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Friday, March 09, 2018

Corception

Last night at the Voxiversity Q&A event, the discussion about a prospective Voxiversity on rhetoric and dialect revealed the need for a word to express the concept of something that is technically false but rhetorically true that tends to guide one towards the truth.

If you think about it, we use the term deception to indicate the opposite, when one expresses that which is technically true, but leads others into a false understanding. And to the extent we express the concept at all, we would probably resort to the oxymoronic and awkward construction "deceived into the truth."

My first thought was to describe the concept as inceit, but the problem is that "inception" already has a fairly well-understood and unrelated meaning due to the popular movie. So, I landed upon the construction corceit, as it fits rather nicely with the etymology of the term "correct".

1300-50; (v.) Middle English correcten (< Anglo-French correcter) < Latin corrēctus past participle of corrigere to make straight, equivalent to cor- cor- + reg- (stem of regere to direct ) + -tus past participle suffix; (adj.) (< French correct) < Latin, as above

The reason the term is needed is because none of the similar terms accurately describe the concept.
A correct statement is one free from error, mistakes, or faults. An accurate statement is one that shows careful conformity to fact, truth, or spirit. A precise statement shows scrupulously strict and detailed conformity to fact.
None of that is true in the case of what can be described as a corceptive statement or story, such as the parables told by Jesus Christ. That pointed to another possible approach to the concept with a term such as parabole, (which, interestingly enough, is a little closer to the concept in French than "parable" is in English) but again, "parabolic" has already been utilized for "having the form or outline of a parabola."

Now, I am aware that many, if not most of you will completely fail to appreciate the point of this sort of thought exercise, but that's fine. I happen to find it very useful to be able to identify and articulate specific concepts like this, even if it is only for my internal use. It helps me clarify my thoughts when I am contemplating questions like the morality of corceptive rhetoric vs deceptive dialectic. If it happens to be useful to anyone else, so much the better, but rest assured, I don't expect anyone else to utilize my idiosyncratic constructions.

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86 Comments:

Blogger Avalanche March 09, 2018 4:26 AM  

Good morning Dark Lord,

Would you provide an example of a phrase, statement, or concept that would be "technically false but rhetorically true that tends to guide one towards the truth." I was not sure last night how that would be formed. Thanks.

Blogger Looking Glass March 09, 2018 4:29 AM  

Proper terminology is always important. If you cannot describe something properly, it is extremely hard to convey the information to someone else.

A good portion of hyperbolic statements would fall under this, but the main ones that come to mind is idioms. It may be "raining cats & dogs", but there are no cats nor dogs falling from the sky at the moment. Yet it's a statement that conveys specific meaning and information.

It would also apply to times of "direction by misdirection", and it relates to the Streisand Effect, as well. Actually, the Streisand Effect would be the category of corception that is unintended and/or incurs the opposite reaction from which you intended.

Blogger Avalanche March 09, 2018 4:39 AM  

But isn't the opposite reaction different from false pointing toward true?

Blogger SciVo March 09, 2018 4:41 AM  

Sure, the problem with a very precise neologism is that it might not catch on, if few others wish to make the same fine distinction. But at least for me, "corception" will be easier to remember than your science ones and also more useful in the day-to-day, since it applies to even something as simple as "SJWs always lie."

Blogger Avalanche March 09, 2018 4:42 AM  

(Funny, you never think of 'raining cats and dogs' as being false. It's an exaggerated metaphor -- but it's also false!

Blogger VD March 09, 2018 4:43 AM  

Would you provide an example of a phrase, statement, or concept that would be "technically false but rhetorically true that tends to guide one towards the truth." I was not sure last night how that would be formed. Thanks.

SJWs always lie. My critics like to point to this as evidence of my own dishonesty. But, of course, the very rhetorical effectiveness of it points one toward the truth of the essential, habitual, and intentional dishonesty of the social justice warriors.

