ALL BLOG POSTS AND COMMENTS COPYRIGHT (C) 2003-2018 VOX DAY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION IS EXPRESSLY PROHIBITED.

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Corporate fraud

I imagine there are probably a lot of violations that merit investigation, particularly among the Trump-hating technology companies.
The U.S. Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission are investigating whether Apple Inc. violated securities laws concerning its disclosures about a software update that slowed older iPhone models, according to people familiar with the matter.

The government has requested information from the company, according to the people, who asked not to be named because the probe is private. The inquiry is in early stages, they cautioned, and it’s too soon to conclude any enforcement will follow.... Several weeks ago, the company admitted to slowing down the performance of older iPhones models to make their batteries last longer. Apple released a software update early in 2017 that throttled older iPhones, but didn’t specify that the action slowed the devices. In December, Apple apologized for not clearly communicating this information and vowed to release another update to mitigate the concern.
What, they think everyone forgot how Clinton and Obama audited and investigated conservative organizations and corporations?

Labels: ,

59 Comments:

Blogger bob kek mando January 30, 2018 4:12 PM  

OT, Peterson explains the Gamma from a Jungian perspective:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ictUbyRBW6Y

ie - the Gamma would be one who has refused to integrate his shadow and, thus, his persona is false.

Blogger Longtime Lurker January 30, 2018 4:28 PM  

Apple's leadership confused the company's customer base with the Democratic Party.

Oopsie.

Anonymous Buyer’s Remorse January 30, 2018 4:29 PM  

It is disgusting that Trump is targeting the free market with abuse over petty revenge. The GOP is being held hostage by anti-capitalist union voters in Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin. These white working class voters all voted for Obama. Now they support Trump but hate the free market and the Constitution. Another case in point is the $1 trillion dollars Trump wants to spend on infrastructure. Can you say public works/FDR socialism?

Blogger Andrew January 30, 2018 4:29 PM  

They must be made to play by their own rules. Using winning tactics doesn't make you like the enemy.

Will the right finally learn this?

Anonymous BBGKB January 30, 2018 4:31 PM  

TRUMP should have the IRS target a shitlib org for every conservative targeted.

Anonymous veryfunnyminion January 30, 2018 4:37 PM  

TRUMP should target the IRS.

FIFY :)

Blogger Anno Ruse January 30, 2018 4:41 PM  

What amuses me mostly is when the media servants can't resist a tasty morsel and release the story with the minimal amount of spin. Apple? Doing something wrong? Oy vey, as long as it's not CURRENT MANIPULATION... oh, it is? I nevah could've predicted this!

I'll stick to my 1996 hard-to-text but easy-to-send messages. A few more buttons pressed and you don't worry if the Russians are scanning your mp3s.

Blogger pyrrhus January 30, 2018 4:44 PM  

GE, which has been fiddling the books every since Jack Welch took over, now facing IRS probe after suddenly losing $22 billion in its insurance subsidiary...

Blogger Stephen Davenport January 30, 2018 4:46 PM  

Microsoft did it a few years ago as well, with their Xbox 360. They did a mandatory update and afterwards you could not load a game from the game disk. To fix it, you had to mail the Xbox to Microsoft and they would fix it for $100. This is about the time the Xbox 1 came out. It is a scam to get you to buy their newer product and should be illegal.

Blogger tuberman January 30, 2018 4:51 PM  

I use to have some high end IT contractor friends who worked briefly for the IRS. They told me that I would not believe the cars sitting in the IRS's parking lot. EXPENSIVE!

Anonymous Kevin January 30, 2018 4:52 PM  

This is a non issue. Sad the govt getting involved and further embarrassing themselves just like every lawyer chasing money in this. Never going to prove harm. It’s all a nothing burger. It’s a complicated battery management issue that you would no more explain to end users than you would if you changed memory management.

