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Monday, October 15, 2012

Introducing Arts of Dark and Light

the novella featuring LodiIt hasn't exactly been any great mystery, but I am happy to finally be able to share exactly what I've been up to for the last year.  Last summer, after finishing A Dance with Dragons, I found myself deeply disappointed with what Mr. Martin, whose earlier work in the series I so enjoyed, had produced after making us all wait six years.  "Good Lord, even I could do better than that", I thought, which may not, strictly speaking, actually be true, but regardless, that was the thought that struck me after slogging through 1,100 pages of tedious river journeys, Tyrion "humorously" falling off pigs, and being subjected to Important New Characters for approximately the 4,853rd time.  Being somewhat despondent about George Martin's descent into Robert Jordan territory, I turned to other so-called epic writers, including Joe Abercrombie, R. Scott Bakker, Steve Erikson, Daniel Abraham, and Brandon Sanderson.  Some of their books were quite good, others somewhat less so, but in no case did any of them provide me with that same sense of EPIC and wanting to experience the depths of the world that Martin presented so effectively in the first three books of A Song of Ice and Fire.

So, I decided that I would write an epic novel and I would do it in one year.  It would be the same length as A Game of Thrones, it would be loosely based upon an interesting period in military history, (in case you didn't realize it, the Wars of the Roses are the starting point for Martin's series, Stark = York and Lannister = Lancaster), and its focus would be on story, world, and character.  Nothing else.  No cleverness, no preaching, no subtexts, no reinventing wheels, no larger lessons, no deep philosophical insights.  In reading all the various would-be epics, I realized that most of them suffered from trying to do more than simply tell a fascinating story, which was also a problem with most of my previously published fiction.  I assumed I would self-publish it, since obviously no one would want to publish such a monster, and I would set it in the world of Summa Elvetica since I rather liked that world, as did most of those who read that flawed, but interesting failure of an esoteric literary exercise.  However, to do so, I needed to get the permission of Marcher Lord Press, the publisher of Summa, and much to my surprise, Jeff not only loved the idea of an epic series set in Selenoth, he insisted that he would publish it, even if it turned out to be more than 1,000 pages.

Umberto Eco once said that he wrote The Name of the Rose because he wanted to murder a monk.  I decided to do him one better and begin by killing the Holy Father.  That sets the stage for a story that is large and sprawling and is inspired by the Roman Social War, which is a little known quasi-civil war that was arguably the most perilous situation the Roman Republic faced in between the Gauls laying siege to the Capitoline Hill in 390 BC and Caesar crossing the Rubicon.  Amorr isn't Rome, of course, but the historical scenario provides the novel with a certain amount of structural verisimilitude that I have often found to be lacking in other books.

So, I'm very pleased to announce A THRONE OF BONES, the first novel in the series entitled Arts of Dark and Light, which will be published by Marcher Lord Press on December 1, 2012.  We're not sure of the final page count yet, but at 295,000 words, I expect it to be well over 750 pages.  It will be available for $4.99 in ebook format and $34.99 in hardcover.  There will be no paperbacks, trade or mass-market.  Marcher Lord is accepting preorders for the hardcovers starting today; those who preorder will pay only $29.99 for the hardcover and they will also receive the ebook on December 1st.  (We can't say precisely when the hardcovers will ship, except that it is expected to arrive with time to spare for Christmas.)  This preorder offer will be run from October 15th until November 30th.  Also, since I wanted to provide those who are potentially interested in the book a less esoteric introduction to the world of Selenoth than the one provided by Summa Elvetica, I am pleased to announce the publication today of A MAGIC BROKEN, which is a 50-page novella featuring two of the perspective characters from the novel.

