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Thursday, June 02, 2016

Affirmative action in action

This sort of affirmative-action-related meltdown happens far more often at the better schools than anyone would credit:
Throughout elementary, middle and high school, Kidd’s talent for science showed. She was accepted into the highly competitive Thacher School, a private boarding high school in California where she promptly earned the nickname “The Science Girl.”

The teachers loved her and lavished her with praise, Kidd wrote, using her homework as an example for other students. When she was a sophomore, her chemistry teachers announced before 240 classmates that Kidd had garnered the highest score in a national chemistry competition.

These accolades only fueled Kidd’s drive to succeed, and it culminated in her acceptance to an Ivy League university.

“The ultimate climax was when I got into Columbia,” Kidd wrote. “Because it’s such a prestigious school, it made me feel like I had proven to myself, and everyone around me, that I made it.”

When she got on campus, she decided, naturally, that she would study science. But things didn’t go smoothly.

The day she moved in was her birthday. “I felt really alienated and alone and didn’t find the Columbia students very welcoming,” Kidd wrote. “During my freshman year, I quickly went from star student to slacker.”

In contrast to the tight-knit community at Thacher, Kidd said, “at Columbia I was lucky if a teacher talked to me.” The lack of close connections with her teachers discouraged her from engaging with her schoolwork.

“Even though I was wired to be a good student,” Kidd said, “I didn’t feel inspired. I got through the year, getting B’s and C’s, but I didn’t care. I was just happy the summer arrived.”

Upon her return to classes in September, Kidd signed up for computer-science classes and “hated every minute of it.”

One morning in April, she woke up and realized she needed to make a change and “started plotting [her] escape.”
She probably would have been a star at a second-tier school. But it's not only unreasonable, it is cruel to be throwing kids like this into situations where mediocrity is the best possible outcome and failure is the most probable one.

Anyhow, she's better off doing what she actually wants to do than what everyone else expects of her. It's neither right nor fair to put the weight of a race on one young kid who happens to be an outlier.

Labels: ,

97 Comments:

Blogger Mr. Naron June 02, 2016 1:40 PM  

Or, stop blowing smoke up people's butts just because they're good at science and math.

Just say good job and move on. Don't give them the impression they're somehow superhuman because they can succeed in math and science. They're going to find out pretty quickly they aren't.

Anonymous FAILBOAT June 02, 2016 1:42 PM  

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2014/05/lectures-arent-just-boring-theyre-ineffective-too-study-finds her complaint mirrors the predictions of this study. Is the alternative hypothesis that Columbia is more backward in science teaching than a highly selective high school in California more or less likely to be a contributing factor than the one you present above regarding affirmative action?

Blogger bob k. mando June 02, 2016 1:47 PM  

2. FAILBOAT June 02, 2016 1:42 PM
Is the alternative hypothesis that Columbia is more backward in science teaching than a highly selective high school in California more or less likely to be a contributing factor than the one you present above regarding affirmative action?



embrace the healing power of "and".

also, i find it absurd that she completely lost interest in science because her new teachers "stopped paying attention" to her.

all she's really saying is that she never cared about science AT ALL. instead, she was just doing what chicks do, looking for external validation.

cut off her narcissistic supply of "oh, what a good student you are!" and she immediately stops caring about doing research.

Anonymous VFM #6306 June 02, 2016 1:54 PM  

Why are Ivy League schools still permitted to enslave black students? This brave woman plotted and executed her escape without the underground railroad, but where is the Harriet Tubman of today?

Scholarship is Slave Culture.

Anonymous Susan June 02, 2016 1:57 PM  

While I like and agree with your assessment of this girl, I just don't have a lot of sympathy for her sense of entitlement at play here. The other students didn't recognize immediately her epic awesomeness? Well then instead of doing the work and committing the effort of making them notice her, she decides that she is entitled to be a failure instead. Only person she is hurting is herself.

She is just a new version of what the dindu's and gimmiedats have been all along. She should have to face some consequences for terrorizing her family and friends like she did though. Manpower was spent trying to track her down, should be some cost to that from her.

OpenID dc123884-8321-11e5-a9c5-a3b429e4d26a June 02, 2016 1:59 PM  

Reminds me of something Malcolm Gladwell wrote about not choosing an ivy league or "top" school, but rather one where you will excel and won't feel alienated like the young girl was.

If you do go to college, you'd be better off going to school that has a strong program in whatever you're interested in rather than one for name recognition. That happened to me.

Anonymous Crispy June 02, 2016 2:02 PM  

Anyone surprised that she was raised by a single mom?

Blogger Cataline Sergius June 02, 2016 2:03 PM  

Kidd said, “I didn’t feel inspired.

Who the fuck cares if you are inspired or not. You've got a job to do.

Can she not do her work unless she is constantly being petted and fawned over?

Anonymous Amigo June 02, 2016 2:07 PM  

She appears to be bright enough, if the remark about having the highest score in a national chemistry competition is correct (at her school I guess). What she no longer got was constant affirmation of how good she was. The world is an uncaring place for the most part and she wasn't tough enough to stick it out.

Anonymous Thales June 02, 2016 2:07 PM  

If you do go to college, you'd be better off going to school that has a strong program in whatever you're interested in rather than one for name recognition. That happened to me.