Anonymous Russell Newquist January 30, 2018 4:52 PM  

There have been a number of stories going around about Trump threatening to nationalize 5G as well. Everyone's so distracted by the subject of the actual story that they fail to see it for what it is: Trump hitting openly hostile tech, deeply meddlesome companies with warnings to knock it off or face the consequences. Hardball.

Blogger James Dixon January 30, 2018 5:05 PM  

> Never going to prove harm.

Harm has already been demonstrated. The question is whether it's actionable or not.

> There have been a number of stories going around about Trump threatening to nationalize 5G as well.

If he does it as part of his rural infrastructure plans, there is more than ample precedent. Whether it's a good idea or not is another matter. But as the law currently stands the spectrum is the government's to allocate as needed for the public good.

Anonymous CrystalBlue January 30, 2018 5:08 PM  

Stephen Davenport wrote:It is a scam to get you to buy their newer product and should be illegal.

BS. Batteries degrade over time. All Apple did was change the software so that if it detects that a battery cannot supply the necessary load, it slows the CPU down so that demand matches available power.

It's no different than having a smart flashlight that automatically dims the light as the battery gets weaker, instead of providing no light at all. Replace the battery.

Fake news. Irresponsible muckraking.

Blogger tuberman January 30, 2018 5:12 PM  

Let's see, "...deeply meddlesome companies"

I like specifics, as in they constantly censor the Right in every way possible, and trend Narrative propaganda, in every possible way that they can, and are in fact tools for the Globalist Left, as they get lots of laundered money to "play the game."

Blogger tuberman January 30, 2018 5:16 PM  

"Whether it's a good idea or not is another matter."

If it cuts Globalist money strings and disempowers the Leftists, short term, it is great. Correct if necessary after bringing Traitors down.

Blogger Ransom Smith January 30, 2018 5:17 PM  

BS. Batteries degrade over time. All Apple did was change the software so that if it detects that a battery cannot supply the necessary load, it slows the CPU down so that demand matches available power.
Apple fanboy? Or shill?
Either way, it would have been zero effort for Apple to notify the customers of the software reason and encourage getting a replacement battery at the nearest Apple store

Blogger Lazarus January 30, 2018 5:17 PM  

@13

All Apple did was change the software so that if it detects that a battery cannot supply the necessary load, it slows the CPU down so that demand matches available power.

The part you left out was without notifying their customers.

Blogger Stg58/Animal Mother January 30, 2018 5:18 PM  

I just hate it when people who richly deserve it are housed on their own petard.

Have they never read the Old Testament? Wollstonecraft Shelley?

Blogger Danby January 30, 2018 5:18 PM  

Kevin wrote:It’s a complicated battery management issue that you would no more explain to end users than you would if you changed memory management.
Bullshit. It's not complex at all.
"We glued the phone together so the battery can't be replaced. Now we're screwing your phone up to try to get you to buy a new iPhone."

Blogger Chris Mallory January 30, 2018 5:25 PM  

Buyer’s Remorse wrote:It is disgusting that Trump is targeting the free market with abuse over petty revenge. The GOP is being held hostage by anti-capitalist union voters in Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin. These white working class voters all voted for Obama. Now they support Trump but hate the free market and the Constitution. Another case in point is the $1 trillion dollars Trump wants to spend on infrastructure. Can you say public works/FDR socialism?

Next thing you know Trump is going to deport your nanny and the guy who mows your yard. How dare the US government look out for American citizens.

Blogger Dave January 30, 2018 5:26 PM  

No need to cruise IRS' parking lots with this data at your fingertips:

https://www.openthebooks.com/fox_news_how_much_is_that_federal_salary_now_you_and_all_taxpayers_can_help_drain_the_swamp_/

Blogger Ceerilan January 30, 2018 5:28 PM  

@13

There are many ways to save power in a phone, and slowing the clock speed is only one way. Apple simply chose to lie to its consumer base to encourage more sales of new products, rather than coming out with several options for their customers. That's not how a trustworthy company acts.

Blogger Stg58/Animal Mother January 30, 2018 5:29 PM  

Vox,

Live blog thread for SOTU? Scotch and a cigar are standing by. And popcorn as well.

