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Saturday, April 23, 2016

Bleeding purple

It's not often I miss being in Minnesota. But I would have liked to have been back at First Avenue last night for the party celebrating Prince's life and music. I can't think of a better place for it.


I talked to several of my friends from Minnesota over the last day, some of whom are still there and some of whom are not. And it's been bittersweet to see how all of them, at least to this extent, still bleed purple. It's a little hard to explain the sense of loss to non-Minnesotans, because it's simply not about celebrity worship or the death of a popstar, as so many people understandably, but mistakenly, think.

It feels more like losing a cousin of whom you were inordinately proud, in part because he was so proud to bear your name and be a part of your family. Practically everyone I know had some casual connection with Prince, be it a chance encounter somewhere, a friend who worked for him, or a mutual acquaintance. It's not a very big city, after all.

Minnesota, and Minneapolis in particular, has always had an irrelevancy complex. And not without reason; everyone at my East Coast-populated university seemed to be astonished that Big Chilly and I were not some sort of lumberjacks or farmers, while we were surprised at how... backwards they were, especially with regards to music.

But Prince not only put Minneapolis on the map, he genuinely loved the city, the state, and the people. And in that place, at that time, with that particular demographic mix, people really did genuinely transcend the usual racial issues; it took me several years away from Minnesota and six months in Tokyo to understand that certain differences actually were relevant, and just as importantly, mattered greatly to nearly everyone of any color. Perhaps only in Minnesota would a black man describing someone not liking "his kind" be referring to work habits and not race.

Prince was a part of that, both cause and effect. It was interesting to hear both his manager and some of his black bandmates talk about how growing up in a 95 percent white community affected the development of his music; they listened to KQ92 and all the classic rock just like we did because there simply wasn't anything else on the radio besides news, classical, and terrible 70s pop on KS95. In Minneapolis, we didn't even understand the concept of "crossover" music because it was considered normal to have a black bassist in a white band or a white guitarist in a black one; in fact, one of the members of the larval form of Psykosonik was black.

Don't think I'm saying this as some form of virtue-signaling; you know I don't believe in that. I'm simply trying to describe the innocent, and fundamentally naive, mindset of the time, which is probably not unrelated today to disastrous things like the settlement of Somalis on the West Bank or Liberians in Coon Rapids. (I know, I know, oh, the irony.) There is probably an interesting historical study to be done there regarding the optimal level of a minority group in a population.

As for Prince, there was a sort of etiquette everyone understood concerning him. You did NOT make a big deal about him. You didn't tell him you were a fan, you didn't tell him you loved his music, and you didn't take pictures of him, you simply said "hi, Prince". He would usually smile, accept the homage implicit in the recognition, and go about his business. If he wanted to talk to you, he'd send his bodyguard over to let you know. On more than one occasion, I had to warn out-of-town guests not to react to him being around, but everyone in Minneapolis just seemed to understand that Prince was not to be bothered. Maybe it has to do with the Scandinavian ethic, I don't know. It's just how it was.

It is sad that such a beloved son of the city died alone in his incredible studio-mansion. But I have no doubt that he knew his hometown loved him, as the photo above shows. I know many, perhaps even most of you, won't grasp what Prince meant to his fellow Minnesotans, but even if you don't, try to understand that we are mourning one of our own.

Labels:

82 Comments:

Anonymous Cheddarman April 23, 2016 2:24 PM  

I lived in St. Paul for a couple of years. A good and accomplished friend of mine was most proud to have once worked as Prince's janitor.

Blogger eharmonica April 23, 2016 2:29 PM  

I once visited Hibbing to check out Bob Dylan's hometown (yes, I know he was born in Duluth). They had a very low-key pride. For such a small town, they have produced more than their share on notable people like Vinvent Bugliosi, Roger Maris, Keven McHale, and even the Greyhound Buslines.

How to you say "Happy 25th Anniversary" in Minnesotan?

"25 years, huh? Pass the peas."

Anonymous VFM #5166 April 23, 2016 2:31 PM  

Yep.

I too am from Minnesota, from a small town near the northwestern edge of the state. And we loved Prince. We were proud of the fact he was from our state. We took pride in his accomplishments. Growing up, in the 80's in my town, yeah, Michael Jackson was popular and all, but he wasn't PRINCE! Don't know if that makes sense to any non-Minnesotans or anything, but, it's just the was it was...