QFE. Choose the program, not the school. The school at large doesn't mean anything after sophomore year (and you can get those first 2 years of GE out of the way at any community college, which you should probably do anyway to save $$$) and you're spending all your time in one building.

Blogger Matthew June 02, 2016 2:08 PM  

Article by Yanan Wang.

Blogger Unknown June 02, 2016 2:08 PM  

Amazing how she expected a community to somehow coalesce around her upon arrival. And how without social praise she was unmoored from motivation.

Anonymous Quartermaster June 02, 2016 2:08 PM  

I visited Princeton, on invitation, before I went to college and decided before I left the campus I would never attend there. It's a great place if you want to brag about your Princeton degree, but that's about it. I went to Tennessee Tech and never looked back.

Anonymous Laz June 02, 2016 2:13 PM  

Whatever she decides to do, I bet she'll still need that constant validation to stay motivated.

Blogger Fatherless June 02, 2016 2:14 PM  

Sounds like she became addicted to encouragement. This is why women will never dominate competitive fields or develope industries or artforms.

Blogger Fatherless June 02, 2016 2:16 PM  

*develop new industries or artforms.

Anonymous Philalethes June 02, 2016 2:17 PM  

It's neither right nor fair to put the weight of a race on one young kid who happens to be an outlier.

Hmm? No mention of "race" in the excerpt. Or did you mean "race" in the sense of competition among students? So I went to the linked article, and lo and behold, the girl is black – though only the photo gives away this fact; there is no mention of "black" or "African-American" (I didn't look for "negro") in the text of the story.

I hope this girl figures it out, and tells all the people trying to manipulate her to go to hell.

I too noticed that her problem with Columbia was primarily emotional – she didn't feel all warm and fuzzy there. Because a girl is smart enough to do well in a STEM field doesn't mean she isn't a girl – who will starve in an environment geared to the male character. Nor does being smart mean she is unsuited to motherhood; the black community could use a few smart people. But her real potential is likely to be wasted, as she is still encouraged to "find herself" by doing anything but what her biology suits her best to do.

Her mother tells her: "Even if you’re a stripper, you’re gonna be the best stripper out there."

Truly a time of insanity.

Anonymous Laz June 02, 2016 2:21 PM  

"Kidd wrote that she has no plans to return to school. Instead, she wants to make music and work on her writing and modeling careers."

3 to 1 she ends up a stripper.

OpenID basementhomebrewer June 02, 2016 2:25 PM  

I would say more likely she is lying probably even to herself. It's easy to shine in highschool, even exclusive High schools. In my own experience I went from the star student to just a slightly above average college student.

What I learned after the first semester was that college actually required studying. Especially if you are enrolled in a top program that actively tries to weed you out. I knew many students who were smart but lazy and refused to study. They all washed out using a myriad of other excuses kind of like her "lack of recognition" excuse.

Blogger tz June 02, 2016 2:29 PM  

Colleges and Universities should be banned. They are not merely useless, they are destructive.

Anonymous JI June 02, 2016 2:29 PM  

Many kids get burned out when they go to college, it happens all the time, usually a maturity issue, sometimes their hearts just aren't in academics. It happened to me; I took a year off from college and spent the time bicycling across North America, stopping and getting jobs as needed.

Blogger Ron Winkleheimer June 02, 2016 2:32 PM  

#19

I know a guy who went to Georgia Tech who told me that when he was in high school he thought he was a genius, then he went to Georgia Tech and found out he wasn't.

Blogger Ceasar June 02, 2016 2:35 PM  

'In contrast to the tight-knit community at Thacher, Kidd said, “at Columbia I was lucky if a teacher talked to me.” The lack of close connections with her teachers discouraged her from engaging with her schoolwork.'

Her mother was a "successful" academic. I am sure her teachers at the Thacher School knew this and treated her as such. They assumed she was gifted (like mother) and helped her walk through the motions. However, when getting to Columbia, there was no one offering the "Tips" and "Tricks" to get through studying and homework. It is completely on the student to figure it out as they should if they deserve to be there. Her reaction of completely closing off when confronted with difficulty is rather strange from someone who was so "committed" to academics in High School. No praise, no awards, no pats on the back....Just work and effort.

Blogger tz June 02, 2016 2:40 PM  

I think the difference was the environment. Universities are stupid and useless.

When I was in High School, I went from the top of the AP Calculus class to 2nd from the Bottom by a change of teachers. I got a 5 (A) on the AP exam. The first teacher was very challenging. The second was at best tepid. He told my mother I had no talent for Mathematics. I was taking THREE math classes and acing the other two while taking hard science classes. The other teachers who knew me couldn't understand - oh, and I had highest score in the school on the state Mathematics competition, I don't know where I ranked in the state, and as a junior, I got 35/40, a senior got 34/40, and the rest were below 28.

Anti-inspiring teachers will kill any enthusiasm and talent.

Blogger VFM #7634 June 02, 2016 2:45 PM  

Anyone surprised that she was raised by a single mom?

@7 Crispy
She's black, so... no.