A MAGIC BROKEN is available from Amazon for 99 cents and the reviews to date are mostly positive.  If you think you might be interested in A Throne of Bones, I would encourage giving the novella a whirl in the meantime.  Here are a few of the comments from the first reviewers:
  • "a sword and sorcery tale with a cerebral bent"
  • "the two main characters are likable in their non-perfection"
  • "an entertaining, fast paced read"
  • "I found the story line to be unpredictable"
  • "The environment and characters are on par with the best of George R.R. Martin"
  • "Despite the number of twists it remains coherent and believable as they unfold"
  • "a masterful act of guile and misdirection reminiscent of the style of Umberto Eco" 
  • "The world has a depth not found in much writing today." 
  • "the promise of it all leading somewhere grand and exciting is what interests me more than anything else"
Also, and I would argue this is a strong point in its favor, there are no river journeys, no "amusing" porcine-related pratfalls, and no whining.  Actually, come to think of it, there is a little whining, but rest assured that the whiner speedily meets with a literary device that I devoutly wish Robert Jordan had utilized with regards to his character Rand al'Thor at an early stage in The Wheel of Time.  In my opinion, Chapter One would have been about right.

Thanks are in order to JartStar, who created the cover for A Magic Broken and may even do the map for A Throne of Bones if I ever get my act together and get him the information he needs, as well as Jamsco, whose determined interest in Lodi not only inspired the novella, but his inclusion in the larger work as well.  Thanks to Markku and the Original Cyberpunk, who between them made my foray into ebooks viable and without whom these books would never have been conceived.  I also appreciate the reviewers, 15 20 of whom managed to read the novella and post their reviews over the weekend.  I'm very appreciative of Kirk DouPounce, who somehow managed to surpass the very high standard he'd set with Summa - about which more later - of Jeff Gerke of Marcher Lord, who was enthusiastic about taking on yet another ludicrous literary risk, and most of all, of Spacebunny and her encouragement of my efforts.

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87 Comments:

Anonymous CJ October 15, 2012 9:13 AM  

Congratulations Vox. I'll go ahead and second your shout out to Jamsco, since Lodi was the most interesting character in the novella, IMO.

I normally don't read anything over 700 pages that isn't written by Dostoevsky, but after reading the novella, I may give it a try.

Anonymous Stephen J. October 15, 2012 9:24 AM  

Woohoo! I greatly enjoyed Summa Elvetica, so I'm in. (Probably have to cough up for the hardcover, though, as I've yet to meet the e-reader I could physically stand to use.)

Anonymous Josh October 15, 2012 9:24 AM  

Congrats, Vox.

Should we expect a similar range of races as summa?

Anonymous TLM October 15, 2012 9:25 AM  

Congrats on the work. Fantasy isn't my thing , but glad to hear you're doing your part to keep the Jar Jar Binks types of characters out of the publishing world. If only Lucas had used you for screen writing Episode 1.

Anonymous FUBAR Nation (Ben) October 15, 2012 9:33 AM  

The books sounds awesome. I take it that the series is going to contain 7 books, just like what Martin plans to do?

Regardless, Rand wasn't the worst character. I can't understand your beef with Rand, except for the part where he didn't accept the amazon warriors going to battle for him.

Anonymous Vidad October 15, 2012 9:34 AM  

Bravo!

Blogger Conan the Cimmerian October 15, 2012 9:40 AM  

Congratulations.

Anonymous Kyle In Japan October 15, 2012 9:41 AM  

Great news. I'm about to head off to bed but I got the novella and I'll read it tomorrow. At first I was disappointed that you were staying in the fairly conventional fantasy world of Summa, which even thought I liked that book, was fairly conventional with dwarves, elves, and the like. However, the ancient Roman and Byzantine influences sound very interesting and definitely a step off the beaten path.

As someone writing my own big fantasy epic (current around the 400-page mark after less than four months of writing, aiming to finish the first draft by the end of this year and then start choppin'), your advice about staying focused on story, world, and characters is well noted.

While I think the first three books of Ice and Fire are ultimately better, I am unembarrassed to admit that I was having a lot more *fun* by the end of Sanderson's Hero Of Ages than anything else I've read in recent memory.

Blogger Joshua_D October 15, 2012 9:45 AM  

Congrats, Vox. I haven't read Summa, but I'll be buying these two. I'm grateful for all the information and conversations you promote via the blog, so it's the least I could do. :) Also, +1 on the artwork, on both covers.

