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Monday, May 02, 2016

Big Larry's European adventure

It sounds like Larry Correia had a blast on his European tour:
Of all the languages, German was by far the easiest to pick up words and phrases for me. Despite being related to Portuguese and Spanish, French sounds totally eluded me. And Czech is HARD (they have like 46 ways to make conjunctions). But German shares a lot of word roots with English, and the actual structure is pretty straight forward. Plus it is fun to just walk around and make up vaguely German sounding names for things, like a pigeon is Das Poopinbirden.

The next day we drove across all of Germany to the Czech Republic, and I got to experience the autobahn, which my whole life has been this sort of mythical place that has no speed limits, and is filled with drivers that understand slow traffic stays right, and where they never camp in the left lane, and in fact, if you’re blocking the left lane, they’ll come right up on your bumper at 100 miles an hour, honking, and flashing their lights. It was a place devoid of mercy, unforgiving of weakness. So we set out.

Apparently there are two kinds of tourist drivers on the autobahn. Those who are weak, fearful, whose crying pillows smell of lilacs and shame, who stay in the truck lane, or who wander out into the left occasionally, timidly, to be honked at and chased aside by awesome Teutonic Super Drivers…

And the other kind is the American who manages to average 180km an hour across all of Germany in a Volvo diesel station wagon.

It was AMAZING. I felt like a race car driver across an entire country. You know why German cars don’t have cup holders? Because if you stop to drink while driving, YOU WILL DIE. And you should. You need to be on. I’d get a gap, jump out to the left, floor it (because fuel economy is for hippies I’m on the mother f’ing autobahn!),  and nobody pulls out in front of me in a minivan to enforce their personal speed limit, people ahead of me going slower (like 100mph) immediately get out of the way, and when some bad ass comes up behind me in a super car, I get out of his way, and then they blast past me like I’m standing still.

It was beautiful.

You wouldn’t think a diesel Volvo would be comfy at 112 miles an hour, but it really is. Yes. I friggin’ love the autobahn. If I lived here I would buy a giant BMW or Audi and drive very fast, all the time. Why can’t we have something like this here? I would like to institute autobahn style rules on I-15 in Utah. Sure, a few thousand people would probably die in the first weekend, but after that it would be awesome.
Can confirm. What some might find interesting is that Italy has its own sort of temporary autobahn, which is certain stretches of the autostrada on Sunday mornings from 9-11 AM. Spacebunny and I were driving home from Verona one morning, doing about 100 MPH or so, when I saw a red car coming up VERY FAST from behind.

It turned out to be a Ferrari 456. A few moments later, a tricked-out blue Porsche with a vague resemblance to a 911 flew past as well. My Call of Duty mate, who used to race Formula 2, has friends who drive for Ferrari, and drives an Aston Martin, later told me that there are certain sections of the autostrada that are intentionally left camera-free so that the men with the supercars can let them rip at times when the traffic is light.

European pro tip: if you see silver in the distance behind you, move over without delay. No one in Europe drives faster, or is more likely to ride your bumper, than drivers of silver Mercedes station wagons. My theory is that if you need a station wagon, but insist on spending the money for a high-performance engine, you're probably a roadway lunatic. I see plenty of nice, big-engined sports cars and sedans cruising along the autostrada at reasonable speeds, but every single Mercedes station wagon driver is flying along at least 20 MPH faster than the flow of traffic, no matter how fast it is, with his left blinker permanently on.

And for some reason that still eludes me, they are always silver.

Larry is right about German being easier for English speakers too. As for French, I honestly found it easier to pick up Japanese. The Italians may speak rapidly and use the same word to describe three completely different concepts, (hence the need for all the gestures) but at least they enunciate.

Labels:

86 Comments:

Anonymous Napoleon 12pdr May 02, 2016 5:47 AM  

I found German and French about equal in difficulty. Spanish was a PITA, I retained very little. And Tallyrand was right, English has an enormous advantage by not assigning gender to objects.

Anonymous EH May 02, 2016 6:02 AM  

All the French vowels have degenerated into these little grunting sounds. Italian can be simulated by a mixture of Latin and Spanish, with the correct accent and hand gestures added. (I know because I watched my dad do it. Highly entertaining.)

