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Monday, March 12, 2018

Buddhism is not a religion of peace

As a student of Japanese history, I have always been totally mystified by the common American misconception that there is anything peaceful about Buddhism in general, or Buddhist monks in particular. I suspect it is simply the result of non-Christians in the West desperately casting about for something, anything, in which they can believe is superior to Christianity. Nevertheless, the media is belatedly beginning to notice that perhaps Buddhism is not quite as gentle as they have generally portrayed it to be.
Buddhism may be touted in the West as an inherently peaceful philosophy, but a surge in violent rhetoric from small but increasingly influential groups of hardline monks in parts of Asia is upending the religion's tolerant image.

Buddhist mobs in Sri Lanka last week led anti-Muslim riots that left at least three dead and more than 200 Muslim-owned establishments in ruins, just the latest bout of communal violence there stoked by Buddhist nationalists.

In Myanmar, ultra-nationalist monks led by firebrand preacher Wirathu have poured vitriol on the country's small Muslim population, cheering a military crackdown forcing nearly 700,000 Rohingya into Bangladesh.

And in neighbouring Thailand, a prominent monk found himself in hot water for calling on followers to burn down mosques.

What has prompted this surge in aggressive rhetoric from followers of a faith that is so often equated, rightly or wrongly, with non-violence?
What has prompted it is the resurgence of Islam, of course. Buddhists in Asia have considerably more, and considerably more recent experience with Islamic violence than Christians do, and so they are naturally less tolerant of Muslims in their midst. As for the peaceful nature of Buddhism, The Tale of Genji, written in the eighth century by Murasaki Shikibu, is rife with incidents of the much-feared Buddhist monks descending from their mountain monasteries to raid and pillage the villages below. And The Tale of the Heike, compiled some 400 years later, tells of a massive battle between the imperial army and an army of Buddhist warrior monks.

The Heike split their forty thousand horsemen into two parties and swooped down on the fortifications at the two roads, uttering mighty war whoops. The monks were all unmounted men with forged weapons, but the court’s warriors were horsemen with bows and arrows, and they galloped after the monks in all directions, hitting every one of them with fast and furious barrages of arrow's. The battle began with an arrow exchange during the hour of the hare and raged all day long. After nightfall, the positions on the two roads both went down in defeat.

One of the routed monks was Saka no Shiro Yokaku, a brave warrior who surpassed everyone in the seven great temples and fifteen great temples in swordsmanship, archery, and physical strength. He wore armor with black lacing over a corselet with green lacing, and his five-plated helmet was fitted over a metal cap. Holding in one hand a long, unlacquered spear, curved like cogon grass, and in the other a great sword with a lacquered hilt, he slashed his way out of the Tegai Gate at the Todaiji, surrounded by a dozen monks from his cloister. He held his ground for a time, scything horses’ legs and felling many opponents. But the waves of attacks from the court’s huge army cut down all his companions, leaving him alone with his back unprotected, and he fled toward the south, brave though he was.

Now the battle was being fought in the dark. “Make a fire!” Shigchira ordered, standing in front of the gate at the Hannyaji Temple. One of the Heike warriors was a man named Tomokata, a functionary from the Fukui estate in Harima Province. This Tomokata promptly set a commoner’s house on fire, using a torch made from a broken shield. There was a strong wind blowing, as was usual enough for the season—it was late in the twelfth month, the night of the twenty-eighth—and the gusts spread the fire from the initial location to many different buildings in the temple precincts.

The battles at the Narazaka and Hannya roads had claimed the life of every monk who had feared disgrace and prized honor; and the others who could walk had fled toward Yoshino and Totsukawa. Aged monks unable to walk, eminent scholar-monks, pages, women, and children had fled helter-skelter into the Kofukuji, and also into the Great Buddha Hall, where more than a thousand had sought refuge on the second floor, with the ladders removed to save them from the pursuing enemy.  When the raging flames bore down on them, they uttered shrieks that seemingly could not have been surpassed by the sinners in the flames of the Tapana, Paritapana, and Avici hells....

When the scribes made a careful record of those who had burned to death in the flames, the total amounted to more than three thousand five hundred people: more than seventeen hundred on the second floor of the Great Buddha Hall, more than eight hundred at the Kofukuji, more than five hundred in this temple building, more than three hundred in that. More than a thousand monks had been killed in battle. The victors hung a few heads in front of the gate at the Hannyaji and carried a few others back to the capital.