Anonymous Daniel October 15, 2012 9:58 AM  

I am amused that you take such pains to assert the "No cleverness, no preaching, no subtexts, no reinventing wheels, no larger lessons, no deep philosophical insights..."

...And then remind us all that Umberto Eco was just trying to write a detective story.

Fella, you can't write a blog post about WoW without clever subtextual preaching, and larger, reinvented wheels. Coming from the man who wrote dance music on the subject of the eschaton - Yeah, I think the deep philosophy's going to be there, if only on rhythm guitar.

Strict adherence to form and story as a bulwark against artless braining is an absolutely rare and noble goal. I'm glad you adopted it, just as much as I look forward to its occasional failure.

Anonymous JI October 15, 2012 9:59 AM  

Congratulations, Vox. This is very impressive. Can't wait to buy it.

Anonymous Josh October 15, 2012 10:04 AM  

Wherefore art thy were seals?

Anonymous jay c October 15, 2012 10:06 AM  

Congratulations! It's on my to-read list.

Anonymous VD October 15, 2012 10:14 AM  

Fella, you can't write a blog post about WoW without clever subtextual preaching, and larger, reinvented wheels. Coming from the man who wrote dance music on the subject of the eschaton - Yeah, I think the deep philosophy's going to be there, if only on rhythm guitar.

That was the OC's point when I first discussed the idea of the book with him. It's also the basis for my thoughts concerning those who will dismiss it as a cheap Martin knock-off on the basis of the size and title. It's a fair question, but unlike Terry Brooks with Tolkiein, I don't think I could successfully rip-off Martin even if I wanted to, because I don't think anything like the man. And I don't want to.

I look at it more as an attempt to combine the influences of Martin and Tolkien.

Blogger Giraffe October 15, 2012 10:20 AM  

I can't wait to read it.

Blogger Fred October 15, 2012 10:21 AM  

I just hope its not filthy like Game of Thrones. After watching that you need a bath and an hour in prayer with the KJV. Better, dont watch it all.

Knowing VOX im sure it will be pure as the driven snow. This is a good thing.

Anonymous VD October 15, 2012 10:24 AM  

I just hope its not filthy like Game of Thrones.

I would go so far as to say that it is MORE realistic than Martin in that respect. I always found it highly peculiar that about the only people NOT having sex in his books are those who are married to each other.

Anonymous Stingray October 15, 2012 10:46 AM  

Love the cover.

Blogger Markku October 15, 2012 10:49 AM  

Wherefore [sic] art thy were seals?

They lie upon yon chick-lit shelf.

Anonymous Noah B. October 15, 2012 10:49 AM  

This does sound exciting. I haven't read any fiction in years but I will be reading this one.

Anonymous AJ October 15, 2012 10:57 AM  

As one of the early reviewers, I enjoyed the novella a lot!
Prompted me to immediately buy Summa Elvetica as well over the weekend, and it was really cool to read about Lodi again, plus the world setting is fascinating to me and I can't wait for A Throne of Bones, really excited to see where this is going!

Anonymous Josh October 15, 2012 11:00 AM  

I would go so far as to say that it is MORE realistic than Martin in that respect. I always found it highly peculiar that about the only people NOT having sex in his books are those who are married to each other.

Given the armies of whores that traditionally follow armies, I suppose one could make the argument that including them adds to the realism. Of course soldiers had to defecate as well, but I don't recall ever seeing an argument that the lack of toilet scenes detracted from a story.

Anonymous Josh October 15, 2012 11:02 AM  

They lie upon yon chick-lit shelf.

It is the east, and Stephanie Meyers is the sun!

Anonymous Anonymous October 15, 2012 11:03 AM  

Can't wait to read both of them. Is the ebook version also going to available on Dec 1st or will it be available sooner?

Blogger RobertT October 15, 2012 11:05 AM  

While I thought you failed to develop some promising story lines in Summa, I think "flawed" is too strong a word. I have probably read 200 books since I read Summa and there was something about that book that stuck with me more than any of the others. Why, I'm not sure, but it may have been the concept. One of the reviewers said what he enjoyed most about the novella the expectation it was leading to something big. It may have been that.

