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Tuesday, March 01, 2016

Building a big, beautiful fork

And making VP great. Because we're all about the JOBS here.

Senior Unix Administrator
7+ years experience with Unix/Linux, including significant AIX experience, PowerHA, PowerVM, AIX, Redhat, VMWare, storage experience a bonus.

Senior Storage Engineer
7+ years of experience managing storage in a large enterprise environment.  EMC experience is highly preferred, but possibly not required.  EMC VMAX, VNX, Isilon, Xtremio.

Email JOBS for the two.

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27 Comments:

Blogger CarpeOro March 01, 2016 10:06 AM  

Drat. Low end of both of those (my experience runs in backup recovery where I have exposure to pretty much all platforms other than mainframe and AS400 - and even there had to configure a Data Domain pool for their backups).

Blogger Student in Blue March 01, 2016 10:10 AM  

I see tons of openings for senior level stuff, but none for junior level. It's kind of an odd thing - are companies just trying to hire one really good person, or are they filling up the bulk of junior level hires with H1Bs?

Blogger SS March 01, 2016 10:24 AM  

It's H1Bs all the way down. My company (over 30k employees) has no jr lvl support employees anymore. It's all Indian contractors. The IT HQ building smells awful. There really is only jobs for Americans if you're highly specialized or in management.

As for what VD posting, its always small organizations and they generally don't have room or overhead to train people up. Best way to get the experience people are asking for is to do it yourself on your time. Junior level jobs in big companies just don't exist anymore. At least until the ultras take over.

OpenID denektenorsk March 01, 2016 10:35 AM  

I see tons of openings for senior level stuff, but none for junior level. It's kind of an odd thing - are companies just trying to hire one really good person, or are they filling up the bulk of junior level hires with H1Bs?

Most companies are really bad at building the experience base they want. They'd rather have a competitor train you up and they steal you away for 5-10K more/year. It takes a special kind of personality/patience to filter through all of the dross too.

If you are still in school get awesome grades and go for a co-op. If you have top grades the professors are more likely to recommend you to prospective employers... Then when in the placement knock the socks off your employer. They'll likely make an offer to hire you straight out of school if you demonstrate keeness and a willing to learn since they've had an opportunity to try you out for practically nothing. If they make an offer to hire you before you finish your degree, resist. That piece of paper still has a preceived value in a lot of places so get it.

This was the way it was when I was in university... now with all of the diversity/equality shit I'd imagine skin colour and underwear contents matter more than ability but there are still like minded people in business, because they are focused on their business and not shit that distracts from said business.

Worst case, do your own hobbiest projects. It's next to nothing $ wise to spool up an AWS and experiment with the various SW packages on your own.

Blogger The Other Robot March 01, 2016 10:49 AM  

Waiting for the ones that say: Must have experience building distributed systems with Zookeeper, etcd, RAFT, etc ...

With respect to H1Bs, they express amazement that someone can figure out a bug that is lodged between two RPMs ... and don't understand what an initramfs is ...

Blogger Austin Ballast March 01, 2016 10:57 AM  

Many companies want to pay industry standard rates for better than industry standard people. They fail to note the inconsistency of that.

They also don't want to train anyone these days, in general, so expect people to already come with the experience, making it tougher to break in.

A poor quality or even new worker in a given area will make mistakes the more experienced person will not, which is another reason to aim for experience. Hard to get that experience, but that is the nature of things today. Those new to the field or an area need a place to fail, because that is how you learn, but failure can be really costly!

Anonymous That Would Be Telling March 01, 2016 10:59 AM  

@5 The Other Robot:

For those of us who've (mostly) avoided the Red Hat ecosystem and plan on staying that way, what does "a bug that is lodged between two RPMs" mean? One that is patched by the 2nd?

Blogger Ingot9455 March 01, 2016 11:01 AM  

@2 I would guess it's more the employment environment. It's not a time when you want to take a chance on a junior person, nor do people have simple things to build.

Blogger dh March 01, 2016 11:09 AM  

> I see tons of openings for senior level stuff, but none for junior level. It's kind of an odd thing - are companies just trying to hire one really good person, or are they filling up the bulk of junior level hires with H1Bs?