On the twenty-ninth, Shigehira returned to the capital, leaving Nara in ruins. Kiyomori greeted the outcome of the expedition with vindictive glee, but the empress, the two retired emperors, the regent, and everyone else lamented. “It might have been all right to get rid of the soldier-monks, but it was a terrible mistake to destroy the temples,” people said.

The original plan had been to parade the monks’ heads through the avenues, and to hang them on the trees in front of the jail, but the court refused to issue the necessary orders, appalled by the destruction of the Todaiji and the Kofu-kuji. The heads were discarded in gutters and ditches.

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78 Comments:

Blogger Steve March 12, 2018 2:53 PM  

Buddhist mobs in Sri Lanka last week led anti-Muslim riots that left at least three dead and more than 200 Muslim-owned establishments in ruins

Lol.

Blogger Lovekraft March 12, 2018 2:59 PM  

"Unfortunately, liberal Christianity still reigns in much of Western Europe, and it mirrors all of its secular liberal counterparts’ incoherence and rampant self-doubt."

http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2018/03/20895/

Blogger APL March 12, 2018 3:01 PM  

"Buddhist mobs in Sri Lanka last week led anti-Muslim riots that left at least three dead and more than 200 Muslim-owned establishments in ruins, just the latest bout of communal violence there stoked by Buddhist nationalists."

All through the '70 under Indira Ghandi there were frequent riots in India in which numerous people would be killed, it was always over some Buddist shrine that had been levelled and had a mosque built over by the Islamic conquerors of India.

As in Jerusalem, and Constantinople. Indeed, in the UK too, where churches have been converted to Islamic temples.

Blogger CM March 12, 2018 3:02 PM  

So even peaceful Buddhist monks are less suicidal than churchians?

Blogger Resident Moron™ March 12, 2018 3:07 PM  

"Buddhist mobs in Sri Lanka last week led anti-Muslim riots that left at least three dead and more than 200 Muslim-owned establishments in ruins."

In consequence, the Buddhists will have peace, while we will not.

Maybe peace is the policy that reduces conflict, not the pretense that invites it?

Blogger AnvilTiger March 12, 2018 3:12 PM  

The "no true Scotsman" fallacy applies. That said, in regard to a religion or a philosophy, it is valid, indeed required, to apply boundaries. One must be able to assert what is "in bounds" or "out of bounds" for a proponent of the religion or philosophy.

Blogger Damn Crackers March 12, 2018 3:32 PM  

How can any wannabe Buddhist fetishist not know about the Shaolin monks? Haven't they ever heard a Wu-Tang disc?

Blogger Ken Prescott March 12, 2018 3:33 PM  

By and large, Western Buddhists are the most pacifist religious subgroup I've encountered.

Even the ones in the military. They don't start bar fights, etc.

But when battle is necessary, they will fight, they will fight courageously, and they won't be satisfied with anything short of victory.

That said, remember that the plural form of "anecdote" is not "data."

Blogger Ominous Cowherd March 12, 2018 3:37 PM  

Where are the Christian monks who should be burning mosques and mohammaden businesses in the West?

Blogger Steve March 12, 2018 3:55 PM  

During the height of the Cold War in the 1970s, one of Thailand's most prominent right-wing monks -- Kittiwuttho -- famously told followers it was "no sin to kill communists".

Wtf I love Buddhism now?

Imagine if Christian leaders had a spine.

Blogger Brett baker March 12, 2018 4:03 PM  

I was told once Buddhists couldn't kill, but they could slash, stab, or shoot a piece of clothing that just happened to have a person wearing it.

Blogger Brett baker March 12, 2018 4:03 PM  

I was told once Buddhists couldn't kill, but they could slash, stab, or shoot a piece of clothing that just happened to have a person wearing it.

Blogger manfred arcane March 12, 2018 4:06 PM  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbOgXfMcLoQ

Buddhism ain't what Sam Harris told you it is.

Blogger Demonic Professor El March 12, 2018 4:16 PM  

I will never forget the time I went to a PC Room where a small group of Buddhist monks were playing the Asian equivalent of Call of Duty (I can't remember the name), smoking cigarettes, drinking coffee and tea, and laughing and swearing.

This was a couple weeks after Buddha's birthday.

Did I ever mention I like Buddhists?

I also like their solution to the pirating, slave-trafficking terror nests called "Muslim areas" - paved it over and turn mosques into temples, civic centers, and post offices.