I did snicker a bit when I saw this quote in the article:

“You don’t have to explain anything,” she told her only child. “An investigator told me you might be stripping. Even if you’re a stripper, you’re gonna be the best stripper out there.”

Nah... she's too skinny for most black men.

Anonymous Michael Maier June 02, 2016 3:06 PM  

I wouldn't bet a penny on her placing anywhere near the average SAT score for white Princeton students.

Blogger Les Sabines June 02, 2016 3:06 PM  

Some twenty years ago a long time friend was admitted to Columbia. She'd had smoke blown up her ass by a history teacher at our HS whom I was sure was screwing her (and a few years ago, we found out, yes, he was having sex with her). This woman says her time at Columbia was one of oppression of her free thought, of overt conservatives and Republicans hijacking her ideals, of them being so oppressive and traditionalist that it cost her a lifetime of opportunity.

I don't really understand. You're either ultra-lib or not lib enough, and if ultra-lib, then you're not lib enough. Really? And like young Ms. Kidd, I think my friend and thousands of others like them expected to remain the cream of the class, as they were in high school. This is how the Elite recruit, I think. A lucky few break away, the majority are left to stew in anticipation of being part of the Elect, and the Chosen? Well, they've known from the start anyway.

This friend of mine, she's twice divorced with two kids who have intellectual and physical disabilities. She's still wondering what her life's purpose is, why she can't be/do/effect more, like she thought she would.

I used to feel bad for her, but no longer. I'm not particularly intelligent, but I felt the con-game of college coming. I worked FT and let my employer pay for my education. And then I married and had kids and went AWOL on cubicle life and have never been happier. Funny how living the sexist stereotype tends to bring you happiness. But it's also very much a White stereotype.

Blogger YIH June 02, 2016 3:08 PM  

No photo, of course, but no problem either.
All the puzzle pieces fall into place.

Blogger synp June 02, 2016 3:14 PM  

Amigo wrote:She appears to be bright enough, if the remark about having the highest score in a national chemistry competition is correct (at her school I guess). What she no longer got was constant affirmation of how good she was.
I'm guessing it's not just affirmation. Bright kids can get excellent grades and become star students in high school with very little effort. Then they go to college. First, there's dozens of others there who are just as bright or brighter than them. Second, You can't get by without putting significant effort.

I was like that. Top student at a good high school. Never spent any time on homework except to do it during class. The I went to university and my grades crashed. I didn't actually fail, but low enough. Took me over a year to get my act together and start to actually work at it. Then my grades bounced back, but I wasn't then nor will I ever again be the rock-star for whom everything comes with little or no effort.

I guess she's never made it over the hump.

Blogger Alexander June 02, 2016 3:24 PM  

Q: What do you say when you realize you made national news when you terrified all your loved ones.

A: Just Kidd-ing.

Anonymous Lt. Dan June 02, 2016 3:30 PM  

Scored a 31 on my ACT in 1993. Big whoop.

Graduated community college with gentleman's Cs.

Under NO illusions about my intelligence being special. It's not.

I figure my EQ makes up for my IQ.

Forrest Gump's mom said it best.

Anonymous RedJack June 02, 2016 3:31 PM  

Thales wrote:If you do go to college, you'd be better off going to school that has a strong program in whatever you're interested in rather than one for name recognition. That happened to me.

QFE. Choose the program, not the school. The school at large doesn't mean anything after sophomore year (and you can get those first 2 years of GE out of the way at any community college, which you should probably do anyway to save $$$) and you're spending all your time in one building.
I disagree. The name on the the diploma means something. You are buying the brand of the school. The brand of a local CC is not worth much compared to that of a major school. Employers will look at that brand. Not saying an Ivy is ever a good idea, but most CC's are not going to advance your career path.

Anonymous Faceless June 02, 2016 3:37 PM  

I had a conversation with a black separatist. He was from a HBCU. He had a very simple point - he wanted to make sure his people got the credential. Yes, you may hold your nose that Morehouse or Tuskegee or Fisk or Howard is a "black school", and you may lump them in as community college++, but, regardless, a BA is a BA when it comes to the credential. Further, he said, he got his people through, in four years, at lower cost than the white schools, that he described as only wanting a sufficient number of black faces out on the campus to make the white liberals feel good about it while sticking them with six years of student loan debt and no degree.

I could not fault him for wanting the best for his people; people should want the best for their own people.

Anonymous Faceless June 02, 2016 3:47 PM  

RedJack wrote: I disagree. The name on the the diploma means something. You are buying the brand of the school. The brand of a local CC is not worth much compared to that of a major school. Employers will look at that brand. Not saying an Ivy is ever a good idea, but most CC's are not going to advance your career path.


You are correct that the name means something. The inequality is, of course:

Degree from Ivy
worth more than
Degree from "Public Ivy"
worth more than
Degree from BFE State Ag Tech
worth more than
Coursework from Ivy but no degree

They did her no favors by not steering to somebody who so needed to be emotionally coddled to an environment where she would be ignored. There are plenty of directional schools that would have coddled her sufficiently.

Blogger William Cotton June 02, 2016 3:48 PM  

Here is a link to an old article about Multiculturalism you might like

http://www.robinsoncurriculum.com/view/rc/s31p1000.h

Blogger Feather Blade June 02, 2016 3:56 PM  

@2 You know what would help "lectures be more effective"?

