote:B. How many whites are cucked.

    The percentage of liberal white guys who can't afford to be cucked will vote for Trump.

    They are the ones showing up at Trump rallies.

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  36. Steve Canyon wrote:There's a lot more stuff that goes into a 2020 Chevy than a 52 Chevy. That has to account for part of the increase in car prices.

    More stuff = more stuff to break. You don't need a mechanic with a computer to fix a 52 Chevy @ $100/hr.

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  37. My grandfather made 15 grand in 1952, those must have been great times.

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  38. It's almost comical to go onto an Urbanist website and, in the inevitable discussion about "the affordable housing crisis", point out that no US city with such a crisis has a birth rate above replacement, so all the growth destabilizing the local housing market is people who moved there from somewhere else.

    No comprehension. And to the minimal extent they do comprehend, they get mad and call you a bigot because you don't want to make sacrifices to your way of life in order to accommodate hordes from somewhere else.

    Of course, that's because they're part of the horde. Locusts, perpetually drifting from place to place, stripping it of resources until it can no longer support them, then migrating on to the next place.

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  39. Debt and Immigration is inextricably linked. Since Fractional Reserve Banking, alongside the Federal Reserve System can never pay for itself.

    It must borrow more and more to keep the Ponzi scheme going.

    And since more and more borrowers are required. Immigration must constantly accelerate ad infinitum:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awiNN67DeOs

    This is the "Economic" reason behind immigration. More bodies to prevent the collapse of the Ponzi Scheme.

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  40. Steve Canyon wrote:There's a lot more stuff that goes into a 2020 Chevy than a 52 Chevy. That has to account for part of the increase in car prices. why? the cost of radios and cameras is dropping every year, if not for destructive government market distortions they would be ridiculously cheap, already the options don't cost squat, they are gimmicks in a market with no competition, a new willys jeep(not street legal) is between 4 and 6 k. all the nice stuff modern cars have couldn't add 2k to it, and no reason a modern car model has to cost over 15k and it would still have 95 percent of what a new kitted tahoe comes with, cars are expensive because they are made by an industry with regulated ossification. No difference between communist cars and FREE MARKET TM cars that have to comply with 5 billion pages of regulation. Why does anyone pretend that value-changes in products means anything for inflation? it doesn't, it is subjective and will never be truthfully measured, so don't pretend it isn't a load of commie bs, A car has 4 wheels, and gets you where you want to go, the massage seats don't factor into inflation, and they don't cost X real dollars to make, they cost X imperial dollars in the auto cartel to buy, Huge difference getting ever bigger. Why no 6000 dollar F-150? because no nuclear steal production, plus millions of government bureaucrats screwing America up for a century. value adjustment is always fraud.

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  41. 33. mapOctober 29, 2020 5:45 PM
    I prefer to measure this is gold, since gold is the only real measure of inflation.


    I like where your head is, but measuring a commodity by a commodity can be tricky, particularly a commodity like gold. Try copper, or timber, or natural gas, or silk, you get a very different picture. "But silk has a cyclic value based on fashion" you say - yes but so does gold, and I would say gold is VERY fashionable right now. I bought my gold 10yrs ago for, I think, $950/oz with the markup. It flies in the face of reality to say prices have gone up nearly 100% in 10yrs.

    Even silver, gold's little brother, would give you a very different picture of inflation, silver being 10% or so DOWN over the last 10yrs.

    There is no single object to "fix" the value of other objects against, or rather, for every man that "fixed" object is different, and different for every man in different situations. Hence the age-old arguments about not being able to eat gold.

    But overall it is a GOOD idea not to look at things solely measured by imperial credits, particularly when eying new discretionary purchases.

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  42. 37. JacobOctober 29, 2020 6:13 PM
    I'd be rich if I had my current salary at 1952 prices.


    I recently reached a milestone for salary and adjusted it for inflation to when I started my career in 2003. Needless to say, I was less impressed with myself...

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  43. Doktor Jeep wrote:The car prices are ridiculous. And it's because the sheep will pay it and brainlessly think the price simply is what it is. They also need to keep up with the Joneses so to speak. You can save fortunes by overhauling an old car, putting fuel injection in ones that lack it, get nearly comparable fuel efficiency and not be a debt slave. By overhaul o mean engine and transmission, not some 80k plus boomer chalkline/concourse classic restoration. America is practically a Camaro graveyard and Chevy parts are the cheapest.