Blogger Durandel March 12, 2018 4:28 PM  

Off Topic - Vox, Brian Niemeier, Declan Finn, and others are reporting review deletions by Amazon that seem targeted at Right Leaning authors. You might want to check your own numbers to see if it has happened to you:

http://www.brianniemeier.com/2018/03/amazon-review-purge.html

Blogger Thucydides March 12, 2018 4:28 PM  

Anyone who has any knowledge of the war between the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Elam and the Buddhist Sinhalese of Siri Lanka will know the warrior spirit is still very much alive. The LTTE fought a vicious civil war between 1983 and 2009, using many techniques eventually adopted by Al Qeda and ISIS and other international terrorist organizations (such as suicide bombing), and the Siri Lankan government had a difficult time responding.

Short summary, the Siri Lankan army eventually crushed the LTTE by using a naval blockade to cut their supply lines to India, then crushed the rebellion with tanks, artillery and fast air.

Blogger James Dixon March 12, 2018 4:35 PM  

> ...the media is belatedly beginning to notice that perhaps Buddhism is not quite as gentle as they have generally portrayed it to be.

What? They never watched "Kung Fu"?

Blogger jandolin March 12, 2018 4:49 PM  

There are many schools of Islamic thought. The US cannot claim to be innocent in the spread of the violent intolerant Saudi Wahabi strain of Islam, which is replacing more peaceful strains of Islam such as Sufi Islam. Saudi strain of Islam has gained influence in recent decades because of Saudi petrodollars and Saudi control of Mecca.

Blogger Daniel Paul Grech Pereira March 12, 2018 4:51 PM  

That's a fantastically gory tale. I love Asian history now.

Blogger Steve March 12, 2018 5:07 PM  

more peaceful strains of Islam such as Sufi Islam

This is like pining for a less aggressive strain of syphilis. It'll still kill you if left untreated.

Anonymous Anonymous March 12, 2018 5:15 PM  

Clearly you have never read the Islamic texts.

Clearly you are unfamiliar with the Prophet’s life and deeds.

Clearly you are historically ignorant.

Blogger Snidely Whiplash March 12, 2018 5:18 PM  

Johnny Philosopher wrote:Clearly you have never read the Islamic texts.
Clearly you are unfamiliar with the Prophet’s life and deeds.
Clearly you are historically ignorant.

Clearly you are an apologist for a death cult.

Blogger MB March 12, 2018 5:27 PM  

"Where are the Christian monks who should be burning mosques and mohammaden businesses in the West?"
In fact there were several such monastic orders: Hospitaller, Templar, Teutonic, Calatrava, to mention but a few. They were eviscerated by the Protestant Reformation, by secular princes jealous of their power, due to Enlightenment ideas, and sometimes because they had fulfilled their purpose and put themselves out of work.
Maybe it's time to bring these warrior monks back.

Blogger Aeoli Pera March 12, 2018 5:35 PM  

"""
“Okay, I can see how they’re infiltrating Christianity big time when you’ve got the Israeli flag and the Star of Remphan and all these other things being portrayed in Christian churches now.” You say, “Well, what about religions outside of Christianity, Islam, Judaism. How’s Judaism going to bring in the Buddhist and the Hindus. That seems a little far-fetched Pastor Anderson.” Oh, not at all. You apparently have never heard of the Jew-Boos. There’s a movement known as the Jew-Boos, Jew Buddhist. Now, sometimes they’re known as the Boo-Jews. Take your pick: Boo-Jew, Jew-Boo.

Listen to this. Did you know that Jews only make up 2% of the American population but that it is estimated that at least one-third of Western Buddhist in America are Jewish by birth? Aside from all the Asians that are … Obviously, Asians are coming from Buddhist countries and so forth, but amongst, translation, White people or Black people that are Buddhist, it says one-third of non-Asians that are Buddhist are Jews, even though they’re only 2% of the population. Is that a little odd that there’s just this huge percentage of them that are these Jew Boos?