Blogger Gaiseric May 02, 2016 6:04 AM  

@1 And we got riff of most of our conjugations. Sure, spelling English sucks, but I'm convinced it's one of the easiest major languages of the world to learn otherwise.

Blogger Gaiseric May 02, 2016 6:04 AM  

@1 And we got riff of most of our conjugations. Sure, spelling English sucks, but I'm convinced it's one of the easiest major languages of the world to learn otherwise.

Blogger JACIII May 02, 2016 6:08 AM  

So that's why Mercedes built the e63 wagon.

Blogger Christopher Yost May 02, 2016 6:10 AM  

English just likes to use the exact sounding noises to describe entirely different ideas and things.

The only way to know the difference is waiting for the context while listening to the sentence.

Or, usually, reading.

At least Chinese uses tones...

Blogger James Dixon May 02, 2016 6:14 AM  

> Larry is right about German being easier for English speakers too

English is a Germanic language, so that's not too surprising.

Blogger Stilicho May 02, 2016 6:34 AM  

Vox, Larry could tell you that the silver station wagons are used by vampires (or their Renfields) for transporting coffins. Silver (but not real silver, that's cruel) to reflect sunlight. Speedin because the renfield knows that he damned well better be at his destination before the master wakes. Mercedes... because they're frickin vampires, can't expect them to ride around in Volvos!

Blogger Stilicho May 02, 2016 6:35 AM  

How do you silence an Italian?

Handcuff him.

Anonymous VFM #6306 May 02, 2016 6:40 AM  

They are all silver because the wind shear has stripped them all of the original paint.

Blogger Aeoli Pera May 02, 2016 6:54 AM  

In Germany they needed a law where the same need is accomplished by unprincipled exception in Italy. Sounds right.

Blogger VoodooJock May 02, 2016 6:55 AM  

FIA way back in the 30's mandated certain colors to indicate the nationality of the team fielding that car. Silver was Germany's, which is why Mercedes, Porsches, and those big Auto Unions Bernd Rosemeyer drove were all silver.

Brits had green and Italy had red, which is why most Ferraris were red and Lotuses and Jags were green.

It's national pride.

Blogger Dr. T May 02, 2016 6:56 AM  

Surprisingly VFM#6306 is not far from the truth. Silver has been the traditional color of Mercedes race cars since the 1930s; they run under the nickname "Silberpfeil" (silver arrow). Originally the color was due to the cars being made from unpainted aluminum. Legend has it that one day the Mercedes car was slightly over the weight limit and they had to strip the paint. After they won, the nickname was born.

Blogger Salt May 02, 2016 7:37 AM  

It's not called British Racing Green for nothing.

Anonymous Sensei May 02, 2016 8:03 AM  

English just likes to use the exact sounding noises to describe entirely different ideas and things.

The only way to know the difference is waiting for the context while listening to the sentence.

Or, usually, reading. At least Chinese uses tones...


Chinese (Mandarin, at least) has far more homonyms than English, even with tones included, and relies on context far more than English. Plus foreigners trying to learn the language tend to struggle with getting the tones right, so it becomes all contextual anyway. (Or if the speaker is from Sichuan, the tones don't help at all...)

Blogger Jeff Wood May 02, 2016 8:04 AM  

Vox, you gave the game away on the temporary super-autostrade. In my little book on driving in Italy I decided to leave that out so as to keep my readers alive a little longer.

Yeah, last weekend I drove from Tuscany to Liguria and back, and as usual whenever I pulled out to overtake into an empty left lane, a silver or white SUV would magic itself to within a few inches of my back bumper.

My theory on the autobahnen is that the German authorities wisely keep a space where their people can go berserk, then return to calm conformity when they leave the road.

Blogger CM May 02, 2016 8:18 AM  

I would be a lavendar pillow person. Though, that could change in a sportscar with no kids in the back.

Blogger Shell May 02, 2016 8:36 AM  

Not sure I could swing over, but I would love to be a passenger, especially in a sports car.

Anonymous Roundtine May 02, 2016 8:37 AM  

German grammar is a bit tougher, but the sounds are easier to pick up for English speakers.

Ausfahrt.