    If it were not for all the government regulation with safety and emissions, a good argument can be made that even the lowest end sedan for around $16k is almost on par with inflation for a Model T that Ford produced for years. This car has comfort, reliability, air conditioning, relatively long lasting though I think the manufacturers now get consumers on the peripheral stuff like struts, replacing a front end, and other stuff designed to fail.

    Since cars are more expensive to repair albeit safer, insurance has gone up and become a 'necessity' forced upon us by government.

    I'm driving 12 year old vehicles now but had to put some maintenance into them. If I can get my situation better I might consider seeing if I can find some early 2000's grandma cars since these vehicles are wearing out.

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  44. If i were a dairy farmer i'd switch livestock and rear students, following the Harvard model.

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  45. Ominous Cowherd wrote:crescent wrench wrote:The longer and more pervasive their grip on a given nation or state, the higher the house prices due to artificial supply constrictions.

    That's a real problem, and there are probably places like San Francisco where it's the biggest part of the local problem, but financialization, two income households and unconstrained immigration are the main causes for the housing bubble.


    Not just in major cities, all the way into the burbs and even rural areas.
    The more "green" influence a state has the worse the housing index is (and the more red, the easier homes are on the pocketbook)

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  46. What is missing is the "automation" factor. In 1952 a farmer did well producing 80 bushels of corn per acre or 75 bales of hey per acre per cutting. Today's farmer produces almost twice that for much corn for less than the inflation cost of the 52 corn crop. A 125 bales every 4 weeks is on the low end. Round baling is the rage as it is cheaper and the wrapped bales that ferment is premium at dairy's.

    Bacon just got lucky. Back in 1979 I had just graduated high school and had about 50 hogs. My Grandpa told me to sell out as the hog market was going to hit rock bottom. I sold out for $1.73 a pound and 6 months later it was half that.

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  47. Doktor Jeep wrote:You can save fortunes by overhauling an old car, putting fuel injection in ones that lack it, get nearly comparable fuel efficiency and not be a debt slave. By overhaul o mean engine and transmission, not some 80k plus boomer chalkline/concourse classic restoration. America is practically a Camaro graveyard and Chevy parts are the cheapest.

    Any good tutorials/books on this subject? I still have a 1995 Saturn in running order, and I love the idea of retrofitting an otherwise usable old car. I, certainly, have no need to keep up with the Joneses!

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  48. One of the major takeaways I got was that the current measurement is for household income, not individual income. If you measure two people, it's about the same now as one back then. Everything is lies, everything is deceit.

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  49. And let's not forget that costs throughout supply of these items have been jacked up by compliance and regulation costs too. Cars being a big one, and administration (indirectly encouraged by debt) at colleges being another.

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  50. Every opportunity an immigrant takes, is an opportunity the native population can not take.

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  51. this is what i've been trying to point out when i reference things like automobile racing and the like;
    expenses are skyrocketing relative to purses. you can watch a 1930s movie about sprint car racing like 'To Please A Lady' and notice several things such as:
    a - the purse from a single race would be more than sufficient to purchase a competitive car to run IN that race if you won
    b - purses even in the 1930s sound decent even by today's standards. adjusted for inflation, 6 figure purses should almost be a monthly occurrence at every track in the country. instead, tracks are dying everywhere.

    yes, insurance and other costs for the tracks have skyrocketed.

    yes, kids aren't being taught how to work on and drive cars, so the audience is declining as the fans age into the cemetery.

    but the fact remains, that there is NO WHERE near as much money available in purses relative to expenses as there used too be.


    8. Unknown October 29, 2020 3:28 PM
    If not what is it based upon? Sidvic



    housing and fuel prices are specifically excluded from the CPI Inflation index ... so, of course, that's where they hide a bunch of the real inflation.

    they're raking a bunch of money off into the stock markets as well.


    VD:
    is there a link to the source for this graph or did you build it yourself?

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  52. Years ago gasoline was more expensive than now. Someone noted then that in some year long past you could buy a gallon of gas for 20 cents. They noted that if you still had those two silver dimes you could still buy a gallon of gas.

    Also, around 1970 it took X hours of min wage work to pay for 1 sem credit at a state university. Now it takes 7 times that number.

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  53. 5 @Azimus - Cars tend to last longer these days both in years and mileage. As a former owner of the Chevy Sprint (which turned into the Geo), I would never buy one of those today because I can do better for the same money.

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  54. What this country needs is a good 5 cent nickel.

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  55. Debt and immigration are trailing indicators, pneumonia bacteria feeding upon virus-destroyed tissues.

    The primary causes are:

    1) Codified thievery. (Many like to point to 1913 as the date where everything went wrong, but the rot is far older, and saw results almost immediately.)