RIP, Prince. Minnesota will miss you.

Blogger Mad Dok Rob April 23, 2016 2:41 PM  

I am a big metal head myself, but always respected Prince's music and talent. Big loss to the music community.

I do not know if it is because I am getting old and stuff, but he was 1,000,000 times the artist that current popular music "stars" are.

Blogger Were-Puppy April 23, 2016 2:47 PM  

If you don't mourn one of your own, nobody else will.

I pretty much ignored Prince back in the day. But it's nice to see he had such an impact on all these people.

Anonymous Takin' a Look April 23, 2016 3:02 PM  

"I'm simply trying to describe the innocent, and fundamentally naive, mindset of the time"

I understand perfectly and my condolences. Those were more innocent times for quite a lot of folks.

Blogger Cataline Sergius April 23, 2016 3:02 PM  

I know Prince was given to mentoring local bands in Minneapolis. The Time, Vanity Six and so on.

You said you'd met him a couple of times. Did he ever give your group any advice?

Anonymous VFM #6306 April 23, 2016 3:02 PM  

Prince was it. My sister worked production on one of his Vault videos, a little $500,000 affair. I hope his estate releases new music for the next hundred years.

Anonymous Sagramore April 23, 2016 3:05 PM  

The first time I heard Darling Nikki was about 200 feet west of where I am now, 35 or so years ago, or my aunt's kitchen table. My cousin was an edgy 12 year old.

Still have original Purple Rain on vinyl. That, Thriller and Lionel Ritchie were required ownership in grade school.

A few years ago, my friend's brother was going on about Prince. He's a DJ and looked at me like I was from space when I asked if he was still around.

Also, he used to live on the Bridle Path and I used to take the shortcut through to Bayview and probably waved at him.

I am seriously bummed out at this.

Anonymous Sagramore April 23, 2016 3:10 PM  

It's a little hard to explain the sense of loss to non-Minnesotan

Worked for a subsidiary of IMC/Smuckers as did my father. He was your Elvis.

Blogger lowercaseb April 23, 2016 3:14 PM  

I just noticed the disco ball. You do not do things by half measures. He was and is totally worth the effort.

Blogger Josh April 23, 2016 3:15 PM  

On more than one occasion, I had to warn out-of-town guests not to react to him being around, but everyone in Minneapolis just seemed to understand that Prince was not to be bothered. Maybe it has to do with the Scandinavian ethic, I don't know. It's just how it was.

Nashville is the same way with musicians and celebrities.

Blogger VD April 23, 2016 3:37 PM  

You said you'd met him a couple of times. Did he ever give your group any advice?

No, I never talked to him during the Psykosonik days even though we played at Glam Slam. Speaking of which, the video for "My Name is Prince" is shot in the alleyway right behind the club, onto which the back exit opened out.

Blogger Rantor April 23, 2016 3:40 PM  

I grew up in AZ, the nearest thing I can understand to this is standing at the airport ATM waiting for Alice Cooper to finish his transaction. I found it amusing. Was never a big fan, but he was ours and no school dance seemed complete without "Schools Out for Summer."

Blogger Silly But True April 23, 2016 3:48 PM  

Much hay is made over Prince's raunchy lyrics; and has been noted in nearly every single segment reporting his death that I've seen.

But for sure, about one of the only pop songs out there that Jesus would be happy to sing is I Would Die 4 You. Not many report on his staunch belief as a Jehovah's Witness.

Blogger Were-Puppy April 23, 2016 3:49 PM  

About the disco ball.

I thought those went out after the disco era in the late 70's?

Blogger Jed Mask April 23, 2016 3:56 PM  

WOW... Deep, profound and compassionate... I see the disco ball and "purple walls". WORD. Amen.

Anonymous JRL April 23, 2016 3:56 PM  

Great in memorium Vox. Prince was not on my radar. I ignored him like I do most pop stars. It's good to get some perspective.

Blogger Gordon April 23, 2016 4:06 PM  

Having been born and lived elsewhere, but now a Minnesota resident of 30 years, I'm a connoisseur of Minnesota habits and idioms. Yes, it is partially Scandinavian reserve; I tell folks that when there's a riot here, it's understated and tasteful.