Anonymous bobo May 02, 2016 8:55 AM  

Ditto on the Autobahn, that's some good clean family fun there, eh Cotton.
And the 5-mile long tunnel into Austria is like a '80s arcade racing game for us red-blooded Americans.

Blogger L. Jagi Lamplighter Wright May 02, 2016 9:03 AM  

Once, many years ago, I made a wrong turn in a country where I could not read the signs, and ended up on the autoban...on my bicycle.

It is only by the grace of God that I survived to speak about this.

(Actually, it wasn't so bad because there was a huge shoulder...but I got honked at A LOT in my quest to escape back to normal road-space. ;-)

Anonymous Michael Maier May 02, 2016 9:04 AM  

Saw Larry's piece the other day. The whole thing is a long but very fun read. Glad he went to Heidelberg, one of my favorite places in Germany.

Now I just need $4500 of mad money to buy the official MHI rifle.

Anonymous JI May 02, 2016 9:10 AM  

I also live in Utah and drive I-15 from SLC to Nevada frequently. People set their cruise control 1 mph over (or under) the speed limit and then park in the left lane, so yeah, a few thousand well-deserved deaths should do the trick.

Anonymous Napoleon 12pdr May 02, 2016 9:11 AM  

I drove the autobahn near Stuttgart for a week, and frankly found it easier than some parts of the U.S. Interstates. The road was in much better condition, and the Germans drive cooperatively - you won't find Granny Slowcoach in the high-speed lane.

Blogger rycamor May 02, 2016 9:20 AM  

"As for French, I honestly found it easier to pick up Japanese. The Italians may speak rapidly and use the same word to describe three completely different concepts, (hence the need for all the gestures) but at least they enunciate."

As one French guy I worked with (a fairly decent guy) said, there is French spoken by Parisians, and then there's the rest of France. He was from St Tropez and he explained it this way:

If I say I am from St. Tropez, I say "Je suis de Saint Tropez." (Enunciating it to actually match the written French).

If I am Parisian I say "Je 'e Paris." (Waving his hand in a purposely fruity manner)

Blogger Nate May 02, 2016 9:29 AM  

I laughed more than I should at "das poopinbirden"

Blogger Nate May 02, 2016 9:33 AM  

AMG station wagons are what would happen if you put a real suspension and 600hp in a minivan.

Anonymous BGKB May 02, 2016 9:41 AM  

I liked Germany myself and hit some of the ruined castles.

Why can’t we have something like this here?

Germany can have it because its full of Germans.

Tallyrand was right, English has an enormous advantage by not assigning gender to objects

That's odd I thought douchebags like Cameron and Jeb were male.

From linked post there is this cold medicine in England called “Night Nurse” and I don’t know what the hell they put in it, but it kicks Nyquil’s ass

In Europe they have OTC meds with opiates and speed in them, so watch out for drug tests.

Anonymous Athor Pel May 02, 2016 9:48 AM  

" 3. Blogger Gaiseric May 02, 2016 6:04 AM
@1 And we got riff of most of our conjugations. Sure, spelling English sucks, but I'm convinced it's one of the easiest major languages of the world to learn otherwise."


You say that because English is likely your native language.

Depending on the native language of the student English is one of the hardest.

English has a lot of exceptions and that's not just spelling or pronounciation but also grammar. There is a lot of latitude in permissible sentence construction which sounds like a good thing but what it does is give lots of choices. The more choices you have the more things you need to learn.

And one reason for the spelling and pronounciation exceptions is vocabulary size, English has a crap ton of loan words from other languages. So it's possible to run across several ways to say the same thing depending on who you're talking to. Again, a problem of choices.

We don't have gender in verb or noun construction but we do have compulory use of articles along with multiple plural and past tense constructions that many other languages do not have.

Yes, to learn enough English to get by is not that hard if you limit the vocabulary and the grammar you learn. But that's true of any language.

Difficulty in learning English actually gets worse as you keep learning it because it is only later that the student runs into just how wide and deep the language really is. It never gets easier. Many other languages have their difficulty front loaded so that once you get over the initial hump it just becomes vocabulary acquisition after that.

Blogger The Kurgan May 02, 2016 9:53 AM  

French is such a sloppy language because of all the fellating French men indulge in. Kinda gives them that mumbly-hummy quality of speech.