Moreover, many of the leading Buddhist teachers in America come from Jewish families including Bernard Glassman, Sharon Salzberg, Joseph Goldstein, Jack Kornfield, Norman Fischer, Bhikkhu Bodhi, Natalie Goldberg, Thubten Chodron, Sylvia Boorstein, Allen Ginsberg, Lama Surya Das, just to name a few. Not only that, but more than one-fourth of the professors teaching Buddhism in American colleges and universities were born Jewish. Hold on. It seems to me that Jews are a major force in Buddhism. They have taken over Buddhism and hijacked Buddhism in a sense. Why? Because there’s going to be a uniting of even Judaism and Buddhism. It’s already happening.
"""

http://www.faithfulwordbaptist.org/transcript_master_plan.html

Blogger Pseudotsuga March 12, 2018 5:42 PM  

As the Church is to Churchian, so is Buddhism to Western Bhuddians, the cafeteria Buddhists who are progressives instead of actual Buddhists.

Blogger Snidely Whiplash March 12, 2018 6:05 PM  

Aeoli Pera wrote:You say, “Well, what about religions outside of Christianity, Islam, Judaism. How’s Judaism going to bring in the Buddhist and the Hindus.
check out your average IT shop. the place I'm working has 50% Hindus, and 30% Chinese of whatever spirituality (Chinese are not as aggressive about displaying their religion).

Blogger Crew March 12, 2018 6:08 PM  

Clearly you are unfamiliar with the Prophet’s life and deeds.

You mean you take those fairy tales seriously?

Anonymous Anonymous March 12, 2018 6:18 PM  

"Maybe it's time to bring these warrior monks back."

There is a prophecy that during the Apocalypse that just such a militant order will be created.

Blogger Nate73 March 12, 2018 6:18 PM  

How did the muslim Rohingya get into the country in the first place?

Blogger Ominous Cowherd March 12, 2018 6:22 PM  

MB wrote:Maybe it's time to bring these warrior monks back.

Indeed. I suspect that the first denomination which returns to our militant, crusader roots will grow mightily.

Blogger yoghi.llama March 12, 2018 6:29 PM  

Well … we never said we were.

I work with a Burmese chap who explained to me that the Burmese legal system still operates under English common law. I had no idea. Now don't get me wrong, I'm sure they do not apply and practice the English law in the English way and to the English standard, but still, it's interesting to me that they saw nothing in it which was incompatible with Buddhism (or nationalism). When the British left, they just didn't bother changing the letter of the law: common law was good enough.

This is totally different to the "Rohingya" (i.e. Bengali illegal immigrants) who of course want shari'a law and nothing less.

Anonymous Anonymous March 12, 2018 6:34 PM  

Raiding, raping, and pillaging?

Yes, I take those fairy tales seriously.

Blogger Snidely Whiplash March 12, 2018 6:46 PM  

Johnny Philosopher wrote:Yes, I take those fairy tales seriously.
The fact that you call the arch-heretic and hater of God "The Prophet" is all we need to know.

Blogger tuberman March 12, 2018 6:59 PM  

Islam is a imperialist political movement pretending to be a religion, and PDJT is completely aware of that fact.

Blogger Emmett Fitz-Hume March 12, 2018 7:08 PM  

In the 8th grade, we were doing a unit on Asia. Buddhism was, of course, covered in the unit.

My uncle gave me Shogun to read (Clavell) and I loved it. Blew my mind. But I went in to school to ask my teacher how the Amida Tong assassins of the book could also be pacifist Buddhists? This teacher had seen me reading Shogun and was very enthusiastic.

He (being an excellent teacher) had me research Buddhist violence.

I found enlightenment, so to speak.

Anonymous Anonymous March 12, 2018 7:10 PM  

Did you even read my comments in context or were you just dying to try out “Arch-heretic”?

Read more. Post less.

Blogger Lazarus March 12, 2018 7:12 PM  

Off Topic, but Vox HAS to be interested in this:


DNA tests can predict intelligence, scientists show for first time

Also featured at iSteveblog

Blogger Gloriam Deo March 12, 2018 7:16 PM  

@7 I hear they ain't nothin' to fuck with.

Blogger tuberman March 12, 2018 7:25 PM  

Ominous Cowherd wrote:Where are the Christian monks who should be burning mosques and mohammaden businesses in the West?

Held down and infiltrated by "the enemy within" obviously. It has taken centuries for such infiltration to happen in complete stealth mode, and may take 4-6 years to totally destroy them.

It reality, it will take longer, but do you even know who the enemy leaders are? Naw.

Blogger Andrea Daley March 12, 2018 7:40 PM  

Buddhism is a religion of peace to the extent that it doesn't preach violence. Same with Christianity.

But religious people were almost never purists in their faith.

So, Buddhists used violence like anyone else.