An excellent example from last night was the parables of Jesus. Was there actually a man traveling on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho who was set upon and beaten by robbers? What was the name of the Levite who passed him by? At what inn did the Samaritan leave him and did the Samaritan actually pay two denarii?

If not, must we then conclude that Jesus was a liar and a sinner?

Blogger Kristophr March 09, 2018 4:45 AM  

Hmmm.

This looks like the difference between General Semantics and Neuro-linguistic Programming.

General Semantics seeks to quell false to fact ideation and neural disturbances by rigorous application of language and thought.

NLP seeks to reach good ends ( at least good to the NLP practitioner ) via deliberately confusing vagaries of language and thought.

Blogger VD March 09, 2018 4:46 AM  

Sure, the problem with a very precise neologism is that it might not catch on, if few others wish to make the same fine distinction.

But that's not a problem at all. It's neither here nor there. I don't expect people to make the same fine distinctions that I do. I don't expect most of them to even spare a single thought for such matters. I spend absolutely no time thinking about Paris Hilton, or Kim Kardashian, or whoever the media's whore du jour might be now. Likewise, I don't expect the average individual to think about the morality of rhetoric or scenario setups for Advanced Squad Leader.

Blogger SciVo March 09, 2018 4:50 AM  

@2 Looking Glass: I think you're making that way too complicated. We already have a term for metaphors, and the Streisand Effect is not even related.

Blogger Looking Glass March 09, 2018 5:07 AM  

@9 SciVo

Vox is laying out a technical term, and I was thus poking around the extent to which it applies to various other concepts. It cuts across various other concepts, simply because it has a specific categorization, so there ones that'll more regularly fit the new categorization.

As for the Streisand Effect, I was thinking of when someone lies to avoid calling attention to something, but the lie itself draws attention to the issue. That technically is not the Streisand Effect, so I stand corrected.

Blogger AdognamedOp March 09, 2018 5:07 AM  

Yeah, Iam wading in the shallow end with those inflatable arm float thingies stuck to my arms so I don't drown.

Blogger Azure Amaranthine March 09, 2018 5:09 AM  

Any Christian fictionist should be entirely familiar with the concept.

Blogger Azure Amaranthine March 09, 2018 5:14 AM  

Benefict/benefiction enters my mind.

Blogger Samuel Nock March 09, 2018 5:23 AM  

Concepts and phenomena exist whether we name them or not.* But they are much more difficult to notice or to use if they have no name. Many people will start noticing this phenomenon ("false" statements that point to a truth) now that Vox has named it.

*And this is not at all to knock the creativity and perspicacity involved in identifying and naming things that pass most people by. It is an valuable skill.

Blogger artensoll March 09, 2018 5:27 AM  

I was unable to attend the q&a as I'm on UK time. Will a transcript be made available?

Blogger Iskander Magnus March 09, 2018 5:37 AM  

Metamythic? Or alethomythic?

Blogger VD March 09, 2018 5:41 AM  

I was unable to attend the q&a as I'm on UK time. Will a transcript be made available?

Sorry, we don't do transcripts of these.

Blogger rumpole5 March 09, 2018 5:58 AM  

Was it you, our Dark Lord who said that it is very difficult, almost impossible for two individuals to communicate effectively if they are separated by more than two standard deviations in IQ? I suspect that this is not going to be a 200+ comment post!

Blogger TheWesman Colvin March 09, 2018 6:07 AM  

Cool, Thank you for the new word. I'll use it.

Blogger Aeoli March 09, 2018 6:07 AM  

Is this the same as an altruistic lie?
https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/lying-definition/

Blogger VD March 09, 2018 6:08 AM  

Is this the same as an altruistic lie?

No. Altruism might dictate pointing the other party to falsehood. Also, it doesn't deal with motivation at all, but with effect.

