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Friday, February 19, 2016

Morto lo scrittore

Morto lo scrittore Umberto Eco. Ci mancherà il suo sguardo sul mondo. Aveva 84 anni. E' stato filosofo, semiologo e grande esperto della comunicazione. Non ha mai perso la voglia di osservare la politica.

Morto lo scrittore Umberto Eco. Ci mancherà il suo sguardo sul mondo

A great loss to Italy, literature, philosophy, and the world. It's not often that I personally mourn the death of a public figure, but to the extent that I had an intellectual idol, it was him.

He was as brilliant in person as he was in print, but he was also friendly and even charming. He was not merely kind to his intellectual inferiors and his awestruck fans, he was patient and generous. And although his later novels never reached the heights of his first two, those two, Il Nome della Rosa and Il Pendolo di Foucault are two of the greatest ever written in the Italian language.

He was one of the few modern immortals and I am deeply saddened that he will write no more. Addio dottore.

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28 Comments:

Anonymous ZhukovG February 19, 2016 9:13 PM  

When I saw the headline, I came straight here. I knew there would be a posting. The world has lost a great writer, and a brilliant mind. Prayers and condolences for all who knew him.

Anonymous Takin' a Look February 19, 2016 9:27 PM  

Condolences to you and prayers to him.

Anonymous VFM #5166 February 19, 2016 9:31 PM  

I read "Name of the Rose" after reading ypur posts about him. I've added it to my son's reading list for 12th grade. It was simply fantastic.


Requiescat in pace.

Anonymous Zbignu February 19, 2016 9:48 PM  

First Scalia, now Eco. Rough week for the Guineas. Two intellectual giants silenced.

Blogger Nate February 19, 2016 10:08 PM  

Dammit.

Blogger Nate February 19, 2016 10:08 PM  

Dammit.

Blogger Josh February 19, 2016 10:14 PM  

Damn

Anonymous kfg February 19, 2016 10:18 PM  

Aw shit.

Blogger GK Chesterton February 19, 2016 10:45 PM  

Please Gene Wolfe keep breathing.

I've only read "Pendulum" but it was an excellent and insightful mocking of human nature.

Blogger LP9 Rin Integra S.I.G. Burnin' Up, Dune soaked, 80 svedka - The Lord overrides all! February 19, 2016 11:28 PM  

No, no, no. Sad.

Thank you for the posts on Eco, its balm to many souls like my weak soul.

A mind like this has not departed us, he's gone on to a new life, new projects! If it were not for V, I'd never have grown from and been therpy'ed from Eco.

Let us always follow the great minds of men, of their light and logic, for they are influenced by the Lord.

Let us walk in the best, rest in peace Sir Eco.

Anonymous VFM #6306 February 19, 2016 11:31 PM  

No.

I had no idea he was mortal. His insights on the nature of the first language before it was spoken is downright supernatural.

The Name of the Rose was my first. Foucault's Pendulum my second. I thank God I read them both before my brain had stopped developing.

Thank you for remembering him.

Blogger LP9 Rin Integra S.I.G. Burnin' Up, Dune soaked, 80 svedka - The Lord overrides all! February 19, 2016 11:41 PM  

The kindness of Eco speaks volumes, a light, a man disregarding the hypnotic (side effects of) stress, he rose above it all. Thus giving us an energy with such clarity, so cool, very objective, such honor.

Rest is peace.

Blogger SQT February 20, 2016 1:05 AM  

Harper Lee died today too. 2016 is killing everyone off- it needs to stop already.

Blogger Jon M February 20, 2016 1:55 AM  

First truly intellectual books I read as a kid. He made me feel like a better (and grown) man, and for that I will always be grateful.

Anonymous Difster February 20, 2016 2:23 AM  

History will remember this artist.

Blogger weka February 20, 2016 3:31 AM  

I'd rather remember him than Harper Lee. He wrote better books. By far.