Blogger VFM #7634 May 02, 2016 10:07 AM  

German is easy if you don't bother with gender and gender endings (der or das? Forget about it, just say "de" instead) or proper sentence structure and use simple past (ich ass meinen Frühstück schon).

If you know Spanish, you do Italian by wiping out final S'es and making your plurals by changing -os to -i, -as to -e, and -es to -i. Plus, it's okay to pronounce an s like a z in Italian. To do Portuguese, speak Spanish through your nose and slop your vowels more like you do in English.

Blogger JCclimber May 02, 2016 10:11 AM  

What most autobahn stories leave out is that many long stretches of autobahn have speed limits all over the place. Near any town, turn off, road construction....Boom, slowing down to 100 kph, 90, 70. Argh!

It was amazing how fast some of those cars appear on your bumper. On the autobahn in a small rental economy car, with the family, and finally got a decent stretch where the speed limit seemed to be lifted....Got that puppy up to about 175 kph. I check the rear view mirror about every 8 seconds even in normal driving in the US. Because of paranoia about not being 100% certain this was really a no speed limit zone, I'm checking about every 5 seconds for the polizei....nothing showing for as far back as I can see, in the fast lane.

Then flash and honk, some Audi has magically appeared out of nowhere in the 5 seconds since my previous check. Das poopinbirden indeed, that is what I almost did at that moment. To this day I cannot figure out how fast that car must have been going to gain on me in those few seconds.

Because I quickly pulled over into the "slow" lane, still going about 110 mph, and feeling like an American tourist idiot for inconveniencing someone with a real car. And watching him take off, I doubt he hit more than 170 mph. So, my only conclusion is that he must have been in a slight dip in the road during my previous rear view check.

Just wish I'd had the $$$ to rent a sports car for a week, but probably not a good idea while jet-lagged and with a family in a foreign country.

Good times. I heartily endorse the idea of putting some autobahn stretches in various parts of America to thin out the herd.

Anonymous BGKB May 02, 2016 10:19 AM  

Larry said that the reason we don't have the Euro Bullet trains here is because of population density. A more accurate reason is we chose to have blacks that throw rocks from bridges like caused the recent major east coast Amtrak train wreck instead.

Anonymous kfg May 02, 2016 10:22 AM  

What other color would a Silver Arrow be?

Anonymous Eduardo May 02, 2016 10:27 AM  

What an oversimplification of the hardest most annoying language in the planet!!! U____U portuguese is much more than just accent... Is an act of self-sacrifice and total devotion to a senseless grammar with rules that never apply in the correct moments, and are so full of exception that the exeption IS the rule.

U____U ohhh buddy buddy without a face and a vile behavior. Existe mais entre o céu e a terra que sua vã imaginação pode pensar.

----------------

So person above me, just what car would you rent??? What about an old honda NSX? We know that turns and corners is where the fun is at!!!! 8D

Blogger Ahazuerus May 02, 2016 10:33 AM  

I have the good fortune to live in Germany and can confirm the basics of Larry's adventure. However if you drive the autobahn regularly you will soon encounter the lilac scented pillow biter who ventures into the fast lane at 105 kph while you are doing 225. This adds a whole new level of excitement to the experience.

Also highly recommend Italy, both forthr driving experience (frantic but very forgiving of tourists) and forthe child-friendly attractions. Eg in Rome, the Coliseum was free for under 18s. One of themost famous places in the world, free for children. A lot of places we've visited in Italy were like this, with a few notable exceptions eg Capri island.

Toured southern France, Monaco, Northern Italy, Austria, and southern Germany in an Audi A6 Sport. You really need that on your bucket list.

Blogger The Other Robot May 02, 2016 10:46 AM  

Nationalism seems to be on the rise in Germany and Russia.

Blogger Cataline Sergius May 02, 2016 11:04 AM  

My favorite line from Larry's piece.

Speaking of security, I won’t say where we saw this, because I don’t know what they were there for, but American trigger pullers stand out. It’s that Beardly McOperator look. I’m talking full Contractor Chic. When you see a dozen guys all eyeballing something, and they’re sporting 5-11s, Tap Out, tribal tattoos, Big Penis Watches, and various Surefire and Under Armor logos, and as innocuous bystander tourist guy I suddenly feel like I’m standing in line at SHOT Show, I certainly hope this isn’t you guys’ idea of “blending in”. Sheesh. At least have the really buffed dude ditch the paracord bracelets.