People here are reluctant to impose on others. You'll see it in the standard greetings: "How are you?" "Oh, I'm all right, you know." This when the second person is in chemo for cancer. It wouldn't be right, don't you know, to cause the first person to feel they have to empathize on your behalf. Or, to disturb someone just because you recognize them as a famous person. After all, the fella must get that all the time, don't you know?

And everyone here has a Prince encounter story. Except me. I have driven past Paisley Park, I think.

Anonymous Supernaut April 23, 2016 4:25 PM  

Question for the Minnesotans: other than the Viking and Lakers team colors, is their some other reason why Purple is the official color of the land of 10,000 lakes?

Was purple the State color before the Vikings/Lakers were founded?

Blogger Ben April 23, 2016 4:38 PM  

They lit up the Lowry Ave and 35W bridges purple that night. It was something to behold.

Anonymous Sam the Man April 23, 2016 4:51 PM  

Very interesting post and comments.

I would ask if that was in some way limited to the musically inclined folks of that era? I seem to recall speaking with a few chaps about various times and places and it seems that the spirit of the time, so to speak is actually limited to narrow circles.

I guess I am asking, if I were to speak to the average 40 to 60 year od chap who grew up in his era and place but was not musically inclined, would they feel the same way? Ws he that big a presence?

Blogger bob k. mando April 23, 2016 5:03 PM  

Vox
you know I don't believe in that.



yes you do.

you just don't practice it.

[ puts head to rail ]
i think i hear something coming down the tracks.

Blogger frenchy April 23, 2016 5:05 PM  

@15,

You missed "The Cross". Sign O' The Times album.

Anonymous 5343 April 23, 2016 5:09 PM  

i think i hear something coming down the tracks.

Whatever it is, I'm sure it's fine.

Anonymous Jill April 23, 2016 5:15 PM  

This is a great homage. Thanks for writing it.

Blogger Michael Maier April 23, 2016 5:39 PM  

Cranking PURPLE RAIN and the BATMAN soundtrack over the last few days, it's rather remarkable how Prince put so much great groove and funk feels into electronic drums and keyboards. He grooved more with 80s tech than anything on the radio today.

We're given re-hashed junk with no heart, no soul, no feel. And certainly no greatness. Just too-loud, super-compressed Autotuned crap.

Wonder how much the piece in the DailyMail is correct, that he was crippled by stage fright his whole life.

RIP, Prince. If you didn't find peace here, I hope you have it now.

Blogger Ben April 23, 2016 5:45 PM  

@26 MM

Michael Bland on the drums. Nuff said.

Anonymous Vidfamne April 23, 2016 5:57 PM  

Very interesting stuff about Minnesota a few years back. Has VD ever written at length about growing up in that enviroment? If not he should seriously consider it.

Anonymous Anonymous April 23, 2016 6:00 PM  

The Ladies always went insane for "pussy control" at clubs in Minnesota.

Blogger Jourdan April 23, 2016 6:13 PM  

Growing up in L.A., we had similar attitudes with regard to some of our movie stars, that is those who were also considered part of the community. (Rod Serling, for example). It was considered impolite to make a big deal about them or to bug them in public.

Well, it's things like this that tie us to our homes, and it's things like this that makes it so painful to watch the transition to New America. I'm sure Vox would have a reaction upon seeing Somalis in full garb walking in his town that I have seeing tens of Sinaloa peasants walking in mine.

Anonymous Quartermaster April 23, 2016 7:04 PM  

Ask not for whom the bell tolls....

Anonymous NateM April 23, 2016 7:13 PM  

I can certainly understand the Twin Cities ethic. Growing up in a certain other Midwest city that lives in infamy, we respected loyalty to the city above all. If there was a star, major or minor who lived there, and there were a few, people were tickled that they cared enough about the city to live there, or hell, even visit. So to have a legend like Prince live there, and express his love to the place had to meant a a Lot

Blogger Tiny Tim April 23, 2016 7:21 PM  

I had many black friends when very young and one of the older brothers of one of those friends was into Funkadelic, Parliament, Rick James and Prince before any other white person in Texas knew who Prince was. Long before 1999. Even then I knew Prince was special and that stuck with me. Why I don't know but the black brother idolized him.

I know I am banned and won't abuse that status but Prince was Americana and I am saddened by his passing.

Thank you for allowing me to comment.