    2) Selective enforcement of the law. It's why they make so many. They get to bugger kids, while you're harassed decades after kissing a girl in a high-school photo.

    To destroy any civilization, all that is needed is an enshrined excuse to steal that steadily grows until it has engulfed all of society and corrupted the citizenry with incessant appeals to malicious envy.

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  56. >> OT
    >> Hallelujah!
    >> I sent via Paypal the entire amount for the construction of the orphanage.


    Now remember, once it's built, to keep the pedos out.

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  57. Immigration has always been a bad, bad thing for a country. Allowing the boomer world view of civic nationalism to remain pervasive will only continue to cause not only financial harm, but societal decay as a whole. Trump will win again because of these issues.

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  58. ZeroHedge has had several articles over the years documenting the massive quantity of new cars that are intentionally held from the market every year because they don't sell at crazy current prices and they won't put them on the market, ever, because to do so would cause the inflated prices of new cars to crater. Instead, they are quite literally put to pasture and left to rot away. In aggregate across the entire industry, it's tens or hundreds of thousands (or more) of cars per year! The pictures are shocking. They can't even recycle them. Cars should be much cheaper.

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  59. Azimus wrote:I like where your head is, but measuring a commodity by a commodity can be tricky, particularly a commodity like gold. Try copper, or timber, or natural gas, or silk, you get a very different picture. "But silk has a cyclic value based on fashion" you say - yes but so does gold, and I would say gold is VERY fashionable right now.

    You can't use timber, or copper, natural gas, or silk...these items are consumable. They are used, and then they have to be mined, drilled or grown again for additional applications. The long term value of any of these items is zero.

    Gold is money and it is a stable unit of account. IOW, gold's value is constant. What is being measured is the value of the currency denominated in it. When gold climbed from $35/oz to $1,866/oz, that measured the level of inflation in the US dollar accumulated over time. In fact, most of the dollar inflation was accumulated from 2009 to the present.

    Silver can be used, but it is 10 times more abundant than gold and subject to periodic supply shocks...see, Comstock Lode.

    A Bretton-Woods style gold standard is something necessary to return to.

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  60. Doktor Jeep wrote:By overhaul o mean engine and transmission, not some 80k plus boomer chalkline/concourse classic restoration. America is practically a Camaro graveyard and Chevy parts are the cheapest.

    I've been lurking on websites and youtube channels where people engine swap Chevy V8's into various cars: Mustangs, Miatas, Jaguars, older Chevy's etc.

    This is the usual GM LS V8 that was introduced in 1997. Very cool idea...and, from my impression, prohibitively expensive.

    Sure, you can get a junkyard 5.3L for $500-$1200, but then spend thousands on the kits to adapt it.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gDMrJhpeYiE

    This guy did a build himself, because he is a trained mechanic in his own shop and it cost him $45,000.

    What swaps are you referring to?

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  61. The two primary tools used by our Promethean scammers.

    No wonder the conventional doctrine completely ignores both.

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  62. I'm beginning to think it's time for American nationalists to take over the Democrat Party as the inevitable where do we go from here conversation starts for them.

    Trump has turned the Republican Party into a civic nationalist party, which is a step forward but still rooted in a lie. Socialist empire of diversity has proven to be toxic even to many minority members. America First has captured the male vote of Latinos and Blacks more than anything Republicans have done for decades.

    So winning the entire White vote would be the goal with the takeover. Trump Jr. is probably running, and will probably keep his dad's idealism going.

    But the only way actual nationalists can get in power, at this point, is to seize the Democrat Party in its state of weakness before the Satanic vermin can figure something out that works.

    A new Democrat Party ought to focus on Christianity, ending debt slavery, and fundamentally transforming immigration policy into emigration policy, so that members of various foreign nations can voluntarily self-repatriate before the ugly part comes with military-led repatriation of hostile domestic resident nations.

    Rhetorically, the strongest approach would be to say that what needs to be done is not comfortable but it's the truth. And it is.

    A national party in America tells the truth in an empire of lies.

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  63. @65 If you want to swap on a budget, you cannot be catalog kit fag.

    You have to fabricate most or all of it yourself, and stay away from the high dollar whiz-bang catalog stuff.

    You can build a 400hp LS motor for well under $5k if you do the work yourself and only buy the things you MUST have.

    Hell, if you're totally unable to do any motor work at all, GM sells a damned crate motor for circle track racing that makes 400hp for like $8k shipped to your door.

    You can always substitute skill and determination for dollars spent, it's just a matter of how hard you want to work and how much you're willing to learn along the way.