Anonymous Vidad October 15, 2012 11:11 AM  

"I don't recall ever seeing an argument that the lack of toilet scenes detracted from a story."

Coming soon: Alaric's Outhouse

Anonymous VD October 15, 2012 11:12 AM  

Is the ebook version also going to available on Dec 1st or will it be available sooner?

The ebook will be available on Dec 1st. The hardcover should start arriving to those who ordered it within a week or two of that. The original goal was to make sure people could get the books by Christmas and we're working towards that.

Amazon has really sped up their process. I signed off on the last corrections on Oct 8th, and the book was already listed for sale the very next day. That's how we were able to have the early reviews show up on the official day of release, which is today. I find this astonishing, especially when only fifteen years ago, I had to wait two years to see TWIH in print after turning in the manuscript.

Blogger Markku October 15, 2012 11:14 AM  

Once at school we had to write a short story about nothing. (The same way Seinfeld is about nothing.) I wrote about the lack of a toilet scene, when a toilet scene would have been appropriate, and of the pains thereof. Based on true events. Got an A.

Blogger Markku October 15, 2012 11:22 AM  

I feel a sic in the air...

Even canis canem edit, so why is it so damned hard for Blogger to do?

Anonymous Azimus October 15, 2012 11:26 AM  

So what is the new course for the good ship VD?

Anonymous Timothy October 15, 2012 11:27 AM  

This is so awesome! Sounds even better than I imagined & in time for Christmas too. Keep it up Vox!

Anonymous Randy M October 15, 2012 11:35 AM  

Yes, please on the map!
(And I just posted my review)

Blogger Markku October 15, 2012 11:35 AM  

As for Martin, taking that many books to start sucking is a great feat. Usually it's the third one. Quoting Neill Cumpston:

George Lucas had Star Wars, and then Empire Kicks Ass, and then all of a sudden it’s Planet of Furry Faggoty Fuckheads.

Anonymous bw1 October 15, 2012 12:00 PM  

I'd really like to see a paperback. It makes it so much easier to give away after reading, thus introducing a new reader.

Anonymous Crispy October 15, 2012 12:04 PM  

Congratulations Vox! Looking forward to enjoying both.

Anonymous JartStar October 15, 2012 12:08 PM  

Yes, please on the map!

Besides Vox having a large to-do list and the map being somewhere on it, the biggest challenge is that I think spatially and he thinks logically about locations.

Anonymous Cinco October 15, 2012 12:14 PM  

Congrats VD.

Anonymous Stickwick October 15, 2012 12:14 PM  

That's great, Vox. Quite an achievement. And the new cover is very impressive.

Anonymous AXCrom October 15, 2012 12:14 PM  

I was not expecting to actually laugh aloud, but the following was pure VD:

"Staggering slightly, he let the other man help him to his feet. Quadras Aetias was a tall, lean man with a bald head and a bony face. Everything about his elegant demeanor suggested the banker, not the whoremaster. But was there really a difference, in the end?"

Anonymous Feh October 15, 2012 12:21 PM  

$4.99 -- Each penny buys you almost 600 words!

I trust that in this work of fantasy, good and evil are palpably distinct? No floundering in the swamps of nihilism and moral relativism?

Anonymous Adam October 15, 2012 12:51 PM  

I thoroughly enjoyed A Magic Broken and am looking forward to A Throne of Bones.

Anonymous FUBAR Nation (Ben) October 15, 2012 12:56 PM  

I'm really thinking of buying the book. My only concern is this: Is there any vampires or werewolves in it? If there are, count me out.

Anonymous aviendha October 15, 2012 1:00 PM  

Great accomplishment Vox! I didn't notice a link to the book above (fuck _buying_ ebooks).
http://www.marcherlordpress.com/bookstore/fantasy/throne-of-bones/

I just ordered it.