Anonymous The OASF April 23, 2016 7:25 PM  

So I guess Prince and Merle Haggard we're both suffering from respiratory illnesses and both were publicly complaining about chemtrails and the chemtrail flu and both died early deaths what within a week or so?

Just saying...

Blogger Ken Prescott April 23, 2016 7:54 PM  

I remember when Purple Rain came out and everyone made a big deal about the raunchy parts. I really think Prince was trying to reach the lost sheep of our generation; the core of the story is about acceptance and forgiveness.

Blogger Ken Prescott April 23, 2016 7:59 PM  

"Wonder how much the piece in the DailyMail is correct, that he was crippled by stage fright his whole life."

I would not be surprised. Look back through history; one of the greatest English writers of the 20th century (Winston Churchill) was severely dyslexic; a composer (Beethoven) wrote some of his greatest work after he went deaf...

I once heard a priest (also dyslexic, and a great student of the Bible) say that God must be profoundly allergic to human strength, because all too often He works through our greatest weaknesses.

Blogger Aeoli Pera April 23, 2016 8:07 PM  

JRL wrote:Great in memorium Vox. Prince was not on my radar. I ignored him like I do most pop stars. It's good to get some perspective.

Ditto all.

Blogger James Dixon April 23, 2016 8:34 PM  

> Long before 1999...

Purple Rain came out in 1984 and Raspberry Beret in 1985. Pretty much everyone who listened to the radio knew those songs.

Blogger Tiny Tim April 23, 2016 8:48 PM  

James Dixon says "Purple Rain came out in 1984 and Raspberry Beret in 1985. Pretty much everyone who listened to the radio knew those songs."

This is why I got kicked off of here... ignorant people and their comments.

FYI Mr. Dixon: 1999 is a Prince album released in 1982.

Blogger frigger611 April 23, 2016 8:57 PM  

I was never a fan, but as a guitar player I had great respect for him as a musician - dang, he was just about virtuoso on half a dozen instruments? Anyway, he always had a pretty good touring crew. I rigged a few of his shows - once encountered him backstage while working, he was friendly. You always remember those kind of folks, they strike you as being surprisingly down to earth.

Minneapolis is lucky they had a good ambassador. Here in Cincy/northern Kentucky we got George Clooney. Who just couldn't wait to get outta dodge for an Italian villa address.

And he's a political deuche, but you already knew that.

Blogger TontoBubbaGoldstein April 23, 2016 9:05 PM  

Absolutely awesome, thoughtful post.

Anonymous A Visitor April 23, 2016 9:06 PM  

"You did NOT make a big deal about him. You didn't tell him you were a fan, you didn't tell him you loved his music, and you didn't take pictures of him, you simply said "hi, Prince". He would usually smile, accept the homage implicit in the recognition, and go about his business. If he wanted to talk to you, he'd send his bodyguard over to let you know. On more than one occasion, I had to warn out-of-town guests not to react to him being around, but everyone in Minneapolis just seemed to understand that Prince was not to be bothered. Maybe it has to do with the Scandinavian ethic, I don't know. It's just how it was."

Very interesting ! Thanks for the post, Vox. It is hard for us to understand what native Minnesotans are going through re: Prince. The whole thing, you all mourning him (but more than just mourning) is another sign of true diversity and differences between the states. For example, when David Letterman dies, I won't really be mourning or caring, despite him being from Indiana, me living here (a few years across the U.S. and world aside) since I was five, and strong ancestral links to the state.

@vfmshadow0342

Regarding what you asked the second to most recent thread about Kasich, that is the first I've heard of it. If it is true, I'll be livid. Between the three Kasich is the most establishment there is! I HATE what that man stands for.

@4 Do not take this as a dig at Prince but most music stars today aren't worth a rip.

@7 That's legit.

@14 Going off your story, closest I can go to in that regards is Emma Hewitt grabbing my hand and letting me sing part of "Waiting" when she was playing at Bassmnt back in 2013 in San Diego.

@16 When I was at a cotillion class in the late '90s, there was a big old disco ball hanging in the middle of the room (and yes this was the dedicated building for it). If you ever go to The Vogue in Broad Ripple, there is still one hanging regardless of what genre is playing. I don't think I recall ever seeing one in Madrid or Barcelona though.

Anonymous VFM #6306 April 23, 2016 9:43 PM  

Very interesting stuff about Minnesota a few years back. Has VD ever written at length about growing up in that enviroment?