I love those guys but the concept of "covert" is completely beyond them.

Blogger Jourdan May 02, 2016 11:14 AM  

My grandparents spoke French at home and by watching and listening growing up I realized that French is different from the other Latin languages in that the *entire sentence* is constructed in advance by the speaker depending on the words that will be used.

So, for example, if one is going to say "I know he's from Montreal but in fact his French is really not so good after 20 years in the United States." the sentence would take on a sound different IN WHOLE from that if you merely substituted "in the United States" with "in Great Britain."

In most languages, one would expect the sentence to sound the same in both instances, until the final clause (regardless of where in the sentence the "final' clause is placed due to that language's rule).

In French, the entire structure becomes, in effect, one big long word.

This is why, as mentioned above, Parisian French is do challenging; it's the shortest, most compact version. You must be incredibly proficient with the language, enough to understand implied words, to get it.

Blogger Jourdan May 02, 2016 11:17 AM  

Example, Parisian French:

"I don't know"

Standard French: Je ne sais pas. (jzay nay say paw)

Parisian French: Jzay paw (with slight vowel reference to "sais", plus context to be understood).

Anonymous Napoleon 12pdr May 02, 2016 11:19 AM  

Speaking of blending in...I try to do so when overseas, simply as a matter of courtesy. But I've a friend who's a master of it, good enough to be taken for a German.

He spent a career in the intelligence and counterintelligence services. Very erudite, very cultured, and very dangerous.

Blogger The Other Robot May 02, 2016 11:21 AM  

@38: Kratman mentions that in the Carrera series ...

Blogger Nate May 02, 2016 11:23 AM  

Beardly McOperator. LULZ

Anonymous rienzi May 02, 2016 11:27 AM  

Driving in Spain was a pleasure. Drivers paid attention to their driving, and were far more skillful than here. Almost none of the brain-dead stuff we get in FL.

Big problem was parking. Drove around Seville for half an hour before finding a slot. Cars triple-parked by the university. Parking garages near non-existent, and the ones that exist are tiny by our standards.

Blogger Sheila4g May 02, 2016 11:35 AM  

Oh God, I LOVED the autobahn back when I was in Germany. Driving in Italy, even on the highway and at relatively slower speeds (say 85pmh) was far more nerve wracking, both due to the drivers and the curves in the road construction. Another great drive, believe it or not, used to be in former Yugoslavia - from the Bulgarian border up to Belgrade. Pretty well-built highway, almost no cars, and if there were speed limits, I never had them enforced. Used to love zipping up that to get to the overnight car-train to the Austrian border. Since I'm not your standard female driver, I have to constantly watch my speed here in the US. Besides the constant rolling roadblocks (3 cars abreast each with a careful driver at exactly the speed limit), it seems everyone is now taught (by all the Chinese, Indian, and Arab driving instructors) to turn corners at 10 mph. Seriously. Add to that the women in SUVs or vans and they're all petrified they'll tip over if they actually try to accelerate into a curve. Drives me MAD.

Never had a desire to learn French and can never understand it, but it does sound pretty. Wish I'd learned German. Czech I could understand a number of words (because of my Russian and Bulgarian), but had some problems with it because of its use of the Roman alphabet, rather than Cyrillic. I always enjoy picking up as much of a local language as I can, even if I'm only in country for a few days.

Glad Larry had fun - just picturing him roaring down the autobahn puts a smile on my face.

Anonymous kfg May 02, 2016 11:38 AM  

Has one of those guys ever ruined his paracord bracelet by using it as intended?

Anonymous kfg May 02, 2016 11:44 AM  

"Almost none of the brain-dead stuff we get in FL."

In Florida you get a lot of women from NYC who first sat behind the wheel of a car when they were 70.

Blogger Dave May 02, 2016 12:13 PM  

@Jeff Wood do you have other stuff on Italy? Sister transferred to Naples last fall and shipped her car over. She's done a lot of the tourist stuff already.