I hope the full book is grittier than the novella. Thank you for the opportunity to review. Have you ever had old vine zin from Lodi, CA? :)

Anonymous Josh October 15, 2012 1:09 PM  

I'm really thinking of buying the book. My only concern is this: Is there any vampires or werewolves in it? If there are, count me out.R

Are you anti vampire, or just anti sparkly vampire?

Anonymous Orion October 15, 2012 1:10 PM  

"Besides Vox having a large to-do list and the map being somewhere on it, the biggest challenge is that I think spatially and he thinks logically about locations."

Interesting. When creating fantasy campaigns I always drew a map, then imagined the nations, sub-locales and such, then created the story from there. I'd then take the area I wanted to concentrate on and draw regional maps and city maps where needed. Sort of geographic-determinism for fantasy.

Anonymous Daniel October 15, 2012 1:10 PM  

RE: Summa Cover at Black Gate.

Summary: Women are like Charles Manson. They can even ruin a Beatles tune.

Anonymous Seriously... October 15, 2012 1:10 PM  

Hey Vox,

How do you come up with all of your names and places? Did they come about as you wrote or did you have it all planned out before you began writing?

Blogger Eric I. Gatera. October 15, 2012 1:10 PM  

Mes felicitation Vox. Bon travail. I enjoyed summa elvitica - now i am ready to follow you in your next adventure.

Anonymous Josh October 15, 2012 1:16 PM  

Besides Vox having a large to-do list and the map being somewhere on it, the biggest challenge is that I think spatially and he thinks logically about locations.

Just take a map of the Mediterranean and mash things up a bit.

Anonymous daddynichol October 15, 2012 1:21 PM  

At the top of my winter's reading list. Congratulations Vox.

Anonymous VD October 15, 2012 1:21 PM  

Is there any vampires or werewolves in it? If there are, count me out.

There are no vampires. There are intelligent lupines of a sort, but I suspect you'll be fine with them if you're okay with orcs and goblins. They're certainly not anything like conventional fantasy werewolves.

I trust that in this work of fantasy, good and evil are palpably distinct? No floundering in the swamps of nihilism and moral relativism?

Distinct, but capability for both exists in nearly every character. But no moral relativism.

Anonymous Orion October 15, 2012 1:23 PM  

"Just take a map of the Mediterranean and mash things up a bit."

David Drake did that for a series. Vaguely the Med from Italy on East (dropped Iberia which didn't figure in the story) and some what different coast lines, but the Eastern Med just the same. Worked for the story.

Anonymous Cheddarman October 15, 2012 1:41 PM  

Given the armies of whores that traditionally follow armies....-Josh

"An army of Whores" - could be novel about Washington, D.C. politics

Anonymous aviendha October 15, 2012 1:58 PM  

I hope you do a map Vox. I've spent countless hours over the years pouring over Tolkien's maps, and Terry Brooks's Four Lands. I've always hated Martin's maps.

Anonymous RedJack October 15, 2012 1:58 PM  

Actually, come to think of it, there is a little whining, but rest assured that the whiner speedily meets with a literary device that I devoutly wish Robert Jordan had utilized with regards to his character Rand al'Thor at an early stage in The Wheel of Time. In my opinion, Chapter One would have been about right.


Thank God!

Good to see you do this. I enjoyed Summa, but that may have been because I was here when you first floated a few of the stories. Looking forward to a return to this world.

Blogger Positive Dennis October 15, 2012 2:02 PM  

I hope A Throne of Bones is less grittier than A Magic Broken. I gave Broken 4 stars in my review and I am looking forward to Bones. I am so tired of the typical Amazon Kindle fantasy book.

Sexual Slavery is a common outcome from any empire, including our own. I am blogging about this, starting with Japanese "Comfort women."

www.prophecypodcast.com/journal/2012/10/16/behold-he-comes-japanese-comfort-women.html

Anonymous Matt October 15, 2012 2:21 PM  

I just hope its not filthy like Game of Thrones.

I've heard more than one person opine that the biggest threat to the completion of Martin's series is the cops getting a good look at his hard drive.