Eh. It'd be Garrison Keillor.

With guns.

And raves.

And fistfights.

And sex.

So, basically Prince already covered it.

Blogger Gapeseed April 23, 2016 9:49 PM  

"Wonder how much the piece in the DailyMail is correct, that he was crippled by stage fright his whole life."

I read somewhere that Ben Carson has severe stage fright himself, and that the anti-anxiety meds he took before Republican debates manifested by giving observers the sense they were watching a tightrope walker about to fall to his death.

Blogger Gapeseed April 23, 2016 9:51 PM  

And it goes without saying: Rest in Peace, Prince. You invested your talents well.

Blogger LP9 Forever Solidified in Gold! Rin Integra S.I.G. April 23, 2016 9:53 PM  

41 Prince is a gentle humble soul.

As for whatever tries to sully his work or his soul, its all felled attempts, the man at work in our genx era, that genre or our genre is beloved. It is not emotionalism, its the grief that occurs when true talent passes on.

And so what about healthcare issues, everyone has them, many people suffer pain and endure it, some seek treatment, Prince is not a trainwreck celeb or trashy. Hardwork, genius and what others call insanity are a triad but Prince was not insane but eloquent and NOT PC. Prince often explained his lyrics, its avail viewing at youtube.

Here is to "raspberry beret", "diamonds and pearls."

Blogger Tiny Tim April 23, 2016 9:58 PM  

LP9 Forever Solidified in Gold:

Thank you. Couldn't have been said better. Have a good night.

Blogger LP9 Forever Solidified in Gold! Rin Integra S.I.G. April 23, 2016 10:06 PM  

46 no, I'm not a local, just a person back then who wanted style, class, etc., back then Prince and so many others were fresh air voiding out the damn boomer trash music (boomers, love you, I'm sure you helped produce/work with Prince, not the issue or the topic)

Stand by and watch for http://vigilantcitizen.com/category/musicbusiness/ coverage.

Blogger Thucydides April 23, 2016 10:07 PM  

Growing up in Canada, Prince was part of the soundtrack of our daily lives, but like most people, I only saw the surface: flashy clothes, raunchy lyrics etc.

Seeing "Purple Rain" was eye opening, the story was clearly about redemption and growth, and I listened to his songs with new appreciation. OF course, any song with openly religious meaning was only to be heard in the privacy of your or a friends house when you put an album on the turntable (remember that?), no radio station in the Great White North would touch that.

Still, Prince had a way of making his influence and ideas known through other artists, not just his own stable of bands like Morris Day and the Time, but also songs written for or adopted by other singers like Cindy Lauper, Sinead O'Conner and even Kate Bush. Talk about spreading the net wide.

RIP

Blogger Lazarus April 23, 2016 10:11 PM  

"Wonder how much the piece in the DailyMail is correct, that he was crippled by stage fright his whole life."



Stage fright may have been the original source, but eventually it is merely that one needs the drug to avoid withdrawal symptoms. Tobacco smokers and heroin addicts know this. It is fundamental aspect of addiction.

Anonymous Hoss April 23, 2016 10:12 PM  

Prince got mad respect. My friends were either metal or rap fans, and nobody ever ripped Prince for his music, they acknowledged his talent, nobody called him a fag (which was typically used for someone not in their wheelhouse; not a rip on homos), and everyone knew their girls liked him. And I grew up in Indiana, not Minnesota.

Anonymous bobdobbs April 23, 2016 10:20 PM  

@Lazarus... OT really, but Oh Law, ain't that the truth. These ten months since I last had nicotine and I still have times when I desperately want a smoke. The only good thing about it is the fix, the relief. Just sayin.

Anonymous bobdobbs April 23, 2016 10:32 PM  

@VD. fantastic writing, you made me feel it even though Prince never did it for this white boy.

Growin up with J.B. and Zappa and PFunk and Kool & the Gang and all that fusion jazz and Charlie Parker, they did. Now I know it was cause Prince was all Minnesota and stuff just keks. We'll miss Prince here in the ATL a boat load.

Blogger Lazarus April 23, 2016 10:49 PM  

bobdobbs wrote:@Lazarus... OT really, but Oh Law, ain't that the truth. These ten months since I last had nicotine and I still have times when I desperately want a smoke. The only good thing about it is the fix, the relief. Just sayin.