If the stupid undergrads had both ears on the lecturer and a notebook in hand, rather than one ear (or both!) plugged into the music on their phones, and Facebook open on their laptops.

Anonymous patrick kelly June 02, 2016 4:03 PM  

"Just say good job and move on. Don't give them the impression they're somehow superhuman because they can succeed in math and science. They're going to find out pretty quickly they aren't."

Yep. I succumbed to the same delusion and watch kids today do the same.

This girl is not a failure. B's and C's as a freshman at Columbia probably put her just above the middle of the pack. She was used to being near the top.

She's succeeded in acquiring on a fast-track some very important life lessons about what's important, necessary, and valuable in her life. It will likely take others in similar situations the whole 4 years and getting the degree to learn the same things. I hope she pays attention and applies it well. May she suffer some more quicker failures on the way to even more success.

Blogger Noah B June 02, 2016 4:08 PM  

Nayla Kidd. Sounds like a name with a glorious future in Pink SFF.

Blogger YIH June 02, 2016 4:09 PM  

Laz wrote:"Kidd wrote that she has no plans to return to school. Instead, she wants to make music and work on her writing and modeling careers."

3 to 1 she ends up a stripper.

Not a great market for dindus in strip clubs, it'll be pr0n.

Anonymous Stickwick June 02, 2016 4:10 PM  

Philalethes: I too noticed that her problem with Columbia was primarily emotional – she didn't feel all warm and fuzzy there. Because a girl is smart enough to do well in a STEM field doesn't mean she isn't a girl – who will starve in an environment geared to the male character.

I noticed that, too.

I went through a similar experience. I was in gifted programs in elementary school, skipped a grade in high school, studied in a rigorous program, undergrad was a skate on ice, and all along I got lots of attention for being Science Girl, etc. Then I got into a top-10 department for grad school, and hit the reality wall HARD.

These days, grad school is an entirely different experience than undergrad, especially a rigorous, world-class program. What I realized after an extremely stressful first year is that you either cultivate a grim determination to finish or you might as well just quit. Yes, it's lonely. Yes, it can be uninspiring at times. But the reality is that nobody is going to romance you just because you were hot stuff as an undergrad. Everyone was hot stuff as an undergrad. It just means you have the basic, raw skills necessary to survive, nothing more.

In my opinion, it is a huge mistake to romance girls -- or anyone, for that matter -- in undergrad science programs. The rigor should start in the freshman year, like it used to, to weed the weaker students out. It seems cruel to do so, but as Vox pointed out, it’s far less cruel than cheerleading someone along to a point where they squander their potential by overvaluing themselves.

Anonymous VFM 7699 June 02, 2016 4:13 PM  

All I see is an attention 'Ho with no real interest in science. Her stated goal is to pursue music and modeling. I am inclined to believe this would have happened at any decent computer science program.

Blogger Unknown June 02, 2016 4:15 PM  

This girl was the Token Black, and coasted in school on her innate skills. If she really was the superstar everyone thought she was, she would have taken the environment and work load of Colombia as a challenge, and knuckled down to be that superstar she thought she was. That is what winners do.
But no, she quit.
Some of the blame rests with her, as she made the decision to quit, but some of the blame also rests with her prior schooling. For not challenging her enough, and for screwing up her social development by conditioning her to require external gratification as a reward for her hard work. Her school never sought to nurture internal motivation to succeed, and because she did not have that internal drive, she failed as soon as she left the encouraging environment of her high school.

Blogger Unknown June 02, 2016 4:21 PM  

@32

As a hiring manager, any resume crossing my desk with an Ivy League degree gets instantly circular filed. After the destruction gender studies have wrought to the reputation of schools like Harvard and Colombia, the name you think buys so much prestige, implies the opposite. At least with me it does.

Blogger RobertT June 02, 2016 4:24 PM  

Whenever I hear of college freshman issues, i think of my on case. I had several scholarship offers, including one to Harvard, but since I had one that paid for everything to any school i wanted to attend, I went to a top party university to play sports. But I fell into the party crowd and drank my way through my Freshman year. 2.8. Lost my scholarship. Changed schools, changed majors. Ended up graduating with the highest grades. My freshman year is one of those 'thru a glass darkly' kind of things. Something I just had to go through.

In many ways, I wasn't that well suited for college. Maybe that's her problem as well.

Maybe she's having trouble adapting.

Blogger Noah B June 02, 2016 4:27 PM  

Guys, she got the highest score on a chemistry test out of all the 240 or fewer NAM's who took it. She's clearly an intellectual powerhouse who only struggled at Columbia because of racism.

Anonymous College Iz Hard, Barbie June 02, 2016 4:34 PM  

This reminds me of what happened to Debi Thomas, the Olympic ice skater (bronze medal winner). Thomas completed Stanford, entered medical school and became Dr. Thomas, orthopedic surgeon and then.... she just couldn't work with other doctors, and kept moving from job to job, then tried her own private practice, which failed after a while.
Now she lives unemployed in a trailer in Richlands, Virginia, with her unemployed fiancee. Thomas, too, had a hyper-achiever mother like Kidd's. I suspect that both of them were pushed to excel, to show the world what a black girl could do and be.
In Thomas' case, it seemed like she had it made: Stanford grad, Olympic athlete, Orthopedic surgeon.... But it seems like her social skills suffered in her drive to excel as an individual. In Kidd's case, it seems to me that she was promoted beyond her actual ability to succeed by people with good (?) intentions.