Anonymous FUBAR Nation (Ben) October 15, 2012 2:32 PM  

Josh October 15, 2012 1:09 PM

"I'm really thinking of buying the book. My only concern is this: Is there any vampires or werewolves in it? If there are, count me out."R

"Are you anti vampire, or just anti sparkly vampire?"


Anti-sparkly vampire. It all went downhill with Buffy.
The most ridiculous use of vampires was in the recent release of Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Slayer. What a load of garbage.
Hopefully that movie exhausted the use of the vampire in pop culture.

Blogger Hacked acct. No longer your supporter $1.50 October 15, 2012 2:51 PM  

Awesome and worthy work gentlemen!

Anonymous Anonymous October 15, 2012 3:36 PM  

Interesting. Downloaded "A Magic Broken" and will read it as soon as I finish "The Name of the Wind."

Anonymous Red October 15, 2012 3:37 PM  

Vox will there be an Audio book version of it? These days I get most of my light reading in while hiking or working out.

Blogger jaericho October 15, 2012 4:33 PM  

I have not read Summa yet, but I plan to. What is the suggested reading order for Summa, Magic Broken, and A Throne of Bone?

Anonymous VD October 15, 2012 4:48 PM  

What is the suggested reading order for Summa, Magic Broken, and A Throne of Bone?

Best reading order is probably Magic Broken, then Summa, then Throne. Chronological is Summa, Magic, Throne. But any can be read alone.

Anonymous VD October 15, 2012 4:48 PM  

Vox will there be an Audio book version of it?

Not unless someone wants to spend a really long time reading it aloud. I certainly don't.

Anonymous Hong Hu Shi October 15, 2012 5:11 PM  

$0.99, my ass. Amazon discriminates against the Swiss at $1.12. Bitches. I'm not Swiss, dammit!

Blogger Markku October 15, 2012 5:13 PM  

Amazon discriminates against the Swiss at $1.12

That's nothing. There must be Russkies working there, because mine says:

Kindle Price: $3.44 includes VAT

Anonymous Hong Hu Shi October 15, 2012 5:15 PM  

Kindle Price: $3.44 includes VAT

Yikes. My condolences, sir.

Anonymous scoobius dubious October 15, 2012 6:05 PM  

So... an economist who writes fantasy fiction about imaginary worlds, eh?

That sounds about right. ;-)

Though I bet your imaginary world is a lot more realistically observed than Paul Krugman's.

Seriously, though, good luck with it, hope it's a smash.

Do any of the characters do battle with can openers?



Anonymous Beau October 15, 2012 6:15 PM  

I would set it in the world of Summa Elvetica since I rather liked that world, as did most of those who read that flawed, but interesting failure of an esoteric literary exercise.

But for the flat ending Summa Elvetica could've easily been a book of the year. Maybe some day you'll revisit it.

Anonymous Daniel October 15, 2012 6:17 PM  

Re: Audio
Not unless someone wants to spend a really long time reading it aloud. I certainly don't.

Don't you have any friends at Minnesota Public Radio who are just itching to spend the next two months recording a masculine war fantasy?

Anonymous jack October 15, 2012 6:53 PM  

Just invoked the Amazon Kindle to whispernet. Will probably finish it tonight. I have no doubt it will be excellent.

And, will order the hardback tomorrow most probably.

Anonymous jack October 15, 2012 6:56 PM  

Just a note: Why not rewrite Summa, just for the giggles of it?

By the time I read the novella and the Big Book, I may know the answer. But, would it not look good in the bookcase along with the 'arts' series [done in hardback, of course]

Anonymous jack October 15, 2012 6:57 PM  

VD October 15, 2012 4:48 PM

Vox will there be an Audio book version of it?

Not unless someone wants to spend a really long time reading it aloud. I certainly don't.

Now, there would be a worthy effort. Maybe....just for the giggles of it all....

Anonymous scoobius dubious October 15, 2012 6:59 PM  

For an audio-book reading, why don't you group-source it to a bunch of fans, let each of them take a different chapter or something, that way it's not too onerous. I bet you could even set it up on Skype. Or get ten people in a studio for a day, and spring for the pizza and beer. Probably have to be done on like a volunteer basis, though, or something like it.