Blogger Jack Ward February 20, 2016 8:20 AM  

@11
I had no idea he was mortal. His insights on the nature of the first language before it was spoken is downright supernatural.

If you could and would, please let me know where, in Umberto's work, I can find this discussion. My curiosity is now running full tilt. Not an unusual situation when reading Eco.
What a terrible loss to the world...RIP

Blogger Clint February 20, 2016 9:04 AM  

It is a sad day, indeed. His books went on my favorites shelf as soon as I discovered his writing. I not only enjoyed his fiction, but his academic work, as well.
I once even had an academic article published that referenced VD's interview with Eco.
The literary world is poorer today.

Blogger VD February 20, 2016 9:08 AM  

If you could and would, please let me know where, in Umberto's work, I can find this discussion.

He addresses it directly in The Search for the Perfect Language. Very interesting, though somewhat technical. Also in Kant and the Platypus.

Blogger VD February 20, 2016 9:10 AM  

I should add that his novel which deals with the question is The Island of the Day Before.

Anonymous Alice De Goon February 20, 2016 10:03 AM  

The first thing I did was glance at the headline, look at the picture and say "Oh, MovieBob's dead. Wow. That diabetes really took a toll on him. He looks about 70...."

Then I read the rest of the entry and felt shamed that I'd think that one of the greatest giants of literature bore even a slight resemblance to Movieslob. The fact that the bookshelf in the background isn't covered in unsold copies of Brick By Brick really should have been a clue.

Blogger Eraser February 20, 2016 11:28 AM  

Vox, do you happen to believe in enlightened despotism? I ask because some of Eco's comments make me think he does (the controversy when he stated that the Internet has given a voice to "millions of imbeciles"). Of course I could be wrong about him, I only read one of his books, it was a long time ago and I don't even think I fully understood it.

Blogger LibertyPortraits February 20, 2016 12:31 PM  

Few novels have made me laugh out loud, and Bauldolino was one of them. I liked that one as much as Rose and Foucault.

Anonymous Charliebaud February 20, 2016 12:58 PM  

I honestly don't think it was that big of a loss, not like Rene Girard's death was. Eco wrote a handful of pot boilers with infodump segments, renounced Christ, and ended his life believing in some naive vision of a unified Europe through the EU. As for his academic work, it wasn't all that insightful. It was clear in the later part of his life he was running out of things to say.

Blogger Jack Ward February 20, 2016 3:23 PM  

@19/20 Thanks VD. The search starts...

Anonymous Adam February 20, 2016 4:07 PM  

This is the only celebrity death that has truly effected me. I feel the world has lost something as of this moment that cannot be replaced. I feel despondent.

OpenID sigbouncer February 20, 2016 10:48 PM  

God Bless him and his family.

Blogger Laramie Hirsch March 01, 2016 5:11 AM  

I know this is a dead thread. However, I found this today, and thought I'd contribute it:

The taboo to destroy was the family, which for a relativist like him, had no reason at all to exist. Since 1974, the destruction of the family has continued in successive stages. Eco happily went along with it, leaving the scene [right] on the eve of the approval of homosexual unions - the final outcome of the introduction of divorce some forty years ago. The natural family has been substituted by an unnatural one. Relativism celebrates its apparent victory.

Umberto Eco contributed significantly to the work of desecrating the natural, Christian order of things, yet what he will have to answer for is not so much the evil he did, as much as the good he could have done if he hadn’t rejected the Truth. What’s the use of forty honoris causa degrees and the sale of thirty million copies of one single book (The Name of the Rose) if you don’t gain eternal life? The young, Catholic Action activist could have been a St. Francis Xavier in this mission land which is the Europe of today. Yet he didn’t accept the words that St. Ignatius said to St. Francis Xavier and that God has echoing in every Christian heart: “What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world, but suffers the loss of his own soul?”


http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2016/02/the-real-umberto-eco-how-deeply.html

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