Blogger Bard June 02, 2016 4:36 PM  

Huh. Didn't even have to click the link to know she was Japanese. Boy was I surprised!

Blogger Salt June 02, 2016 4:38 PM  

VFM 7699 wrote:Her stated goal is to pursue music and modeling.

Growing up she excelled at science, was praised for her ability, and being a kid, went with the flow. That flow is not natural. Nature does not praise each and every day. It took the real lack of constant praise world of Columbia for her to achnowledge what she's known about herself for a long time.

Anyhow, she's better off doing what she actually wants to do than what everyone else expects of her.

Blogger Wanda Sherratt June 02, 2016 4:43 PM  

Anyone surprised that she was raised by a single mom?

No, but by now it's probably hardly even worth taking commenting on. It's more apt to highlight the young black person who comes from a normal family with a married mom and dad: they're such a minority now, it's actually noteworthy when you find one. (Despite what the commercials show us, where minority families are always portrayed as intact and upper middle class.) It's like making pointed comments about how poor people have "flat-screen TVs". Everyone has flat-screen TVs now. And cellphones. It's just normal.

Anonymous BGKB June 02, 2016 4:55 PM  

It's neither right nor fair to put the weight of a race on one young kid who happens to be an outlier

The problem is their outliers are in the normal range for Asians/white. Even the Journal of Blacks in Higher EDU has on their webpage AVG SAT BY RACE/INCOME with the poorest whites from families earning less than $20,000/yr having a 978 and the most successful blacks from families earning over $200,000/yr are a rounding error away at 981.

Guys, she got the highest score on a chemistry test out of all the 240 or fewer NAM's who took it

Even Bath House Barry's book talked about how if you seemed interested in learning people would heavily invest time in you hoping to get a good one. That's why Orca Windfree went with a small really expensive school in Africa that costs as much as teaching basics at hundreds of other schools, because she knows how small a group of educate able blacks there is and she is hoping for a pupil that won't embarrass her on the world stage.

Kidd said, “I didn’t feel inspired.Who the fuck cares if you are inspired or not.

She had her hand held, and graded on a curve for the entire (how long it took)years of high school. If she was really smart she would have skipped a grade.

"Even if you’re a stripper, you’re gonna be the best stripper out there."

Did she seriously say that and not know in a few years time that will be impossible?

Her mother was a "successful" academic.

I would never have guessed that the mom helped her with homework.

Here is a link to an old article about Multiculturalism you might like

http://www.robinsoncurriculum.com/view/rc/s31p1000.h 404 bad link

Blogger CJ June 02, 2016 5:08 PM  

#32 RedJack

I believe Thales was talking up the idea of getting most of your first and second year courses/credits at a community/junior college and then transferring to a university. If not, correct me ...) This is actually a pretty good idea for more reasons than money, and more people should consider it. Ditto for the possibility of taking first-year college courses in high school.

Blogger Ingot9455 June 02, 2016 5:08 PM  

What you do in college-level chemistry is very very different from what you do in high-school level chemistry. And if you go into chemical engineering (they have a program of that at Columbia, apparently) there's another big leap.

She was just doing textbook work at home, which anyone reasonably smart could do at the high-school level.

Anonymous Stickwick June 02, 2016 5:24 PM  

Holy crap, I just realized this young woman was complaining about the rigor of undergrad, not grad school. The problem here seems to be that she was way over-praised in school, and she assumed university was going to just be a continuation of that. It most certainly is not.

That said, some people just need to wait and mature a bit. Some students benefit from working for a few years, rather than launching straight into university. Or, as Vox said, going to a second-tier school rather than a place like Columbia.

Blogger Snidely Whiplash June 02, 2016 5:31 PM  

Stickwick wrote:I just realized this young woman was complaining about the rigor of undergrad,

not so much the rigor. She acknowledges herself that she was simply not doing the work. It was the emotional environment that was her problem.

Probably not just the lack of a constant refrain of "Isn't Nyla so SMART!!!", but also being in an environment where being Black has a social context and meaning. In other words, being Black, she was expected to be a party girl/whore/affimative action idiot/activist, and slid into the role expected of her. She seems to have too much self-respect to have become a racial activist, so better than NK Jemison at least.

Anonymous Wanderer June 02, 2016 5:42 PM  

These measures were prompted by a sense of alienation from Columbia and its expectations, Kidd wrote. Since arriving in college two years ago, she ceased to be the academic all-star that she had been all of her life.

Columbia is so racist for failing to provide a welcoming safe space for this potential rocket surgeon.

Anonymous Opus June 02, 2016 5:42 PM  

I was for a while romantically linked to a young Jewish woman who told me that she had found school a breeze but when she attended a certain liberal arts college to read Chemistry (one of the so-called Seven sisters) she discovered that her abilities were ordinary. She was however a very bright girl though that did not prevent her from sabotaging her career (a liking for black cock) and subsequently making a train-wreck of her life. All rather sad.