When I was a kid, there was this art gallery and one night every year they'd stay open all night and have an all-night marathon group reading of Finnegans Wake. People would wander in and sign up to do maybe five or ten pages -- nobody human could really last longer than that. It turned into like a crazy hyper-literary pool party, with people falling asleep on cushions on the floor, then waking up later, wandering out to flirt or smoke, coming back in. It's probably the only way to experience that incomprehensible book and keep your sanity. But it has a kind of weird hypnotic power after a while, sort of like listening to "In C" FOREVER.

But the point being you could turn the reading/recording into a big party.

Anonymous jack October 15, 2012 6:59 PM  

Markku October 15, 2012 5:13 PM

Amazon discriminates against the Swiss at $1.12

That's nothing. There must be Russkies working there, because mine says:

Kindle Price: $3.44 includes VAT


My order of a few min. ago was .99. I will stay here [USA] and let you keep Finland safe for mankind.

Anonymous CrisisEraDynamo October 15, 2012 7:03 PM  

...its focus would be on story, world, and character. Nothing else. No cleverness, no preaching, no subtexts, no reinventing wheels, no larger lessons, no deep philosophical insights. In reading all the various would-be epics, I realized that most of them suffered from trying to do more than simply tell a fascinating story, which was also a problem with most of my previously published fiction.

But a story needs to have a theme of some sort. Sure, you don't have to have characters preach, but a good story needs to be about something at least. What ideas inform its worldview? What themes run through it? Isn't this how you make the setting and characters meaningful in the first place?

Blogger Markku October 15, 2012 7:05 PM  

'Course, I got my free copy already, just bitching about this horrible discrimination for the principle.

Loretta can have the right to have babies!

Blogger Duke of Earl October 15, 2012 7:52 PM  

Flicking through Broken now. Seems fun.

Anonymous Spectator October 15, 2012 9:20 PM  

Still sounds like a porno

Blogger S. Thermite October 15, 2012 11:04 PM  

Just ordered the novella on my Kindle and so far I'm digging it...and I'm the kind of guy who doesn't usually enjoy reading about swords and sorcery on imaginary continents unless the name Tolkien or Lewis is on the front cover. I'll probably pre-order the hardcover tomorrow to give to a family member who runs a local library and used to tear through through fantasy fiction by the cartload. The fact that you're giving away a "free" copy of the ebook with the pre-order is brilliant, by the way.

Blogger mmaier2112 October 16, 2012 12:09 AM  

New e-book bought and on my phone.

I will definitely be buying at least one copy of the HC as well.

I loved the ending of "Summa", but I'm weird.

Anonymous The CronoLink October 16, 2012 12:32 AM  

God bless your hard work, Vox.

Blogger GX3Blogger October 16, 2012 1:27 AM  

Awesome, Vox! Looking forward to the maps!

Anonymous Jack Amok October 16, 2012 1:35 AM  

Perhaps I'd know the answer if I actually read any of Martin's work, but exactly what's the problem with river journeys? Just the execution, I trust. Conrad and Twain have managed some pretty good river journeys. So did Jerome K. Jerome for that matter.

I mean, if we're talking about Wheel Of Time then I know the answer. Cardboard characters tend to fall apart when they get soggy, so water should be avoided. But perhaps there's something else to this dislike of river voyaging.

Anonymous scoobius dubious October 16, 2012 2:27 AM  

There's also this hilariously daffy river journey:

http://whatbookclub.blogspot.com/2011/03/terrestrial-cuckoo.html

"Are there people nearby? and postcards?"

God bless Frank O'Hara.



Anonymous jack October 17, 2012 12:43 PM  

Just pre-ordered the book and ebook. Looking forward to it all.

Blogger Peter P November 20, 2014 9:53 AM  

Is it still possible to get the actual book in a physical format? Because from what i could tell it turns out to be sold as a collector item of sorts.

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