Blogger Rick March 09, 2018 6:14 AM  

A thing about Jesus. Always absolute precision in the selection of words. But of course he would.
And...they were often selected to provoke, disturb, and knock you off balance.
It’s only later that you discover that they were absolutely true in essence (which is why the details say of a parable (names, dates) don’t matter— if essesne = true, then it is ALWAYS true) and what he said actually should not have been unsettling at all. Because the problem was in the hearer which needed to be corrected. And out of mercy, corrected as soon as possible.
An example “get behind me, Satan!” said to Peter of all people.

Blogger Lovekraft March 09, 2018 6:15 AM  

Massaging the Truth

MassTruth

Backrub

Blogger Rocklea Marina March 09, 2018 6:17 AM  

The Supreme Dark Lord and The Evil Legion of Evil, Red Pilled Corceptions and Destroyers of SJW Deceptions.

Blogger yoghi.llama March 09, 2018 6:19 AM  

https://infogalactic.com/info/Figure_of_speech

Parrhetic adynaton?

Altruistic catachresis?

Dysphemic syncatabasis?

Blogger The Kurgan March 09, 2018 6:20 AM  

Likewise, I don't expect the average individual to think about the morality of rhetoric or scenario setups for Advanced Squad Leader.

Or Traveller adventures that include realistic gravity assist trajectories for that matter.

It’s a fallen, fallen, fallen world!

Blogger Uncle John's Band March 09, 2018 6:23 AM  

This sort of exercise is valuable. The world doesn't fall into categories and abstractions like language; they're tools to process information and communicate, and can be more or less fit for purpose. A lot of toxic, faux-intellectual b.s. goes on in the gap between experience and representation - all the civilization-destroying runoff from Postmodernism, for example - and the more precise we can be in our agreed-on terms, the less room for sophistry.

Corception works because it labels something that we can recognize by description, but has no name of its own. Morally it refines the question of whether the "ends justify the means" by examining the desired ends. Anything that shifts the focus to the relationship between communication and truth is positive.

Blogger Aeoli March 09, 2018 6:27 AM  

No. Altruism might dictate pointing the other party to falsehood. Also, it doesn't deal with motivation at all, but with effect.

Okay.

Any Christian fictionist should be entirely familiar with the concept.

That's a good point, there's probably a 6,000-word post somewhere on John C Wright's blog about what the Greeks and scholastic monks said about this.

Blogger Aeoli March 09, 2018 6:34 AM  

Part of me thinks "comedy" works here, in the older, more dramatic sense as in "divine comedy".

Blogger Aeoli March 09, 2018 6:37 AM  

Best I've found on scifiwright so far is "fundamental truths" http://www.scifiwright.com/2014/03/writing-down-the-dragon/

Blogger Felix Bellator March 09, 2018 6:51 AM  

Heh, the things some people think about. A while back I was trying to think of a term similar to "delegate," to pass a task downward or laterally, but to pass a task upward. I concluded "elevate" was the correct word.

I am still looking for a word that means the opposite of surprise. Like, "SJWs always lie. Anti-surprise!" Please help....

Blogger Wuzzums Fuzzums March 09, 2018 7:18 AM  

The classical usage of the word "propaganda" also applies I think. Any method including lies, truth, logic, sophistry, science, etc which effectively lead one to a desired conclusion is deemed propaganda.
The distinction between truth-oriented or deceit-oriented propaganda has to be made.

Blogger Jack Burroughs March 09, 2018 7:30 AM  

"the discussion about a prospective Voxiversity on rhetoric and dialect revealed the need for a word to express the concept of something that is technically false but rhetorically true that tends to guide one towards the truth."

There IS a need for such a term. That's a real insight, Vox. At the same time, it's remarkable that such a term doesn't already exist. And that is a strong indication that your coinage actually could gain wider traction. It's needed.

However, I'm not quite sure that Jesus's parables should be classed together with "SJWs always lie" under the same technical term. Are they really doing the same thing?

The parables are pedagogical fictions; nobody listening to them takes them to be literally true stories.

But "SJWs always lie" is a bit more ambiguous, because it is polemical rhetoric. To most readers, you obviously are not really making such an absolute claim. But some readers might sincerely take you literally in a way that practically no one takes Jesus literally.