Still, Buddhism is not a messianic religion. It's not obsessed about converting souls, and so, there were no Buddhist crusades or Buddhist missionaries traveling around the world.

Buddhism is about the individual withdrawing from the world than about individuals proselytizing to the rest of the world

Blogger pyrrhus March 12, 2018 7:58 PM  

@5 Steve Sailer had a column a while back on why there is so little moslem violence in India...It seems that Hindus respond to moslem violence with "indiscriminate mass violence" against the whole moslem community....It's almost like that causes the community to clamp down on its more violent members, haha.

Blogger Skyler the Weird March 12, 2018 8:38 PM  

Or the Indians just fire some artillery at the Pakistani side of the border in Kashmir.

Blogger Dave March 12, 2018 9:11 PM  

Them monks were just upset they didn't have any of these:
http://forum.altherocomics.com/viewtopic.php?p=232&sid=1e31816d46b796c7bcd48eac82f56921#p232

Blogger tuberman March 12, 2018 10:28 PM  

41. pyrrhus

You're correct, but often it is said to be more specific, as the Hindus target the extended families of the Jihadists, killing the whole family groups as a lesson...this works pretty well.

Blogger Jack March 12, 2018 10:31 PM  

Not all Buddhists are pacifists, but Buddhism certainly has a pacifist streak. The story of Nalanda University is instructive. It was once the highest center of learning in India. It had a huge library, and people came from all over to study dharma. Then Muslims happened. They burnt the place to the ground. The monks at Nalanda had been raised not to fight, so they put up no defense. Buddhism started in India, but there are few Buddhists there today. Because if you don't fight the invaders, you die.

The Tibetans have been pretty good about not fighting non-Buddhists, but they sure do like to fight each other. There are four main sects of Buddhism in Tibet - Nyingma, Kagyu, Sakya, and Gelugpa - and they've had their share of violent conflicts.

I'm not surprised that Japanese history has the greatest number of examples of Buddhist violence, but I think it speaks more to the character of the Japanese than to anything about Buddhism. It's not their native religion, it's an import. Hippies in America turned Buddhism into flower power, and the Japanese turned it into samurai philosophy and a metaphysics of kamikaze attacks. D.T. Suzuki, who popularized Zen in the West, was also a fierce Japanese nationalist.

Buddhism ultimately lends itself to many different cultural forms because it's a "non-theistic" religion that refuses to ascribe any qualities to the ultimate reality, unlike Christianity which says that God is Goodness, and Truth, and Love. Buddhism just says "ineffable emptiness" which means that at the end of the day, a cruel regime has just as much Buddha nature as a just kingdom. They don't have a foundation for a moral philosophy because their conception of truth is "beyond good and evil," like Nietzsche. Whenever you see that phrase "beyond good and evil," run.

Blogger Azure Amaranthine March 12, 2018 10:43 PM  

"Did you even read my comments in context or were you just dying to try out “Arch-heretic”?

Read more. Post less."


What miserly context you provided was not tied as a response to any particular comment, so it was interpreted as being about the most recent one. No amount of reading can produce information that has not been written. Your second comment was insufficient to clear that up.

Stop acting like a little bitch and learn to communicate better instead of blaming others for your failings.

"Buddhism is a religion of peace to the extent that it doesn't preach violence. Same with Christianity."

Calling you a loudmouth ignoramus is by far the most generous interpretation of your self-exposure.

Blogger Nick March 12, 2018 10:45 PM  

After visiting China and even Tibet, my naive impression of Buddhism was changed. Mostly this occurred in Tibet where Monks would routinely bypass, ignore or even step over the poor and infirm. While in Lhasa, we encountered a paraplegic pulling himself around on a board with wheels. He had no shirt, was very dirty and obviously had mental problems. As a young Christian, I was confused why the Monks ignored him as he reached out and spoke to them. Nothing. I decided to take out some money - a mistake I learned the hard way - and gave it to him. All of a sudden children far and wide were shoved towards me by their mothers. I couldn't move. Some small children were wrapped around my legs. All the others had their hands out screeching and wailing at me in a foreign language. I felt trapped and ended up dropping a fist full of cash on the ground and quickly moved myself into the hotel.