Blogger Stg58/Animal Mother January 30, 2018 5:29 PM  

http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2018/01/30/rep-paul-gosar-ive-asked-capitol-police-jeff-sessions-to-arrest-any-illegal-aliens-attending-trumps-sotu/

COULD GET SPICY

Blogger Mr.MantraMan January 30, 2018 5:30 PM  

Isn't that the whole point of software updates to slow the device down?

Blogger VD January 30, 2018 5:33 PM  

Fake news. Irresponsible muckraking.

Shut up, Apple shill. You're not fooling anyone.

Blogger VD January 30, 2018 5:34 PM  

It’s a complicated battery management issue that you would no more explain to end users than you would if you changed memory management.

Apple already admitted wrongdoing, Macintosser.

Blogger Stg58/Animal Mother January 30, 2018 5:40 PM  

APPLE CULTIST GONNA CULTIST.

Anonymous Looking Glass January 30, 2018 5:54 PM  

We got a Disney shill the other week, now an Apple shill. Hmm, I guess VP is getting large enough reach in some metrics to get the non-political information scans.

It's also quite sad everyone is now so used to political shills that the corporate ones seem like target practice. It's also a little insulting, since they're always so weak at it. "Try harder", comes to mind.

Blogger Azure Amaranthine January 30, 2018 6:01 PM  

"Isn't that the whole point of software updates to slow the device down?"

Generally? Yes. Can't even begin to relate how many different devices update and then leave either the zipped version of the new files or the old filest entire behind in the device memory. Would automatically deleting that scuzz at the end of an update (or heck, even if just the versions before the last one, in case a rollback is needed) kill them? Apparently yes.

I have yet to have a single device not be eventually slowed down by "updates" that do completely unnecessary things/download manufacturer-mandated shovelware. On the other hand, I have several devices whose auto-updating I castrated with the digital equivalent of a battleaxe. I do controlled updates once a month or so and never had any problems. Vulnerabilities my butt.

Anonymous Anonymous January 30, 2018 6:19 PM  

On the other hand Apple is onshoring 250 billion, paying $38 billion in taxes and promised some 20k jobs in the next however many years. All of which makes Trump look good.

The real issue here is the FTC, FCC, DoJ are small fry next to Sakdden or Cravath and the Apple warchest. And if FedGov goes after Apple it means Google, Facebook, and whoever else gets to go nuts.

WB

Blogger Ahärôwn January 30, 2018 6:59 PM  

VD wrote:
Apple already admitted wrongdoing, Macintosser.


It would appear that Vox is a PC user :D

Blogger James Dixon January 30, 2018 7:27 PM  

> BS. Batteries degrade over time. All Apple did was change the software so that if it detects that a battery cannot supply the necessary load, it slows the CPU down so that demand matches available power.

Rather than informing them that their batteries, which in many cases were still under warranty, should be replaced.

Anonymous Causal Lurker January 30, 2018 7:29 PM  

No, the most Supreme Dark Lord's assembler code self-assembles, for his amusement.

Stay Dark, my Lords. :)

I wonder which Apple genius got the value engineering award for production cost reduction, by making internal parts and battery non-replaceable and the case a glued item. Everything looks cute and modern, until something breaks. Then the whole things goes into "/etc/trash."

Blogger Edward Dunai January 30, 2018 8:11 PM  

Actually making the batteries non-replaceable is becoming industry standard in order to meet the requirements for water and dust proofing of high end phones. You know how phones can now survive getting dunked in water or such? That feature is due to the sealed nature of the case, and in order to maintain the seal to the levels required there cannot be any unneeded openings in the case itself. It's far easier to seal around jacks, microphones, charge points, etc that are 'static' than it is to seal a removable panel to allow changing out batteries.