No one wants to train. I spend a lot of time on hiring, and that's the bottom line. The idea of investing in a starting out employee and spending 2-3 years building that person into a solid performer is very risky.

I have had some success recently bringing back decent employment contracts that protect both ends reasonably well. Most young people (well, anyone really) are wary of contracts that put limits on what they can and can't do for fair compensation. There is also considerable doubt if certain low-level employees can be effectively constrained by employment contract. Everyone is so used to "at-will", and it requires a really strong management team to be able to juggle and manage that level of planning and commitment. Interestingly, I stole the practice and some of the wording directly from the game industry, which has an unusually holistic view to hiring junior programmers and developers.

For at-will employees and employers, the risk with hiring younger entry-level workers is that you are getting someone without solid work habits, and without a strong track record of paying for oneself. Especially with the glut of just unstable people out there, there is a real chance that any ramp up period will be a sunk cost for any entry-level employee. At the senior or architect or VP level, I can usually start seeing good commits within a 5-7 business day period, and start seeing real cohesiveness within a month or so. I've gotten that on junior level people before, but it's somewhat rare.

It's not just young and junior people, but it seems that way sometimes, that they all assume that I've never thought of anything they propose. I try to just take good notes about their feedback, and then revisit with them in 6 months. If they are still around, and still making good observations, I'll see if they still agree with their earlier recommendations, and if they do, I try to give them some weight. More often than not those earlier recommendations are abandoned by that point.

Blogger Noah B March 01, 2016 11:26 AM  

Ilk hiring Ilk... vita è bella!

Blogger Blaster March 01, 2016 11:47 AM  

I see tons of openings for senior level stuff, but none for junior level. It's kind of an odd thing - are companies just trying to hire one really good person, or are they filling up the bulk of junior level hires with H1Bs?

Senior positions are more valuable and harder to fill. Even if companies hired 50/50 senior to junior, you're more likely to encounter postings for the senior-level positions. Also, if you have zero experience, every position is going to seem senior to you. With 10 years of experience now, I find myself passing over plenty of positions that appear too junior for me.

One more thing to realize is that even for a junior position, companies will want to hire someone with clear talent and aptitude. The big Silicon Valley software companies recruit top graduates directly from the best schools.

Anonymous The other robot March 01, 2016 11:54 AM  

For those of us who've (mostly) avoided the Red Hat ecosystem and plan on staying that way, what does "a bug that is lodged between two RPMs" mean? One that is patched by the 2nd?

Sigh. Yes, systemd sucks big time.

In that case it was a bug that was caused by one library in one RPM misusing functions in another library, and both had bugs.

In addition, some interesting, ahhh, techniques had to be used to find the issue.

Many of the H1Bs seem unable to think outside the box.

Anonymous Euro contracter March 01, 2016 12:10 PM  

Over here in Europe, a fairly common path for juniors seems to be joining a contracting firm for a few years. Such roles are often stuck with a fairly low hourly or daily ceiling, aka useful developer, but it can be a springboard. If you're good, the company you work for might well try to hire you away. (Often triggered by you telling them you're changing jobs.)

If you're adventurous and don't mind a period of slave work at slave wages, try a startup, either as a founder or as a worker. It can be a useful experience before joining a large tech firm if nothing else. You will get a more heroic resume at least.

Blogger Chiva March 01, 2016 12:22 PM  

Many of the H1Bs seem unable to think outside the box.

Very true. Makes debugging issues between multiple components a bit more of a chore.

Blogger Ahazuerus March 01, 2016 12:37 PM  

Is it time for a "go fork yourselves" gag yet?

Blogger 1337kestrel March 01, 2016 12:44 PM  

We're on the verge of shutting a division down because a key piece of engineering was outsourced to India. Naturally we have an American trying to fix it but in the meantime, there's no revenue.