Later I asked our Tibetan guide, a self proclaimed atheist, why these Monks ignore the needy and why these people live in fear? She told me "Nobody wants to come back as a Hungry Ghost or snake or a spider" and so it made sense to see 60 year old women in prostration on the concrete, up and downot with skin burns, to gain merit. But also she told me " but sometimes people come back with sickness and dysfunction and poor". She told me " That's because in another lif they were not good". So, the obvious conclusion was these people, needing mercy and help,were actually getting whatb they deserved and that explained why they were so ignored.

Blogger Azure Amaranthine March 12, 2018 10:46 PM  

Hmmn, may need to cut down on the caffeine intake.

Blogger WS4E March 12, 2018 11:13 PM  

This comment has been removed by the author.

Blogger IreneAthena March 12, 2018 11:16 PM  

Protestants and Catholics were killing one another for a century or three. The early Protestant Dunkards considered that with Constantine, pure Christianity had transmogrified into a death cult, an empire expanding by worldly force rather than spiritual conversions. And conversely, Irish Catholics massacred at Cromwell’s hand could’ve rightly viewed old Oliver’s movement as a death cult from its cradle days.

What needed to change so that Catholics and Protestants post WW2 now are at peace? (The recent Eastern/Orthodox/Ukraine/Russia conflict is an exception, I guess.) Wasn’t that spiritual re-alignment among Christian denominations the same kind of change (i.e. a move away from religion as a worldly empire building enterprise) that led the Sufi to a form of Islam which makes his primary goal a spiritual connection to God and his fellowman?

Blogger IreneAthena March 12, 2018 11:19 PM  

More of you are familiar with the truth of what Jandolin says than are speaking up here: US foreign policy has directly supported the rise of violent Saudi Wahhabism for decades.

Blogger Snidely Whiplash March 12, 2018 11:23 PM  

Read more. Post less.
Screw you, punk. You get to make baseless assertions of superior education and awareness, I get to call you out for the moronic pissant you are.

Blogger Gloriam Deo March 12, 2018 11:43 PM  

@52 having read all the comments, I am pretty sure he isn't praising islam. I may have missed something, but I think he is saying that Mohammad (pig feces be upon him) was a murderous, rapist.

in fact, when i pull the comments up on my phone, his comment is indented underneath number 18, which is some idiot defending islam with the "some people have a bad version of islam" thing.

he is replying to someone actually defending islam, not defending it himself.

reread his comment as a reply to 18 (or pull it up on mobile)and then reread your thread with him. i think you will be surprised at the difference.

Blogger Gloriam Deo March 12, 2018 11:46 PM  

@46 reread his original comment on mobile. it shows as a reply to a defender of islam there. mobile does not mark replies for desktop for some reason

Blogger Rambam March 13, 2018 12:11 AM  

Be wary of monks grasshopper.

Blogger flyingtiger March 13, 2018 1:06 AM  

Zen Buddhism was popular with the Japanese militarist before WW II. So when someone says that the Buddhists are peaceful, I tell them that everyone who planned Pearl Harbor was a Zen Buddhist. That usually shuts them up.
As for the Sufi's. The Checkians are mostly Sufi's.
All Moslem support the Jihad. Some are more active then others.

Blogger Antony March 13, 2018 1:46 AM  

OT - but I know the bods here are interested in both military strategy and the machinations of "Gods Chosen People", so I bring to you're attention a new book on Mossad by Dr Ronan Bergman ; " Rise & Kill First - the secret history of Israel's targeted assassinations" - interview with Stratfor ; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Op_6pS7W8Bk&feature=em-uploademail

Blogger IreneAthena March 13, 2018 2:19 AM  

Putin has been a supporter of the movement to restore traditional Sufi Islam by Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov, as a way to resist Wahabbi-influenced radical Islamist extremists in Chechnya. To Sufis like Kadyrov, jihad is a nationalist resistance to invasion of ones homeland, and the first Chechen war against Russia was that nationalistic kind of jihad. But in the second Chechen war, the Wahhabist radicals infiltrated the Sufi ranks, and turned the jihad into the extremist “take the whole world by force for Allah” kind of Jihad. Well, Ramzan Kadyrov’s Sufi father would have none of that evil Wahhabism, and actually switched sides to fight WITH Russia against the Wahabbi extremists. Hence Putin’s support of the Sufi Kadyrov family and their anti-wahhabist, anti-Islam-extremist movement.

Flyingtiger, I am actually glad you brought up Chechnya, because what happened in the second Chechen war with Russia, with radical Wahhabist islamists infiltrating a local nationalist jihad has been a pattern in every place that the US has invaded a Muslim country: the quite justifiable nationalistic jihad in response by the locals is an opportunity for the Worldwide jihad of the wahabbist radicals to gain a footing.