I guess you could say that these are just corceptively different rhetorical techniques. Maybe they are.

If so, then there is another corceptive technique to consider: Picasso's view that "art is the lie that reveals the truth."

The most radical corception would actually be a kind of pedagogical *deception*--as, for instance, the documentary filmmaker who aggressively stylizes the presentation of his subject (lying about it, basically) in order to reveal a deeper kind of truth.

Documentary film as soul-portraiture is a highly (and perhaps dangerously) corceptive art form.





Blogger Stilicho March 09, 2018 7:32 AM  

Agree as to usefulness. First examples that came to mind were parables and Aesop's fables: not factually accurate but designed to lead the audience to truth.

Leftists made a run at the concept with "truthiness" but as their goal was to ultimately lead the audience to belief in falsehood, their effort became a byword for lies with pretensions to truth.

Blogger VD March 09, 2018 7:40 AM  

However, I'm not quite sure that Jesus's parables should be classed together with "SJWs always lie" under the same technical term. Are they really doing the same thing?

Yes, literally and technically. Both are (presumably) readily disproven by strict dialectic. Again, it's not about whether the audience takes it literally or not, it's about the strict factual basis of the content.

The parables are pedagogical fictions; nobody listening to them takes them to be literally true stories.

That is not relevant in this context. Nor is it credible to claim that no one listening to them, or reading them later, takes them to be literally true, because you cannot possibly know that.

Blogger Forge the Sky March 09, 2018 7:46 AM  

I’ve heard ‘directionally true’ used in a few places. It maybe lacks the precision of the neologism, but it’s a bit more intuitive in conversation.

Blogger Jack Burroughs March 09, 2018 7:54 AM  

" Nor is it credible to claim that no one listening to them, or reading them later, takes them to be literally true, because you cannot possibly know that."

Fair enough. There's always someone who gonna take you literally. I was myself using an "SJWs always lie" kind of corception there.

But if it's only about the strict factual basis of the content, rather than audience perception, then you're right that the distinction I was making is irrelevant.

It's a good coinage. I'll use it.


Blogger Peaceful Poster March 09, 2018 8:01 AM  

"SJW's Always Lie" is an immaculate corception.

Blogger SDaly March 09, 2018 8:41 AM  

The left's version of this is the rhetorical claim that the forged documents about George Bush and the Texas National Guard were "fake, but accurate."

Blogger SDaly March 09, 2018 8:46 AM  

Also, the term "corception" made me think of Clarkhat's term "cordycepted" which has been defined as:

"the tendency of a certain fungus [a cordycep] to make ants into zombies, doing its will, much as the viral meme of egalitarianism does to human brains, entering them through areas of low self-confidence"

Blogger dienw March 09, 2018 8:47 AM  

An example of why one must be careful of using "corception" is that some would apply it to "computer models" as in "A scientific corception would be a computer model showing global warmin..no, global coo.. no..ah fu*ck, climate change."

Blogger Sweep the Leg March 09, 2018 8:51 AM  

How would this be different from sarcasm or irony?

In sarcasm, a false, exagerated claim or expression is made to give the opposite impression.

Blogger Avalanche March 09, 2018 8:54 AM  

@35 Barbie says, "rhetoric is haaaard!"

(But worth the effort!)

Blogger CM March 09, 2018 9:02 AM  

I thought Aristotle's definition of rhetoric covered this in that rhetoric should point to the truth, even if the statement is specifically false.

Which would mean what I understand you are trying to define is covered by "rhetoric" while specific truths used to deceive fall outside rhetoric and dialectic.

Blogger EIA March 09, 2018 9:08 AM  

@Feilx Bellator: The common term used in business is "escalate", as in "We need to escalate that issue to higher management."

Blogger tuberman March 09, 2018 9:11 AM  

Many knew already what is a positive rhetoric use, but it helps to nail it down with this distinctive word. I seen several people conflate positive rhetoric with lies, as if it is the same as lies that damage and distort.