Note that even 'fixed' batteries can be replaced, it just requires professional equipment and will void equipment warranties to attempt. Since the phones which are having this issue are past the end-date of any equipment warranty affected users could easily bring it in to a local phone repair shop (or Batteries Plus) and they'll take care of it, often with their own limited warranty on the work. At that point, no longer detecting the voltage drop off of a weakened battery, the phone should go back to full power.

Blogger Danby January 30, 2018 8:29 PM  

Edward Dunai wrote:Actually making the batteries non-replaceable is becoming industry standard in order to meet the requirements for water and dust proofing of high end phones. You know how phones can now survive getting dunked in water or such? That feature is due to the sealed nature of the case, and in order to maintain the seal to the levels required there cannot be any unneeded openings in the case itself.
Acshually, that's a lie

Blogger Danby January 30, 2018 8:30 PM  

The day after my wife's Verizon phone went off contract, it downloaded a massive (1.6GB) update, and since then it has been unable to maintain a charge for more than 6 hours, or 1 hour in use.

I'm sure the timing is just coincidental.

Blogger Edward Dunai January 30, 2018 8:40 PM  

Danby wrote:Acshually, that's a lie

Oh really... and your source for this statement is what precisely? Do note that Apple is not alone in switching to fixed batteries. Beyond simple dust and water proofing this also allows for larger capacity batteries in the same or less unit volume (vital for modern slimmer phones) by eliminating the physical connectors and cradles required to support replaceable batteries.

Anonymous CoolHand January 30, 2018 9:03 PM  

VD wrote:...Macintosser.

That is a 6th grade level insult that was nonetheless perfect for this particular exchange.

It's like you have a seventh sense that allows you to deploy the perfect insult at any given time. Perhaps an overdeveloped insult lobe in your brain?

Cruelty Artist indeed.

Blogger tz January 30, 2018 9:08 PM  

This is an Apple. Actually it is a Lemon. Don Lemon.

Tim(e) to Cook Desert.

Anonymous Avalanche January 30, 2018 10:24 PM  

09 "To fix it, you had to mail the Xbox to Microsoft and they would fix it for $100. This is about the time the Xbox 1 came out. It is a scam to get you to buy their newer product and should be illegal."

They've just done it again. Late last year, I bought a new Ryzen based machine -- to run (to keep running!) Win 7 Pro. (I'm figuring by 2020, when MS quits supporting Win7, EITHER there will be some whole new way of running computers, or I'll have to switch to Linux!) It's been purring along, happily accepting my desultory preparation to switch over from the older machine -- "suddenly" it will not update Windows AT ALL! Pissy little error message from them that the 'hardware is designed for the newer Windows, so they won't let me have the security updates. If I want them, I must upgrade to Win 10.'

I don't NEED the fancy stuff Ryzen can do. (It's a mid-grade gaming machine from a gaming computer maker (CyberPower PC) that I don't use for gaming -- I always buy a bigger faster beastie for my main computer!) Everyone with Kaby Lake is REALLY pissed! Some guy wrote a workaround- - which MS has already hamstrung.

(Actually going to look into running Win7 on a VM -- some guys were suggesting that might do -- but I don't know how to do that yet either!)

9th-level of hell for Microsoft!!

Blogger Jack Amok January 30, 2018 11:33 PM  

Yes. Can't even begin to relate how many different devices update and then leave either the zipped version of the new files or the old filest entire behind

Back around the turn of the century, when the last guy to actually give a damn about making Windows better ran the division, one of the things he wanted to do was figure out why computers suffered such perf degradation over time, and make the OS self-healing for that. I was definitely interested and angling to be in charge of the project.

Sadly, he lost his political war and was replace by someone shoving features, features, features, and that effort when down the drain. But before it did, I discovered three major causes of system slowdown:

1 - services bloat. Way too many apps decided to install a "service" (if you're old enough, you might call them a daemon). And even if you never ran the app again, or even if you uninstalled it, it would often leave the service around, still running in the background, still consuming CPU cycles and memory. Over time, these zombie services gradually ate up your processing power.