Blogger Doktor Jeep March 01, 2016 12:45 PM  

@Chiva
Oh those H1B rubriks, I can tell countless horror stories of dealing with them. They cannot think their way out of a paper bag.
Worst, their FIRST action if something goes wrong is to just punt it. ZERO troubleshooting, they don't even put a report together. EVERY DAMNED TIME.

Years ago I decided to make their lives difficult. Now what happens is a few days goes by making them look as clueless as they are and eventually their white boss jumps in and real work gets done.

Anonymous Crispy March 01, 2016 1:10 PM  

Do you have your code of conduct yet? You need to make your project inclusive. < ducks >

Blogger Reed Schrichte March 01, 2016 1:33 PM  

I'm working at my current employer because they looked at the quality of the person, not whether I had 2.675 years of Ruby v.4.1a on Centos 7.1b or not. I find people who look for highly specific skills like that are themselves clueless and painful to work for. IBM was like that, they wanted smart people who liked to work and got along well with other people: the first day of work they handed me a PL/1 book and told me to start reading. I find it so ironic that a field as dynamic as software development has NO IDEA and NO FORMAL STRUCTURE for how people develop skills in new platforms and languages... the skills just magically occur! My advise to young programmers is to get a well-rounded exposure in a variety of tools and languages, then bullshit your way in but be able to back up your bluff. Oh, and don't waste your time talking to anyone, recruiter or hiring manager, from a particular So. Asian country, unfortunately they will never hire you, and are just checking off boxes to justify their hiring of someone from back home.

Blogger CarpeOro March 01, 2016 2:28 PM  

@19 "Oh, and don't waste your time talking to anyone, recruiter or hiring manager, from a particular So. Asian country, unfortunately they will never hire you, and are just checking off boxes to justify their hiring of someone from back home."

If your junior in your field, yes. Senior ymmv. I am looking for exits out of my area (tired of large corporations) into something else - but I did do a contract through a SO Asian recruiter/company for a year. As has been noted, experienced people in very focused areas can be hard to find and even the they know not to burn the bridge by bringing in a countryman that can't hack the work (most of the time. Sometimes they are in for a quick buck and hope to bs their way through fulfilling a contract).

Blogger Eric Castle March 01, 2016 4:12 PM  

It never hurts, especially in the *-nix ecosphere, to build things as a hobbiest. Create open source tools, etc. that people are going to want to use. Make them available and known (and if you can avoid Github because of known reasons the better).

These listings would appear to deal in a slightly more esoteric environment than some as well, especially in data storage. Building, designing, implementing, and maintaining databases can require a unique mind and approach to problem solving not many have.

Blogger weka March 01, 2016 4:17 PM  

Yeah. Harden up. The minions will expel anyone who suggests a code of conduct.

Blogger EF March 01, 2016 5:32 PM  

It's Happening!

Anonymous Mr. Rational March 01, 2016 5:51 PM  

Reed Schrichte wrote:don't waste your time talking to anyone, recruiter or hiring manager, from a particular So. Asian country, unfortunately they will never hire you, and are just checking off boxes to justify their hiring of someone from back home.
A thousand times this.

Blogger Old Racist Bosoms of Crackpottery March 01, 2016 6:51 PM  

Eric Castle wrote:It never hurts, especially in the *-nix ecosphere, to build things as a hobbiest. Create open source tools, etc. that people are going to want to use. Make them available and known (and if you can avoid Github because of known reasons the better).

When I'm hiring, I prefer looking at your published code to interviewing you as a way to assess your technical capabilities. If we have a voice conversation, it's to allow both of us to determine whether we want to work together.

Blogger TheRequimen March 01, 2016 9:04 PM  

Not sure if this is the right place to post something like this, but have you heard about this Voxday? http://www.nickcolebooks.com/2016/02/09/banned-by-the-publisher/

Blogger VD March 01, 2016 9:32 PM  

Not sure if this is the right place to post something like this, but have you heard about this Voxday? http://www.nickcolebooks.com/2016/02/09/banned-by-the-publisher/

A) No, it's not.

B) I suggest searching the blog before you ask me if I've heard of something that is nearly a month old. But yes, I've heard of it and I've even posted about it here.

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