Blogger Meng Greenleaf March 13, 2018 3:00 AM  

I don't know why, but this blog post reminded me of the Japanese Buddhist priest Nichiren. His form of Buddhism led to a version of the "One True" meme. Ultimately, I believe, his followers were crushed by another Buddhist sect of militant monks.

Anyway, I'm not convinced Graeco-Buddhism is at odds with Christianity. Though I personally find little to be redeeming in Islam, the more I read about Muslim ghettos in the USA and Europe, the more I appreciate the rational for making it up. It really is about asserting massive impulse control over a (relatively dimwitted) population of humans. At least so it seems to me.

Blogger Meng Greenleaf March 13, 2018 3:14 AM  

I don't know if I mentioned this or not, but when in Japan I live in a Buddhist Temple. It's a relatively small temple in Japanese suburbia. Anyway, it seems I have, but nonetheless: One day while standing next o my father-in-law in the main part of the temple, near the Buddha. I was reading/leafing through an ancient book of drawing where I came upon pictures of hell. I lot of sinners being raped by demons in Buddhist hell. I was somewhat shocked that children read these books. At least children of the temple. These were full on drawings of forced intercourse with creatures. Nightmarish. I turned to my father-in-law, the Temple Priest, and said (snarkly), "You know, I don't believe any of this. I mean, none of it. Nothing". He replied, "You're probably right". That was one of the few times I felt gobsmacked. I also felt somewhat ashamed for being so rude. I mean, I'm paraphrasing but that pretty much sums up the jist.

Japanese Buddhism isn't so different from other beliefs. It has it hells. It has it's heavens. Its wars. Its high culture and beautiful architecture. Maybe its me, but I feel like a thousand, thousand generations lived and died in endless seasons, crushed again and again in the harsh grip of winter. Maybe cannot thrive without that harsh winter's grip? I think it's hard to appreciate our religions, without reflecting on life with four seasons. I also think it's something we share between the West, and the East. We're alike in many ways, more so than the others.

Blogger MycroftJones March 13, 2018 3:22 AM  

Looks like an earlier comment was eaten by the comment system. Even today, you can watch the local news in Korea and regularly see buddist monks in violent fights with the police. Tear gas, grenades, full riot gear, the works.

Blogger Sherwood family March 13, 2018 3:27 AM  

Andrea Daley: one correction: there have been plenty of Buddhist missionaries over centuries spreading the faith, especially across Asia. To believe otherwise is to be ignorant of Buddhism.

Blogger Jack Amok March 13, 2018 3:50 AM  

Did you even read my comments in context or were you just dying to try out “Arch-heretic

What you wrote got exactly the response it deserved. Perhaps you thought there was context that didn't exist. I'd suggest requesting a Mulligan and starting over with more clarity this time.

Common problem when commenting. No big deal, just don't double down.

Blogger Thad tuiol March 13, 2018 3:50 AM  

This comment has been removed by the author.

Blogger Thad tuiol March 13, 2018 3:52 AM  

Buddhist monks actively aided, abetted, and sometimes even carried out attacks against ARVN/US forces and South Vietnamese civilians under the direction of the NVA/Vietcong in the Vietnam war. Whatever the rights and wrongs of that war and America's part in it, I have never, ever, been under the stupid liberal western delusion that Buddhism equals Peace.

Blogger bob kek mando - ( I love the smell of Autism on the internet. It smells like ... victoREEEEEEEEE ) March 13, 2018 3:59 AM  

9. Ominous Cowherd March 12, 2018 3:37 PM
Where are the Christian monks who should be burning mosques and mohammaden businesses in the West?



i can't answer for the monks, but the position of Pope Pound-Me-In-The-France-Ass is that the prayers of Musselmen are as efficacious as those of any Christian.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6FfTxwTX34

the historical response of the Roman and Orthodox Churches to Jihad is Crusade.

the response of this 'Pope' to the modern Jihad ( which numerous Imams have declared is their explicit goal ) is to give aid and comfort to Islam.

draw your own conclusions.


Anonymous Anonymous March 13, 2018 4:54 AM  

@56 - "All Moslem support the Jihad. Some are more active then others. "

For exactly the same reason that all christians support evangelising the world, even those that don't do much about it. It's a central plank of the religion.