Gonna bring the family over this fall or next spring until she kicks us out.

Blogger CM May 02, 2016 12:32 PM  

In Florida you get a lot of women from NYC who first sat behind the wheel of a car when they were 70.

Turn signals in florida are code for "speed up and don't let 'em in." It gives me a road rage problem.

Blogger Jeff Wood May 02, 2016 1:06 PM  

@48

Evening Dave (That's what it is here).

I hope your dear Sister is on the outskirts of Napoli. That is a brutal place to learn to drive Italy.

If our host will permit me, perhaps you have found my eBook, Driving in Italy: A Beginner's Companion. It was written with North Americans in mind as well as my native British.

I have notes for a book on Italy, but confess it is a year or two away. There is so much to learn.

Best wishes to La Sua Sorella.

Anonymous Samson J. May 02, 2016 1:15 PM  

I'm tickled by the idea of French being particularly difficult for English-speakers to learn. That would never occur to us Canadians.

Anonymous kfg May 02, 2016 1:18 PM  

"That would never occur to us Canadians."

Maybe you should, ya know, try learning to speak French.

Anonymous CC May 02, 2016 1:19 PM  

The basics of German, like words and phrases are easy to learn because it's generally written phonetically and spoken clearly. But getting it correct grammatically is hard as nails and can take a lifetime.

But as Irish writer Flann O'Brien wrote: "Waiting for the German verb is surely the ultimate thrill."

I also advise anybody interested in German to read Mark Twain's essay on the language, it's very funny.

French has the opposite problem, grammatically much easier but getting a handle on what they're mumbling between the "ehhh"s is the problem.

One downside with the Autobahn is that parts of it do have speed limits and you need to know where you can get camera'd.

Anonymous BGKB May 02, 2016 1:19 PM  

Has one of those guys ever ruined his paracord bracelet by using it as intended?

That's what paracord shoelaces are for.

Blogger Geir Balderson May 02, 2016 1:26 PM  

Being something of a Gearhead myself, I am curious as to the make and model of the automobile Vox and Spacebunny travel in?

I bet it is rosso!!

Blogger Cataline Sergius May 02, 2016 2:15 PM  

Has one of those guys ever ruined his paracord bracelet by using it as intended?

I saw it happen once.

I forget what the hell needed to be repaired. For the sake of argument we'll call it the leaf springs on a truck.

"I need 100 mile an hour tape and five fifty cord."

The tape was no problem but there was only of us with any paracord on him at all. Six foot four 230 pound Gonzo looked like he had just been asked him if he would mind strangling his new puppy.

Anonymous WaterBoy May 02, 2016 2:18 PM  

Loved the autobahn, the drivers there knew what they were doing.

What freaked me out were the two lane highways where drivers would create a third lane down the middle, expecting everyone else to drive partially on the shoulder to let them by. It was quite a different...custom...to adopt.

Anonymous Fnord Prefect May 02, 2016 2:19 PM  

As for French, I honestly found it easier to pick up Japanese.

Preach brother!

Speaking French is not about grammar, vocabulary or even the need to communicate: it is virtue signalling that you have spent the best part of your life learning how to pronounce each and every word exactly in the prescribed manner.

I've been here going on twenty years and e v e r y t i m e I talk to a stranger they have that vacant look on their face signalling that they've decided not to understand me since I did not have the correct intonation on the "e" grave in the second syllable. It has become so tedious that I don't go outside anymore unless I have too.

The French language is a prison for the people of France: centrally controlled, overly complicated grammar, woefully limited vocabulary, no room for innovation; basically NewSpeak.

Moreover, it is subsided to the tune of billions of euros (TV, film, books, radio, music) since no one would choose French as a means of expression without overwhelming arrogance or a huge bribe.

Anonymous Fnord Prefect May 02, 2016 2:22 PM  

...no one would choose French as a means of expression without overwhelming arrogance or a huge bribe.

Both of which the French have in abundance.

Blogger Noah B May 02, 2016 2:32 PM  

I find French much easier to deal with in written form than verbally. I just don't find the pronunciation at all natural. German, Italian, Spanish, no problem.