Your ego has to accept the fact that it has a different identity, and must develop different coping structures and interests. (maturation process that was delayed by addiction)

Anonymous Jay Will April 23, 2016 10:54 PM  

I don't get it. Wasn't this guy just another talented deviant? Drugs did him probably but your love for him means it doesn't come up. Is this guy any different than Bowie? He had homosexual tendencies and abused drugs like all these liberal winners. Another fag is all over the British press using an injunction to stop the truth.

Prince was a fake he probably died miserable, injecting drugs like the loser he was. This guy is the pinnacle at best of a hedonist culture that is about to die out. Look at the faces of his fans and the physiognomy will say "these people are fucked".

First time I've been shocked on here. This guy represented fag progressivism. I don't care how many instruments he could play he dressed up like a bird. I can only assume you are blinded by nostalgia. The more these pseudo-religious fakes die out the better. He's a boomer fucking hero. Self expression manifest in controlled hedonism. The backlash you talk about on here will burn his history away. The end of js mill, progressivism, means destroying all these bullshit heroes. Normal men in 1950 would have looked at his fag look and wanted him to get it. He died alone in some big mansion with no connections and liars all ready to dress it up for him. He's no hero he's the pinnacle of the arse end of a dying civilization. Obsessed with the self.

The modern age can be summed up by the puzzled look on bing Crosby face singing with David bowie. The world was changing, Crosby was yesterdays man, a normal man, bowie the future. Anti-family pro-homo. Islam will burn it all down if scum like prince is the best of us.

Blogger Lazarus April 23, 2016 11:07 PM  

Jay Will wrote:Prince was a fake he probably died miserable, injecting drugs like the loser he was.

Not agreeing or disagreeing with your diatribe Jay, but I would just like to point out that he did not inject. which, if the story be true, was why it was hush-hush.

It is similar to Prescription addiction which is not frowned upon in polite society.
It is only when you go outside the approved channels that it is a bad thing.

Oh, and he probably was not miserable when he died. Just the opposite. Most non-addicted people die horrible, painful, lingering deaths, not junkies

Anonymous Big Bill April 23, 2016 11:23 PM  

Gosh! How many people were stabbed and shot in Minneapolis? How many OD's? How many cars and dumpsters torched? How many police cars jumped on? Don't tell me that all those folks had fun in the street all night long without SOMEBODY getting killed.

Blogger haus frau April 23, 2016 11:27 PM  

He was a devout enough Jehovah's Witness that he was known to go knocking on doors, evangelizing to strangers. Can you imagine Prince turning up on your doorstep with those flyers? I wouldn't know him on sight myself but I bet it made for an awesome story for a few Minnesotans.
I don't know much about Jehovah's Witnesses. I hope it is close enough to the Truth that he is with our Lord. I also wouldn't hold it against him that he apparently had a long term opiate addiction. Having known a few addicts, they can put up a genuine fight against that devil for a lifetime before it takes them. Some people have the wiring for severe addiction and can't ever get past craving the high. Also, it sounds like he had pain problems that aggravated the addiction.... That said, it is a shame that he had no children to pass his legacy onto.

OpenID nightskyradio.com April 23, 2016 11:44 PM  

I got a little bummed out when Kurt Cobain and Layne Staley died, I was a fan of their music. Same with a couple other celebrities, like Johnny Carson. Feel a little down, that's it and I'm over it quick. The closest thing I ever felt to real sadness about a favorite artist passing was when Curt Swan died. I grew up reading his comics, and studied his art almost religiously.

I never owned any Prince records, saw him in concert, or even liked more than a dozen or so songs. but for some reason his passing is kind of sticking with me. Been listening to his music a lot the last couple days. Weird.

Anonymous Big Bill April 23, 2016 11:45 PM  

What I found delightful about Prince was his ability to transcend race. He was not a Professional Negro, always a bit anxious and angry when around large masses of white folks.

He did not live in Minneapolis (18% Negro). He lived in Chanhassen (0.5% Negro). He was black, surely. But due to his upbringing in Minneapolis, he was Scandinavian, too.

How odd in our age of increasingly strident Negros, nursing offense from every imaginary micro-aggression, Prince chose to bed down every night surrounded by Minnesota Nice white folks.