I was never accepted for any University.

Blogger VFM #7634 June 02, 2016 5:47 PM  

It's more apt to highlight the young black person who comes from a normal family with a married mom and dad: they're such a minority now, it's actually noteworthy when you find one.

@49 Wanda Sherratt
There are intact black families, but they're usually immigrants.

Blogger Joshua Sinistar June 02, 2016 5:52 PM  

The United Negro College Farce. Sending niggers who hate school to four more years of school. $100,000 is a terrible thing to waste. Use your money for your own race. Its NOT THE STONE AGE ANYMORE.

Blogger Mastermind June 02, 2016 5:56 PM  

I'm not sure it's really an affirmative action issue (except in regards to the media making a story of this that they would never make of a white kid in a similar situation). I've had college classes with 6 people in them and college classes with 40 and the difference is like heaven and earth, even though I'm generally a loner and just fine with not talking to anybody. Some people cannot function without tight social relationships and shut down completely when moved from a friendlier and more intimate high school environment to the soulless ivy league grind.

Blogger RobertT June 02, 2016 5:59 PM  

Although it could just be SJW reaction to failure. She certainly is pouty faced.

Blogger RobertT June 02, 2016 6:00 PM  

Although it could just be SJW reaction to failure. She certainly is pouty faced.

Blogger JACIII June 02, 2016 6:03 PM  

Public University has completely lost its mission to prepare young people for their life's work.

It's the chicks. Start paying attention to nursing programs - they often have a cycle (ahem) wherein the administrators decide they are or want to be an "elite" "exclusive" program and so begin teaching management instead of skills and practical knowledge and/or they begin only accepting top tier applicants. Pretty soon graduates start failing boards or the state notices a nursing shortage due to a too low replacement rate. People get fired, things get back on track, repeat.

Blogger Noah B June 02, 2016 6:07 PM  

Saw her pic. Stripper is right out.

Blogger Bob Loblaw June 02, 2016 6:23 PM  

Can she not do her work unless she is constantly being petted and fawned over?

It's not her fault - there's a whole generation of girls that have been raised to expect constant positive feedback regardless of circumstances. Probably the only advantage the boys have (primarily white boys) is they're not used to receiving praise unless they actually accomplish something.

The real question is why she dropped out of school instead of transferring to sociology or business like the rest of the people drummed out of STEM programs.

Anonymous Barbequetta Chickendra Jone June 02, 2016 6:29 PM  

Gurl did good. Get her Obamaphone.

Blogger Miss Carnivorous June 02, 2016 6:36 PM  

Big fish, small pond. Same thing happened to me in the sixth grade. I moved back to Oakland, CA (I was born there, but we moved a lot, Navy brat here) with my newly single mom. I totally dominated the class I was put in. I ran roughshod over all of my classmates. The teacher of that class, tired of my dominance, transferred me to an "accelerated" class. Nevermore did I dominate. I became an average, to below average, member of that class. A valuable lesson to learn, and a big comeuppance.

Blogger Jon Bromfield June 02, 2016 6:42 PM  

tz @ 24

Same thing happened to me. A math whiz until pre-calculus in high school. Newly minted, fresh out of college math teacher with the remarkable ability to drain all the wonder, beauty and glory out of math. It was like taking a music class where the teacher taught the rules of notation, transposition and harmonic theory - and never played any music. He destroyed many other STEM kids in that one year, ended up teaching for another 40 years at the same high school. Sad to think of how many embryonic scientists and engineers the incompetent dullard strangled in the crib.

Anonymous Wanderer June 02, 2016 6:46 PM  

At last! People are willing to criticize blacks:

I'm more of a special snowflake than you are.

Anonymous Shitavious Maximus June 02, 2016 7:00 PM  

Barbequetta:
Gurl did good. Get her Obamaphone

Dat be gnom aza 'sailfaoam', ho.

Anonymous Baseball Savant June 02, 2016 7:01 PM  

Couldn't we look at this another way? The girl wants to be a model/stripper. Doesn't this seemingly imply she finally woke up and said, "The only way I can marry up is to utilize my looks, sexual skills and no man in his right mind is going to want some girl who is good at science. I need to disappear and remake myself into a sexy vixen in order to potentially live a life of luxury and ease. The more time I put in at Columbia, the worse off I actually am!"

Anonymous nymous872 June 02, 2016 7:10 PM  

"She probably would have been a star at a second-tier school. But it's not only unreasonable, it is cruel to be throwing kids like this into situations where mediocrity is the best possible outcome and failure is the most probable one."

This is exactly one of the main points made in "The Bell Curve" and which was mostly ignored by the people too busy calling Charles Murray a raaasist to read the book.

Blogger eharmonica June 02, 2016 7:22 PM  

She attended the Thacher School, a small, private school in bucolic Ojai, CA. She then moved to the cold, unfeeling shit-hole that is NYC. If she is anything like me, she was rightfully shocked at how poor the lectures were (I was an EE at UCLA) and how shitty people are to each other in NYC.

I give her credit for stepping out.