In Italy I was a bit scared of driving on the A1 and other autostrade at first. The books I read said there were speed cameras everywhere and you would be ticketed by mail if you sped, and there were indeed signs everywhere claiming there were cameras monitoring speed, but I didn't even see one of them. I drove faster than almost everyone - also in a diesel Volvo stationwagon - but luckily didn't get any tickets. Either the "speed cameras" are mostly a bluff or just something more common in urban areas. But when someone did pass me, it wasn't unusual for them to be going 130-140 mph.

I love how Europeans yield to faster traffic. Strangely, they have a much more fluid concept of "lanes" than Americans do, which can be unnerving when you're passing someone.

Blogger bob k. mando May 02, 2016 2:55 PM  

VD
And for some reason that still eludes me, they are always silver.



see, i know you're just Ted Cobbler trolling me.

and i still can't resist the bait.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_Arrows


i also like that Ted Cobbler ( TC ) is the inverse of Chuck Tingle ( CT ). has anyone ever seen those two standing next to each other?

Blogger JaimeInTexas May 02, 2016 3:19 PM  

@28. BGKB

"That's odd I thought douchebags like Cameron and Jeb were male."

Only in grammar.

Blogger JaimeInTexas May 02, 2016 3:23 PM  

Blocking the hammer lane ... a very sver pet peeve of mine. Clovers is what Eric Peters calls 'em.
I flash my lights and honk my klaxon, then, if they still block the left lane, I pass on their right and honk and give the one finger salute. FWIW, it is illegal to block the left lane in Texas and, still, we got the damn clovers blocking the left lane on roads that are posted 75MPH, even the posted 85MPH.

Blogger bub May 02, 2016 3:49 PM  

Many years ago, somebody in a silver car was terrorizing the autobahn, eluding the police easily for months. As I recall, they had to use aircraft to finally track the guy. It was an engineer who had installed a rolls royce jet engine in his benz.

Anonymous Napoleon 12pdr May 02, 2016 4:12 PM  

bub, that sounds like the British guy who built himself a car with a proper V-12 engine.

A Rolls-Royce Merlin.

Anonymous BGKB May 02, 2016 4:30 PM  

That's odd I thought douchebags like Cameron and Jeb were male.

Speaking of douchebags, broken clock right once a year http://freebeacon.com/culture/599725/
"Former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg was booed onstage during the University of Michigan’s graduation ceremony over the weekend after criticizing college “safe spaces.”

Anonymous LastRedoubt May 02, 2016 4:55 PM  

One of the Alan Dean Foster short stories - in "who needs enemies" if I recall, The Last Run?

Anyway, involved an aircraft engine installed into a station wagon...

Blogger Seneca May 02, 2016 6:05 PM  

A friend of mine in response to the Correia story; "We drove from to Las Vegas and back and the traffic was muddled because American drivers get in, camp in, deliver babies in the passing lane! For the love of efficiency, move over!!!

Blogger Were-Puppy May 02, 2016 6:52 PM  

We drive fast in Atlanta.
Except when we can't.

Which is 99.999999% of the time, thanks to

DWA - driving while asian

brothers driving from the passenger seat

moms swatting kids in the back of the van while no one is steering

fat yankee types reading a paper spread out on the wheel drinking coffee in one hand while cell phone in the other.

intermittent drunks driving the opposite direction of all other cars

Roscoe P. Coletrane and Buford T. Justice hiding behind billboards

one drop of rain

I could go on, but I'm sure you get the picture :P

Anonymous Cheddarman May 02, 2016 7:37 PM  

I am surprised the Germans don't have PANZERS that can do 180 km/hr on the autobahn

Anonymous My Take May 02, 2016 8:15 PM  

I dearly love my wife, but she still does not understand why her German car did not come with a cup holder

Blogger JaimeInTexas May 02, 2016 8:42 PM  

In my experience, my guess is that, over 80% of problem drivers in the gdamned cell phone addiction,in combination with just plain low IQ. Most drivers just think that driving is passive, like sitting on the sofa. They do not foresee, anticipate, do not mentally do a what-if scenario at a given moment. A driver's license is meaningless.

Anonymous WaterBoy May 02, 2016 8:46 PM  

Oxymoron: Highway billboards and traffic signs advertising against distracted driving.