Blogger AdognamedOp April 24, 2016 12:13 AM  

Funny, I was watching Prince's performance on SNL just now and he was playing a "Vox" guitar.
Great tune that's available on you tube now.

Blogger Scott Birch April 24, 2016 12:27 AM  

Bing Crosby puzzled? He wouldn't have made it without a green light from Murica's mid 20th century lavender mafia ..

Blogger pyrrhus April 24, 2016 1:12 AM  

Prince was childlike in his simple love of life....one of a kind

Blogger Rambam April 24, 2016 1:25 AM  

Thought he was weird, but liked many of his tunes.

Anonymous VFM #6306 April 24, 2016 1:27 AM  

I don't get it.

You could have stopped there, Jay Will.

Anonymous Spartacus xxxxx April 24, 2016 1:28 AM  

Lazarus wrote:Jay Will wrote:Prince was a fake he probably died miserable, injecting drugs like the loser he was.

Not agreeing or disagreeing with your diatribe Jay, but I would just like to point out that he did not inject. which, if the story be true, was why it was hush-hush.

It is similar to Prescription addiction which is not frowned upon in polite society.

It is only when you go outside the approved channels that it is a bad thing.

Oh, and he probably was not miserable when he died. Just the opposite. Most non-addicted people die horrible, painful, lingering deaths, not junkies



Best pitch ever for drug addiction.

Blogger Rambam April 24, 2016 1:35 AM  

This comment has been removed by the author.

Anonymous Jay Will April 24, 2016 1:56 AM  

@64

I'm spot on vfm 6306. I really do get it, you clearly don't.

Blogger JCclimber April 24, 2016 2:13 AM  

There are some seriously attractive people in the crowd in that picture.

Kind of illustrates what VD said years ago about Scarlett Johanssen wouldn't be that big a deal around there.

Anonymous Spartacus xxxxx April 24, 2016 2:16 AM  

nightskyradio.com wrote:I got a little bummed out when Kurt Cobain and Layne Staley died, I was a fan of their music. Same with a couple other celebrities, like Johnny Carson. Feel a little down, that's it and I'm over it quick. The closest thing I ever felt to real sadness about a favorite artist passing was when Curt Swan died. I grew up reading his comics, and studied his art almost religiously.

I never owned any Prince records, saw him in concert, or even liked more than a dozen or so songs. but for some reason his passing is kind of sticking with me. Been listening to his music a lot the last couple days. Weird.


You're over it quick because you are supposed to be. Next.

I used to party with Layne back in the Music Bank day (before the bust and B&G's flight to Sweden or wherever). Cutting to the real short version- here was man who flew too close to the Sun. He wasn't born to it nor groomed to it like Crosby, or Elvis * 2, or Morrison, or on and on and on. I believe on information he really did die, nihilistic, alone in the apt. on the Ave, his arm in a mess. No one stepped in.

Anonymous VFM #6306 April 24, 2016 2:24 AM  

The Beautiful Ones was about Minnesotans, JC Climber. There is some movie where Johanssen is described as a "dime" by some clubbing guys. I think it takes place in New Jersey.

"Paint a perfect picture
Bring 2 life a vision in one's mind
The beautiful ones
Always smash the picture
Always everytime."

Compared to a Jersey club, Johanssen is a nickel and three cents in the Eden Prairie Mall.

Anonymous Susan April 24, 2016 2:53 AM  

It isn't hard for me to understand this at all about Minnesota and Prince. I cannot think of another state which would have produced somebody like Prince. Minnesota just has the perfect conditions to create people like him. How else to explain Al Franken and Jesse Ventura?

I love how you are honoring the man via your blog. Very fitting. If people don't "get" Prince and why Minnesota is going to miss him deeply, then screw 'em.

Blogger freddy April 24, 2016 3:13 AM  

He was at Oracle a few months back watching Steph and company, next night, crushed that same arena. Then, the notorious post concert impromptu gigs. This one started around 4 am at The Great America Music Hall. How could anybody shred at 5am? Dilaudid. Yep. That 'Splains everything.

The Percocets probably killed him. His longtime dealer stated yesterday that the Acetominophine probably did him in.

Anonymous Alsos April 24, 2016 3:31 AM  

Just got back from one of AMC's memorial "Purple Rain" showings.