Blogger Wanda Sherratt June 02, 2016 7:28 PM  

#53 Stickwick: "That said, some people just need to wait and mature a bit."

Maturity does seem to be a big issue in this particular case. She didn't burn out through overwork and have a breakdown. Her "escape" was carefully planned and methodically carried out. To me, it sounded like a successful "running away from home" scheme, and that's a temptation most people outgrow before they get to college. Running away to avoid problems rather than staying in place, facing and solving them is pretty much a classic example of immaturity.

Anonymous Barbequetta Chickendra Jone June 02, 2016 7:54 PM  

You get yall axter Obamaphone b4 Mr. Drummond get in the presidint.

OpenID denektenorsk June 02, 2016 8:11 PM  

Dare I say it, we don't need anymore people (regardless of gender) who need to "feel welcome" in STEM. In the real world you won't have a high school professor spoon feeding you the answers/"experiments". Ideally you do your own work and figure problems out on your own.

Blogger Matamoros June 02, 2016 8:45 PM  

Didn't get stroked, didn't get special treatment, didn't get the star on the forehead. Poor darling.

Probably needed a safe space.

Compete in a man's world, live by a man's pain and struggle to excel.

Blogger Kristophr June 02, 2016 8:55 PM  

Going into any university straight out of high school is a mistake, in my opinion. A few years working in the real world ( or even a stint in the military ) will see to it that some dumb-arsed kid's head is screwed on tighter, and is more able to hack adult academic work.

Blogger clk June 02, 2016 9:07 PM  

I think this whole situation is blown out of proportion.... simply the wrong college.. it happens all the time, especially at the ivy league and tier 1 schools... these research schools are often terrible in teaching under grad stem... thats why the local state school is better ... teachers dedicated to teaching...

Blogger Harold June 02, 2016 9:32 PM  

I first read of it happening at California Institute of Technology, but it's probably true of every selective school. At the end of the first semester, half the class finds themselves in the lower 50% academically for the first time in their lives.

And in all likelihood, the real truth is 90% of them probably find themselves in the lower 90% for the first time in their lives.

The real outliers in public schools probably never get to college. They bail out of formal education from boredom, or start hanging with the druggies due to boredom and wed themselves out by selectively destroying their brain cells to bring them down to average. Public schools simply aren't geared up for intelligent outliers. Being #1 when your closest competition is a standard deviation behind you in intelligence isn't a great competitive feat. Running into real competition is a shock.

Blogger Joshua Sinistar June 02, 2016 10:03 PM  

Colleges Today discriminate against thinkers. Most of the student body is jews, teachers' pets, tokens, sell-outs, legacies and foreigners paying most of what isn't covered by loans and grants. Its a dirty business. Tenured professors are frauds and layabouts demurring to administrators, making grad students teach their classes and justifying their positions by righting phony baloney grant papers full of bogus claims and shady studies.
They don't want leaders or students who rock the boat. The National Honor Society weeds out freethinkers and rogue individualists and rounds up every ass-kisser and sycophant that ever polished an apple for their teachers. Suck-ups and conformists get the red carpet treatment at college tour trips. Only the nigger retards who play with balls get better treatment than the weak-kneed sycophant wanting his Golden Ticket from Silly Wonker.

OpenID luciussomesuch June 02, 2016 10:18 PM  

"In other words, being Black, she was expected to be a party girl/whore/affimative action idiot/activist, and slid into the role expected of her. She seems to have too much self-respect to have become a racial activist, so better than NK Jemison at least."

--Gentlemen, if I am to believe my lying eyes, this girl has two nose rings.

(or at least, some pics show a pierced nostril on her right, others a septum ring. Maybe she doesn't wear both at once?]

Blogger Kentucky Packrat June 02, 2016 11:11 PM  

I had a teacher look at me in high school and tell me "At X County, you are a big fish in a very small pond. You will go to college, and you will be a small fish in a big pond. Don't pretend you can cruise there."

I cruised occasionally, and got Ds for it in 2 classes (and replaced a third with a retake), but I never did completely fail out for it.

Blogger Michael Maier June 02, 2016 11:15 PM  

Yeah... She could be a stripper... in a dive near the town's MLK Blvd where whites don't go.

Everyone one of the black waitresses at TWIN PEAKS here in Indianapolis are far better looking.

Blogger vtah June 02, 2016 11:44 PM  

growing up in our schools, a black kid that wasn't a fuck up would be zeroed in upon by faculty to be held up above the rest. i had a half-black friend like this and she was told she was the brightest and best writer, EVER. she was actually mediocre and we all said as much behind her back, partly because we knew we were put down so she could be propped up. they teachers got her scholarships for university and everything. she couldn't finish her j-school degree but went to write for the local paper and was relegated to some lame section. her ego was bruised. how did they not realize how awesome she was? racism of course. she is now suing the paper for wrongful discrimination after they fired her bitter and lazy ass.

as far as science goes. the universities are designed to test for genius and to weed out most everyone else. organic chemistry, calculus and chemistry are the most failed classes at the university i went to. you do not get participation trophies and you are a faceless number until you get into upper division where you've clearly proven yourself and the classes become very small. science and math are probably the last bastions of meritocracy on campuses.

even those that get affirmative actioned into medical school struggle. my husband had multiple black classmates that got held behind and didn't not graduate with the class they entered with. super duper embarrassing!

affirmative action is a racist cruel way to treat people.