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  64. 64. mapOctober 30, 2020 12:28 AM
    You can't use timber, or copper, natural gas, or silk...these items are consumable.


    Good point.

    The long term value of any of these items is zero.

    After they are consumed, you mean? I doubt that would be very convincing on the commodity trading floor "give me a ton of copper for free because it will eventually be consumed." Yes, but if it hasn't been consumed it has value.

    Gold is money and it is a stable unit of account. IOW, gold's value is constant.

    In a world where it is declared to have constant value, it will have constant value, because it becomes the 'fixed' commodity by which all other products are denominated. But we don't live in that world. If it were true, any product or group of products in the CPI basket would have a fixed ratio vs gold over any timeframe. This is demonstrably not true.

    Silver can be used, but it is 10 times more abundant than gold and subject to periodic supply shocks...see, Comstock Lode.

    Supply shock, demand shock, doesn't matter. Price flexes for all products - gold, guns, or grain.

    A Bretton-Woods style gold standard is something necessary to return to.

    I agree completely. Fixing 'money' to ANY physical commodity is superior to fixing it to the whims of a parcel of warlocks waging financial war on whomever it pleases them to wage war on. Gold is the traditional commodity and would be fine.

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  65. The Lab Manager wrote:I'm driving 12 year old vehicles now but had to put some maintenance into them. If I can get my situation better I might consider seeing if I can find some early 2000's grandma cars since these vehicles are wearing out.
    My vehicles are 30 to 40 years old. Rigs from the '80s are probably the sweet spot for build quality versus easy to work on. Modern parts can upgrade the quality of the older rigs, too.

    If you're willing and able to fix them yourself, you can drive for around $1,000 per year average cost, counting upfront and ongoing parts cost. This year I've spent about $10,000 on engine and transmission for one $2,000 pickup. I'll drive that with no major work for the next 20 years. I have another one that I paid $4,000 for that has another decade of use left in it before I have to do that, but that one was a divorce sale. Usually that condition costs more.

    Find a make, model and era that works for you, get the manuals and the tools to keep them running, become an expert in them, have some parts cars.

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  66. @9 "But don't worry, you only need a masters for an entry-level position! "

    Plus seven years of experience with a a programming language that was only invented three years ago...

    No prob.

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  67. @41 "Of course, that's because they're part of the horde. Locusts, perpetually drifting from place to place, stripping it of resources until it can no longer support them, then migrating on to the next place."

    Or as we often describe them: r-selected.

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  68. Ominous Cowherd wrote:Tl;dr version: your government hates you and wants you to die, so they can replace you.
    This is the most direct and succinct way to put it.

    Unknown wrote:Isn't this a bit circular as the inflation calculation is based on the rise in consumer prices? If not what is it based upon?
    Yes, it is a bit self-referential to use USD for the comparison. A better standard of measure might be to use a "ounces of Gold" pricing, but even that might be a bit distorted in the "paper" vs "physical" interplay.

    B-Rex wrote:Tuition 8 times greater than inflation. But dont worry, you only need a masters for an entry level position!
    This.
    It's disgusting, as are the "new normal" of requiring 10 to 15 years of experience for an entry-level job.

    Crew wrote:I want Trump to win. Then we can start undoing the shit immigration and inflation has caused!
    As our host said "Any program or policy that does not directly address those two problems, or remove those responsible for creating those two problems from influence, will fail.", and there is very little Trump has done on these two fronts. The simple reality here is that "undoing the shit immigration and inflation has caused" will never happen until the illegals are either repatriated or killed, and the debt problem will never be addressed until government values Justice for reasons that would be too lengthy for a comment.

    Dont Worry About Me wrote:A new Democrat Party ought to focus on Christianity, ending debt slavery, and fundamentally transforming immigration policy into emigration policy, so that members of various foreign nations can voluntarily self-repatriate before the ugly part comes with military-led repatriation of hostile domestic resident nations.
    Rhetorically, the strongest approach would be to say that what needs to be done is not comfortable but it's the truth. And it is.
    A national party in America tells the truth in an empire of lies.

    The need for Truth in government reminds me of this article.

    Ominous Cowherd wrote:The Lab Manager wrote:I'm driving 12 year old vehicles now but had to put some maintenance into them. If I can get my situation better I might consider seeing if I can find some early 2000's grandma cars since these vehicles are wearing out.

    My vehicles are 30 to 40 years old. Rigs from the '80s are probably the sweet spot for build quality versus easy to work on. Modern parts can upgrade the quality of the older rigs, too.