2 - Registry bloat. In addition to installing services, everything registered a bunch of... things... in the Registry (almost certainly the worst designed part of Windows). Again, even if you never ran the app again, or even if you uninstalled it, typically it would leave its registry entries behind. Unfortunately, the registry was where everything had to look to find information about what service, dll, or application to load to handle various things, and as the registry got bloated, lookup times grew longer and longer.

3 - Accumulation of bad sectors on the hard drive. Basically made defragging a disk less and less effective, as the bad sectors created "hard" fragmentation of the disk - you couldn't "move" the bad sectors to create more free space.

FWIW. Tech has for a long time been looked at as ephemeral, throw-away, short-time-frame, and the idea of designing something to last is... unconventional for a lot of folks.

Blogger ChangYeeFong January 30, 2018 11:54 PM  

Sometimes I wonder if deep down inside, all the Tech companies and a management is afraid they would make themselves obsolete if they do this.

One of the factors to the 1929 stock market crash is because people could only buy so many consumer items in a year and the market had reached saturation.

Blogger bob kek mando January 30, 2018 11:59 PM  

speaking of corporate fraud, the opioid epidemic being entirely manufactured by "legitimate" pharmaceutical companies is starting to go mainstream.

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/01/drug-companies-submerged-wv-in-opioids-one-town-of-3000-got-21-million-pills/

Blogger Danby January 31, 2018 12:06 AM  

Edward Dunai wrote:and your source for this statement is what precisely?
15 years in the cellular industry, currently working for the largest wireless company in the country.
And what's your credential? You took electronics 101 at the local community college?

Anonymous Ryan G January 31, 2018 1:26 AM  

@43 "FWIW. Tech has for a long time been looked at as ephemeral, throw-away, short-time-frame, and the idea of designing something to last is... unconventional for a lot of folks."

Truer words have never been said. I'd add that this is a problem that only gets worse with each passing year. This is due to what I call "The Library and Standards Cycle".

Every few years, someone, somewhere comes up with the Next Big Thing (tm) in software development. This thing is either a new library (a collection of computer code that is supposed to streamline various common tasks) or standards (coding styles, formatting standards, preferred software tools, etc). This Big Thing spreads through the industry via team-leads and senior engineers who keep up to date with all this stuff.

Sometimes, these Big Things speed up development or provide new tools for programmers to design flashy new features with. However, these are the exceptions. More often than not, these Big Things are the programmatic equivalent of arguing over the color of paint to put on an office wall. Regardless, they become a part of disparate code bases and become ingrained in all sorts of things. Eventually, unforeseen conflicts between The Big Thing and various realities in development lead disenfranchised developers into incorporating the best aspects of "The Big Thing" into The Next Big Thing. And so the cycle continues and the result is code that is harder to learn, more difficult to debug, and requires ever more specialized skill sets in order to effectively develop in it. Compounding this problem is that old code for mature systems is rarely scrapped in its entirety and is, instead, either gradually phased out or additional code is put into place that exists for no other purpose other than bridging the old stuff with the new. This results in software that can best be described as being like a car with the body of modern sedan, the engine of a model-T, and the transmission of some random SUV.

If you want to see the result of this, open any software on your computer (if you're running windows). Right now I have Firefox open. One tab is up and this page is the only thing on it. If I go to task manager, it's consuming 844 MB of memory - almost a GB. Years ago, this much memory would be taken up by some kind of video rendering software or a really high-end 3D game. Now it's what's required to render simple 1.4 MB website. That's bloat in action and it's found everywhere.

Oh, and for those of you with slower internet connections, you're in for a special treat in the future. The latest wonderful standard is to shovel megabytes worth of javascript across the wire into your computer and let your computer sort out all the overly complicated, pointlessly obtuse rendering code for the page. The reason for this is that all this bloat is starting to cost companies money in terms of increased hardware for servers. Rather than reverting to an earlier, simpler standard that is just as capable, they have instead elected to double down on the stupid and foist their problems onto you, their consumer.