Blogger flyingtiger June 03, 2016 12:44 AM  

At one alumni banquet, one of the brothers talked about one of his success story. He described how he motivated a student to study and he eventual earn a scholarship at a big name college. This student graduated a year ahead of me. I went to a community college because that is all I could afford. I was surprised to see this student. He flunked out of the big name college. He was also flunking at the CC. Talking to him, I discovered his problem. He never went to class!. He found them boring. He needed external motivation to do this. I followed my father's advice and went to class. That is how I graduated from college. That is the advice I give everyone.
This girl likes attention. I bet she is on a live cam site right now.

Blogger Alec Rawls June 03, 2016 1:01 AM  

Most university teaching us horrible, with none of the incremental learning and practice that allows focused learning to proceed quickly. As the MOOCs continue to improve they will soon be universally superior and a simple regime of competency testing will become a vastly better predictor of performance than any degree, at which point our leftist-dominated academia will cease to exist, to the great benefit of all mankind.

The girl in this story seems to have shown the ability to reach some useful level of competency in the right learning environment and before long there will be an app for that, tailored to girlish needs. It is no slam on girls that they respond to approval. It makes them teachable and is an asset, the same way boys' competitiveness drives boys to learn in a competitive school environment, or would, if competitiveness wasn't being purged from our girl-centric schools.

Blogger Noah B June 03, 2016 1:27 AM  

I found intro biology to be a difficult course because it was all about rote memorization and not about learning new concepts and techniques, and that bored the hell out of me.

Blogger Shimshon June 03, 2016 2:21 AM  

This reminds me a bit of a girl I knew in college. She was a fellow Cognitive Science student and upon graduating got a great job offer at THE unicorn of the day (Go Corp). Within a year she burned out completely. Decided she hated programming and left the field entirely. Spent at least some time teaching kindergarten, and pursued an interest in music and drumming.

She was not an affirmative action student, and this was before the Women in STEM thing became a total craze. But I think it's still instructive.

Anonymous Discard June 03, 2016 6:26 AM  

55. Wanderer: "Rocket surgeon". Nyuk nyuk nyuk, Good one.

Anonymous Moonbear June 03, 2016 7:10 AM  

I "failed" grade school with 137 IQ. (Mensa test)
Care to guess if my mom cared about me, or if she was a single mom?

Anonymous Laz June 03, 2016 7:49 AM  

"Colleges Today discriminate against thinkers. Most of the student body is jews, teachers' pets, tokens, sell-outs, legacies and foreigners paying most of what isn't covered by loans and grants."

Don't forget the felons who get a free ride.

Blogger dc.sunsets June 03, 2016 11:46 AM  

WTF tiny, Nowheresville high schools did all these commenters go to where they were Star Pupil but then crashed at university?

Being in the top 1% of a mostly white h.s. with a 400 student graduating class implies an IQ above 135, more than high enough to do well at any college including the Ivies.

My middle son was typical; >99.5th percentile in h.s., finished a BS in mechanical engineering at State U. in 7 semesters (4.0 gpa) and six years after graduation is a senior engineer at a major firm, already with a major international patent applied for.

Aptitude first, but work ethic & dedication are not optional. The girl in this article lacked the latter for sure no matter how many assertions to the contrary are made.

No one cares how smart you are, all that matters is what. you. do.

Blogger dc.sunsets June 03, 2016 11:57 AM  

This girl is a victim of the ongoing search for the Magic Negro.

You know...the example that finally proves the Cult's thesis of Blank Slate, that proves that the imperfections of the world are entirely due to Evil White Racism and confirms the plot of every TV show & movie cranked out by Hollywood's Ministry of Truth.

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Blogger justaguy June 03, 2016 8:16 PM  

In undergraduate STEM, bad teachers don't really matter. If you have the brainpower to be an engineer (at least +1 SD) then you can learn easily enough for the first two years as long as there is some teaching. The weed-out courses are meant to catch the unmotivated but not gifted students. In some STEM majors, the higher level courses require decent teaching or higher brainpower, and at the Ivies, some of the top STEM courses definitely require both.

Now humanities and other self-affirming courses that require agreement with the professor are another issue, but they don't appear to be the issue with former STEM wannabe above.

Blogger The Overgrown Hobbit June 04, 2016 1:09 AM  

We had this discussion with yard ape. "When you screw up," we told her, "what happens? Do you get in trouble? Do your parents make you fix it and get it right?"

Yes to all of those things. On the other hand if you are black , you are told that the reason you screwed up is because of institutionalised racism. Or prejudice. Or white people. Or something like that.

So, if you are a you are white when you make mistakes, you get called on them, and you are made to fix them.

You are black, you are told to blame everyone else .

And that, boys and girls, is what white privilege looks like.

You could not create a black underclass better if you wrote a business plan for it.

Anonymous Ominous Cowherd June 04, 2016 12:43 PM  

@50 BGKB The corrected link seems to be:
http://www.robinsoncurriculum.com/view/rc/s31p1000.htm

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