If one is a christian, you face the simple question: "Ok, so I'm a Christian. What does God want me to do with my life, exactly?" The answer is: "Go into all the world, preach the gospel, make disciples of all men".

For a Muslim, the answer is "Jihad".

Blogger Paul Sacramento March 13, 2018 7:25 AM  

Warrior monks are a staple of pretty much every religion.
One is hard pressed to look back at history of the orient and Asia and to get from that, the view that Buddhist are peaceful. Of course that would actually require one to study or at least read history.
For westerners that actively look at non-christian religions as "better" or more "evolved", the tenets of Buddhism ON THE SURFACE seem to promote peace.
Yet, as any clinical psychologist will tell you, religions that end towards nihilism ( as Buddhism does), can lead people down a very slippery path.

Blogger MJimmy March 13, 2018 7:32 AM  

"You can be full of kindness and love, but you cannot sleep next to a mad dog,”

“I call them troublemakers, because they are troublemakers”

-- Ashin Wirathu

Islam delenda est

Blogger Duke Norfolk March 13, 2018 9:13 AM  

MB wrote:Maybe it's time to bring these warrior monks back.

Indeed. Let's hear it for The Heretics of St. Possenti!

If you haven't read the book, do so.

Blogger Ominous Cowherd March 13, 2018 10:12 AM  

bob kek mando - ( I love the smell of Autism on the internet. It smells like ... victoREEEEEEEEE ) wrote:

i can't answer for the monks, but the position of Pope Pound-Me-In-The-France-Ass is that the prayers of Musselmen are as efficacious as those of any Christian.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6FfTxwTX34

the historical response of the Roman and Orthodox Churches to Jihad is Crusade.

the response of this 'Pope' to the modern Jihad ( which numerous Imams have declared is their explicit goal ) is to give aid and comfort to Islam.

draw your own conclusions.



There are other denominations besides the Romans, and other groups besides Roman monastics. Christendom has grown strangely suicidal. Time we started turning that around.

Blogger Were-Puppy March 13, 2018 10:25 AM  

@57 Antony

interview with Stratfor ;
---

Going OT with you briefly, I recently discovered this on wikileaks - The Stratfor Glossary of Useful Baffling and Strange Intelligence Terms

https://wikileaks.org/IMG/pdf/The_Stratfor_Glossary_of_Useful_Baffling_and_Strange_Intelligence_Terms.pdf

Blogger Anthony March 13, 2018 10:53 AM  

Tibetan Buddhism is far from peaceful. The current Dalai Lama's pacifism is a tactic because making war on China could lead to a genocide of the Tibetans.

The ninth through twelfth Dalai Lamas were poisoned before reaching 19 years of age. The ones before were heavily involved in political intrigues and wars.

The 13th Dalai Lama led revolts and invaded China. The 14th (current) one worked with the CIA, and participated in the 1959 uprising.

These are not non-violent folks, except when they know violence will get them killed.

Blogger Anthony March 13, 2018 10:57 AM  

In "The Bloody White Baron", the author says that Western Buddhism is for people who would become Episcopalians, but don't like the harsh dogma. He also compares the relations between the Tibetans Lamas and the Mongol Khans to the relations between the Popes and the Holy Roman Emperors.

(It's a fascinating book, about how a German-descended Russian nobleman became, for a short time, the rules of Mongolia.)

Blogger Solaire Of Astora March 13, 2018 12:09 PM  

Might be too late to get an answer but what translation of Genji did VD read if anyone knows? I read the Royall Tyler translation and I don't remember them fearing Buddhist monks attacking them but bandits without any specific affiliations. I wonder if it was sanitized in the translation I read or if I missed something. I Googled this before because I wanted to go more in depth on the material but there is a dearth of discussions on the Tale of Genji in english.

Blogger Technomad March 14, 2018 3:15 AM  

As late as the beginnings of the Tokugawa shogunate, in the early 1600s, warrior monks were a force to be reckoned with. Kennyo Kosa, the abbot of one monastery, held off Oda Nobunaga in a ten-year siege of his monastery...and Oda Nobunaga is generally referred to as the "Demon King." Anybody who could fight him to a standstill is no pacifist.

Blogger Daniel March 14, 2018 6:37 AM  

Yet the unholy alliance between usa and sa put steroids on the muzzies.

Blogger Daniel March 14, 2018 6:43 AM  

Lol the pedo life he led is well documented by his own followers and until not so long displayed with pride in the west

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