I predict that by 2030, Windows will probably consume 20 GB of memory with "nothing running", take up half a terabyte of space, and bring even a top of the line gaming rig from today crawling to its needs.

Blogger Bob Loblaw January 31, 2018 1:26 AM  

pyrrhus wrote:GE, which has been fiddling the books every since Jack Welch took over, now facing IRS probe after suddenly losing $22 billion in its insurance subsidiary...

That's a lot of money, even for a company the size of GE.

Blogger Bob Loblaw January 31, 2018 1:35 AM  

Edward Dunai wrote:Actually making the batteries non-replaceable is becoming industry standard in order to meet the requirements for water and dust proofing of high end phones.

No. I have a relative who works in Apple phone design. It has nothing to do with water and dust proofing - the phone still isn't waterproof. If that were the goal they could add a gasket like engineers do in countless other gadgets.

The reason the battery is non-replaceable is you can't make a phone that thin with a replaceable battery without giving up some capacity. The battery itself is thicker because it needs to be in a tougher shell, and you need to make the phone more rigid and cover exposed electronics with a layer of plastic so people don't break their phones when they replace the battery.

Blogger Jack Amok January 31, 2018 2:06 AM  

this is a problem that only gets worse with each passing year. This is due to what I call "The Library and Standards Cycle".

Ain't it the truth. Software development has been turning circles for at least a couple of decades now. The whole idea of code reuse (aka libraries) has been perverted in an effort to save money and somehow get useful code out of monkeys.

The fads are abysmal and people don't recognize the perpetual problems. For instance, microservices are just another version of Dll Hell, but people still insist this silver bullet will solve the re-use problem.

And Java... it is best we not speak of Java.

Anonymous lawyer guy January 31, 2018 7:49 AM  

The Blue Crosses are a textbook antitrust violation, their main ruling council is actually presented as a group that holds the trademarks in trust for the state entities.

Trump could start there

Blogger James Dixon January 31, 2018 9:43 AM  

> (Actually going to look into running Win7 on a VM -- some guys were suggesting that might do -- but I don't know how to do that yet either!)

Install your desired version of Linux on the machine (I recommend Mint for those starting out) and install VirtualBox. Or you can upgrade to Windows 10 and also run Windows 7 in VirtualBox.

> 1 - services bloat. ... 2 - Registry bloat. ... 3 - Accumulation of bad sectors on the hard drive

All well known to Windows users. All fixed by a reformat and reinstall, which is the traditional fix to getting Windows up to speed again. A good registry/services cleanup tool would do wonders, but all of the ones out there that I've seen are junk. :(

Blogger Akulkis January 31, 2018 10:35 AM  

@36

"Actually making the batteries non-replaceable is becoming industry standard in order to meet the requirements for water and dust proofing of high end phones. You know how phones can now survive getting dunked in water or such? That feature is due to the sealed nature of the case, and in order to maintain the seal to the levels required there cannot be any unneeded openings in the case itself. It's far easier to seal around jacks, microphones, charge points, etc that are 'static' than it is to seal a removable panel to allow changing out batteries."

Or they could just use a $0.0001 seal with the cross-section of an o-ring. You know... .provides a water protection AND still have a device that is repairable and has replaceable batteries.

I have watches which are resistant down to 300m static water pressure, and yet not a single one of them has the entire thing glued together.

This technology has been available for DECADES.

Apple glues the parts permanently together because THEY WANT THE PRODUCT to have a limited life. PERIOD.

There's literally no excuse for gluing the whole thing together and making the battery non-replaceable, unless you take your entire customer base as a bunch of complete idiots without the slightest clue that there is ANY possible way to achieve the same end goal (water resistance) while still having a device which can be taken apart.

Blogger Akulkis January 31, 2018 10:47 AM  

@44

"One of the factors to the 1929 stock market crash is because people could only buy so many consumer items in a year and the market had reached saturation."

The biggest cause was the change in the securities law.

For decades, it was legal (but stupid) to buy stock on 1% margin (have the cash for 1 share, and buy 100, with the plan of selling when the stock goes up, and paying for the other 99 from the profits).