Anonymous LastRedoubt May 02, 2016 9:11 PM  

@were-puppy

intermittent drunks driving the opposite direction of all other cars

Springfield Mass, while I was stationed there, had their annual "old/drunk lady getting on the interstate in the wrong direction downtown" thing going. One year said old lady had a head on with a semi carrying reactor fuel

Blogger JaimeInTexas May 02, 2016 9:14 PM  

In my experience, my guess is that, over 80% of problem drivers in the gdamned cell phone addiction,in combination with just plain low IQ. Most drivers just think that driving is passive, like sitting on the sofa. They do not foresee, anticipate, do not mentally do a what-if scenario at a given moment. A driver's license is meaningless.

Blogger Were-Puppy May 02, 2016 11:09 PM  

@74 LastRedoubt
@were-puppy

intermittent drunks driving the opposite direction of all other cars

Springfield Mass, while I was stationed there, had their annual "old/drunk lady getting on the interstate in the wrong direction downtown" thing going. One year said old lady had a head on with a semi carrying reactor fuel
---

Another old timer classic is when they pull up to a house or resturant and slam the gas instead of the brakes.

Blogger Were-Puppy May 02, 2016 11:14 PM  

LOL - TrigglyPuff has a friend!

http://www.breitbart.com/milo/2016/05/02/student-sends-hilarious-2000-word-complaint-to-college-authorities-after-milo-event/

Anonymous LastRedoubt May 03, 2016 12:12 AM  

@76 were-puppy

True that

Blogger VFM #7634 May 03, 2016 12:41 AM  

@35 Eduardo

Indeed. I find Spanish boring -- sort of like a real-life Interlingua -- and Portuguese perversely fascinating.

Blogger Were-Puppy May 03, 2016 12:41 AM  

Most entertaining video of TrigglyPuff. Some guys did a great job of adding in plenty of hilarity to an already funny situation :P

https://youtu.be/Y69tkCbeC5o


Anonymous Passinthough May 03, 2016 1:32 AM  

Autobahn rules on I-15 through Utah; epic.

Blogger weka May 03, 2016 1:52 AM  

If I lived in Europe I could justify a fast station wagon. Because of the German and Italian and French Roads, where you can drive as God and Enzo Ferrari intended. But I live in NZ. Where if you go 105 km/h you get a fine and demerits, and 40 km/h your licence gets taken and the car confiscated. On the spot.

If I had an AMD Mercedes E350 station wagon I would lose my licence in a day. Because I have a lead foot, I drive something boring and reliable with good four wheel drive. By a Japanese firm.

Anonymous Athor Pel May 03, 2016 6:29 AM  

"63. JaimeInTexas May 02, 2016 3:23 PM

Blocking the hammer lane ... a very sver pet peeve of mine. Clovers is what Eric Peters calls 'em.
I flash my lights and honk my klaxon, then, if they still block the left lane, I pass on their right and honk and give the one finger salute. FWIW, it is illegal to block the left lane in Texas and, still, we got the damn clovers blocking the left lane on roads that are posted 75MPH, even the posted 85MPH.
"


Texas is left lane passing heaven compared to Arkansas.

Also, because Texas has very wide shoulders on rural highways being stuck behind someone on a two lane isn't a sentence in purgatory. They get over onto the shoulder to let you pass. It's a beautiful thing.

Blogger Randsom Smith May 03, 2016 9:11 AM  

Can confirm the rule about Mercedes wagons.

Whenever I've been to Germany to visit relatives, the Mercedes wagons are driven by people who think they're Ayrton Senna. But drive more like Bruno Senna.

Blogger Akulkis May 03, 2016 10:05 AM  

"Chinese (Mandarin, at least) has far more homonyms than English, even with tones included, and relies on context far more than English. Plus foreigners trying to learn the language tend to struggle with getting the tones right, so it becomes all contextual anyway. (Or if the speaker is from Sichuan, the tones don't help at all...)"

Chinese is a common written language, used by a family of mutually incomprehensible spoken languages.

Blogger VFM #7634 May 03, 2016 11:23 AM  

Chinese is a common written language, used by a family of mutually incomprehensible spoken languages.

People always forget that spoken Cantonese is as unintelligible to Mandarin-speakers as Norwegian is to us.

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