- audience was a mix age-wise (I had expected a Gen-X-fest), and clapped and cheered as if at an actual concert;
- having only seen the moving once, probably fifteen years ago, I was surprised at how weak the acting and dialogue was - the performance sequences were so good that they seemed to be from an entirely different movie;
- the silly fun of the mid-1980s "look" always makes me laugh, yet it seemed so serious then;
- the initiation scene at the lake is pure alpha;
- Apollonia looked far more womanly than an actress cast in that role today would;
- every time Billy appeared onscreen during the big finale I heard "It's a trap!" echo in my head;
- given Hollywood's desire to remake every movie ever made, I can't help wonder when the "Purple Rain" reboot featuring Kanye West is due in theaters.

Blogger peter blandings April 24, 2016 4:44 AM  

I know many, perhaps even most of you, won't grasp what Prince meant to his fellow Minnesotans, but even if you don't, try to understand that we are mourning one of our own.

yeah, i don't get it. i didn't even realize prince was that famous. i was under the mistaken impression that he had faded completely. the day after, i saw one of his guitar solos on yahoo and it was pretty amazing. but i couldn't figure out the whole purple business on the blog, i didn't make the connection for a couple of days. you and prince, incongruent to say the least. sorry to hear he was so troubled.

Anonymous Opus April 24, 2016 5:28 AM  

You may have missed it but on the day of his death Niagra Falls was lit purple. Remarkable serendipity as the cause for this was the 90th birthday of Canada's Head of State.

I saw Purple Rain when it was new in 1984 at some Mall Movie Theatre somewhere in Maryland. I enjoyed the songs and had them on cassette tape. Always preferred Prince to Jackson and unlike Jackson, Prince was not a divisive figure. His stock can surely only rise.

Blogger WrenchTurner April 24, 2016 6:49 AM  

It was the 80's-90's the country was still 80 or so percent white. It was easy to be naive about race then. especially before the LA riots and the OJ verdict

Blogger JaimeInTexas April 24, 2016 9:56 AM  

I do not understand any of this hurt feelings for another celebrity. I just don't understand. To me it seems so weird.

Blogger OGRE April 24, 2016 1:00 PM  

I grew up in a small town in West Virginia, descended from coal mining hillbillies and italian immigrants. I was 8 in 82 and my cousin who I thought was cool AF was 10 and got 1999. It was the baddest music I'd ever heard. Was eagerly awaiting Purple Rain and got the tape as soon as I could, it was like the third or fourth album I ever owned. Prince was never 'my favorite'artist but he was way way up there, have several albums and he has been a constant source of musical entertainment in my life...dancing to "7" in a circle of girls and guys in a dorm room in 92, making out to "Most Beautiful Girl", to just a couple years ago a mix CD being the soundtrack to a beach vacation.

A couple years ago I introduced my teenage cousin...shes half black but raised in an all white family... to Prince. I was driving her around and had a mix CD on and "Pink Cashmere" was playing. She asked "so is he queer or something?" because he sings so high in that song I guess. So I switched it to "Sexy MF" and said "So do you still think hes gay?" The answer was a resounding NO.

I guess my point being: Prince was a big factor in the musical journey of a lot of poor and middle class white folk growing up in BF West Virginia in the 80s and 90s. Many of us loved him; those who didn't at least wouldn't admit it. As I explained to my mom, this was my generation losing its Elvis, except our Prince was truly talented and a good soul that we all admired and adored.

Blogger J Curtis April 24, 2016 7:48 PM  

This link contains an interview with the recently departed Vanity that I had the privilege to see when it originally aired in 1992. She describes her life as a musician and how she completely transformed her life through the power of Jesus Christ.

Blogger Jerry27 April 26, 2016 2:16 AM  

Vox may be testing us. The white race is under seige by Zionist using non-whites as assult weapons to break down ethnic cohesion. Disralli's comments on race should be kept in mind. La Raza in Minnesota says the same about race. I worked as a ta and my chicano students in St. Paul kept disappearing. I asked the flamboyant homesexual head of the mexican studend group at the u of m where they went. After I persisted -- he may have been pulling the gringo's leg -- he said there were pimps sniffing chiconi in St Paul and my studants were back in Mexico after making the hit. I did not believe him at the time. The Zionist want to reduce all others to a race blind gendor blind debtors. Prince makes me appreciate Mennonites.
thanks,
Jerry

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