Well, Congress decided that was overly risky, and changed the securities law to 10% margin. This changed the game dramatically, and drying up demand in the stock market, and putting many of those who were in over their heads on 1% margin in hopeless debt which they could never pay off. Thus the suicides.

In retrospect, The law should have changed to 10% by slewing the margin rate over time.... say, upping the margin percentage by 1 point every 3 months or so, until the 10% goal was reached. Ah well.

Never bet more money than you can afford to lose.

Blogger Akulkis January 31, 2018 10:49 AM  

"speaking of corporate fraud, the opioid epidemic being entirely manufactured by "legitimate" pharmaceutical companies is starting to go mainstream."


And I believe it was Haaretz was PROUDLY proclaiming that the person making the biggest profit off of all of it is...

wait for it....


(((you guessed it))).

Blogger Akulkis January 31, 2018 10:55 AM  

"Ain't it the truth. Software development has been turning circles for at least a couple of decades now. The whole idea of code reuse (aka libraries) has been perverted in an effort to save money and somehow get useful code out of monkeys. "

You misspelled "Pakis and Indians (dot not feather)"

Blogger James Jones January 31, 2018 12:21 PM  

Apple did not tell people what they were doing. If they had, people could choose to have a new battery. It was about sales of later models. My daughter had an iPhone 4 and could barely scroll a web page. I bought her a later model because I thought Apple had throttled it with an update and there was nothing I could do. I did not make any connection (as most people haven't) between battery and performance - only the connection between battery state and the length of time it holds a charge.

Anonymous Ryan G January 31, 2018 1:21 PM  

@50 - The biggest culprit in my eyes is "Agile Development". In theory, this paradigm allows developers to quickly get a product to market, easily add new features over time, and gradually improve performance and stability. In practice, only the first two are usually achieved. The prevailing mentality is that people's computers are so fast these days that sweating over performance is a not worth it. The problem is that all the tiny compromises of development speed over execution performance eventually add up. I've worked at three different companies during my career and this is something I've seen happen at all three.

For example, there is a certain company that makes software for administrative use in hospitals. The entire web application (even though in most cases the software is installed on local servers...) has a page hierarchy that never goes more than 3 or 4 tiers deep. Most of the pages have the same layout, same UI elements, and are no more complicated than a bunch of text fields with a submit button. The whole thing could be done using nothing but HTML, CSS, PHP, and maybe a little javascript for some of the fancier UI elements. In other words, a semi-competent web developer could write the whole thing in Notepad and SQL Server, from scratch, in about two weeks. Yet this application is instead a hodgepodge of more than a dozen different technologies, including C# AND Java. Understanding the server-to-client call stack requires a flow chart that is more than 8 tiers deep.

The most mystifying thing about all of this is that in 99% of cases, using older technologies and techniques is more expedient from both a performance AND developer point of view. Writing something that dumps a user-specific value to the screen, like their name, in - say - ASP takes all of 10 seconds. Doing the same thing using Javascript/Angular JS/Java takes about two minutes.

@56 - "You misspelled "Pakis and Indians (dot not feather)" There is another thing I absolutely loathe - international teams. I swear, Hindi must not have any concept of spacing between words because everything they say comes out as one long word-sentence. Even though they speak and understand English just fine, they are extremely difficult to understand. Then, the quality of their work is absolutely abysmal. I've worked with two different Indian teams and I've lost track of all the times my team had to waste time correcting mistakes made on their end. The most maddening thing about that is that upper management jumps down *our* throats because we aren't putting the same level of gross output as they are.

Blogger bosscauser February 01, 2018 7:37 AM  

#MAGA

We won the argument...you lost. We're tired of the propaganda...

Can't have an economy without roads,and bridges...

And with your attitude we'll be back to Democrat control...

Post a Comment

Rules of the blog
Please do not comment as "Anonymous". Comments by "Anonymous" will be spammed.

<< Home

Newer Posts Older Posts