    If you're willing and able to fix them yourself, you can drive for around $1,000 per year average cost, counting upfront and ongoing parts cost. This year I've spent about $10,000 on engine and transmission for one $2,000 pickup. I'll drive that with no major work for the next 20 years. I have another one that I paid $4,000 for that has another decade of use left in it before I have to do that, but that one was a divorce sale. Usually that condition costs more.

    Find a make, model and era that works for you, get the manuals and the tools to keep them running, become an expert in them, have some parts cars.

    I'm a fan of the `80s Oldsmobile.

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  69. OneWingedShark wrote:As our host said "Any program or policy that does not directly address those two problems, or remove those responsible for creating those two problems from influence, will fail.", and there is very little Trump has done on these two fronts.
    We keep hoping that all this so far has been prelude, and that he will eventually take some meaningful actions.

    So far, he has built most of a wall, and he has hamstrung the H1B program, and he has made the US look much more unwelcoming to outsiders, and he has done wonders for Americans doing business in America, so the tendency is good, even if it's weak.

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  70. Regarding cars and prices:

    Most of the regs governing vehicles apply to giant manufacturers. If two out of three of the dinosaurs had been allowed to die, we consumers might have choices like England does. The Ariel Atom, 20,000 pounds. Even TVRs are borderline affordable. The original Lotus Elise was the same sticker price as the Miata. Cottage manufacturing can work.

    We were robbed, literally at gunpoint, of those options.

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  71. OneWingedShark wrote:I'm a fan of the `80s Oldsmobile.
    I used to drive an early '80s Olds diesel wagon. It was great, as long as we could keep head gaskets in it.

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  72. 65. map October 30, 2020 12:36 AM
    This guy did a build himself, because he is a trained mechanic in his own shop and it cost him $45,000.


    that better be a 2,000 HP motor or that's the dumbest mechanic you've ever seen.

    custom motor / transmission mounts and a custom drive shaft aren't more than $500.

    LS swaps are popular BECAUSE THEY ARE CHEAP and make boat loads of power. people are slapping turbos on junk yard motors with no rebuild and pulling +700HP.

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  73. Those numbers are different in my region. That $300K+ house? Generally, only for 2-earner, college+ couples, with 2 or fewer children. Not for the average person.
    The price of groceries wildly fluctuates, and food purchases are adjusted to buy sale items.
    What has changed significantly is the money NOT being spent on eating out. Most people are eating at home, mostly, or - occasionally, getting takeout.
    Few vacations, few theme parks, few movies. So, the "We're deserving of $15/hour for unskilled labor" group is unemployed, and may be for some time. The Hollywood cronies are getting desperate. The travel industry is ready to shoot themselves.
    Wait until Trump's new order, reclassifying many of the Deep State as being in jobs setting policy, and, therefore, fireable at will. They'll start throwing themselves into traffic.

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  74. CoolHand wrote:You can build a 400hp LS motor for well under $5k if you do the work yourself and only buy the things you MUST have.

    Hell, if you're totally unable to do any motor work at all, GM sells a damned crate motor for circle track racing that makes 400hp for like $8k shipped to your door.


    I don't see where these Youtube guys are getting their expenses. Heck, you don;t need a circle track motor. You can get an E-rod LS crate motor at 400 HP for $6700, or the connect-and cruise system with a tranmission, ECU, wiring harness, pretty much plug and play for $15,000. K-members are not that expensive. So, I am not seeing where the expense is coming from unless there is something to do with fuel pumps, custom fabrication or what not.

    Then again, here is a list of costs for this build:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qy0X3X2B4Lk&t=656s

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  75. furor kek tonicus ( my feelings don't care about your facts ) wrote:LS swaps are popular BECAUSE THEY ARE CHEAP and make boat loads of power. people are slapping turbos on junk yard motors with no rebuild and pulling +700HP.

    I know. I keep hearing that.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qy0X3X2B4Lk&t=656s

    Here's what it cost to do an LS swap into a Mazda Miata.

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  76. Azimus wrote:Gold is money and it is a stable unit of account. IOW, gold's value is constant.

    In a world where it is declared to have constant value, it will have constant value, because it becomes the 'fixed' commodity by which all other products are denominated. But we don't live in that world. If it were true, any product or group of products in the CPI basket would have a fixed ratio vs gold over any timeframe. This is demonstrably not true.


    See Jastram, the economist that did the definitive study of gold as a monetary constant.

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  77. Since income has only risen 0.5x of inflation all the other numbers are twice as bas as they look.

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