Corception is a good single term that might get some nigglers to understand the nature of "good" rhetoric.

Blogger tuberman March 09, 2018 9:18 AM  

Great memes are a branch of a corception devices.

Blogger tz March 09, 2018 9:22 AM  

Basically it prevents the rhetorical to dialectical shell game.

"Blacks vote for Democrats"

(but it's only 90%, and I know of one, NAXALT!).

When we have a discussion, and need to address Swans, we need to assume white swans, not black swans, much less blue ones.

A statement that is in daily practice, true even if it would fail as a scientific hypothesis.

Newton's laws of motion are perhaps good example since they work as long as you aren't on a quantum scale or going near the speed of light. Are Physics teachers to be interrupted every few minutes while teaching these with all the exceptions?

Blogger jimmy_the_freak March 09, 2018 9:39 AM  

You could call it a Rather: fake but accurate.

Blogger Chesapean March 09, 2018 9:40 AM  

DEceit and CONceit are opposites, although we have little cultural awareness these days that conceits can be beneficial.

Blogger Chesapean March 09, 2018 9:48 AM  

A beneficial conceit, for example, would be learning the word for a thing before having an actual experience of it. "Love" before loving.

Blogger VD March 09, 2018 10:02 AM  

I thought Aristotle's definition of rhetoric covered this in that rhetoric should point to the truth, even if the statement is specifically false.

That's wrong. The more rhetoric points to the truth, the more effective it is. But rhetoric that points to falsehood is still rhetoric.

Blogger James March 09, 2018 10:10 AM  

Corception. I like it. I believe I am in idiosynchronicity with you. Since we're making up words, I mean. Seems like words are like laws and sausage - it's not a pretty sight to see them get made.

Blogger kevmalone March 09, 2018 10:21 AM  

Very useful to have a single word for this concept.
In the past I've used theatrical terms to refer to this kind of thing (truth hiding behind falsehood), but that never felt completely correct.
Whether the actual neologism is memorable enough remains to be seen.
Let's run it up the flagpole and see who salutes.

Blogger Jabari March 09, 2018 10:26 AM  

Hmm, word is a bit close to "cordycepted", which Clarkhat and friends rather liked to use.

Blogger Orthodox March 09, 2018 10:29 AM  

I have heard the argument about fiction being lies in an ethics seminar. It was made by an autistic person and he debated with the professor for awhile. The reaction from the class was laughter and eye rolling.

Blogger Azure Amaranthine March 09, 2018 10:32 AM  

"I am still looking for a word that means the opposite of surprise."

Military types would use "Expected"(potentially "Expected match received.") or "Checks"(short for "Checks with chart.").

Blogger Azure Amaranthine March 09, 2018 10:39 AM  

"I have heard the argument about fiction being lies in an ethics seminar."

It's quite true. Fiction says things that never happened, aren't happening, or (in all likelihood) never will happen. By definition the first-order information conveyed is purely lies.

The unspoken is that, the content being largely lies, the only possible uses for it are to entertain or to convey concepts on the second-order or higher. Ideally, it does both, and the concepts it conveys are upright.

Blogger Azure Amaranthine March 09, 2018 10:42 AM  

Also, people should watch carefully what entertainment they consume. "Pure entertainment" with no conceptual values is an impossibility due to context, at the very least.

Blogger Rick March 09, 2018 10:43 AM  

VD - there are rumors that the GE has already meet with the fat dictator (according to Q). This is 4D beautiful if true ... as some in the MSM are claiming nothing will come of it.
It would be beautiful because this is just another way in which the MSM fails to understand how the GE operates. Doesn't it sound JUST LIKE something the GE would do? (Claiming it's GOING TO BE great. When it's ALREADY great.)

And...if true...isn't this the kind of rhetoric you are talking about? GE's not lying if he already met with fatty. With the added bonus that it really turns the screw in the MSM at least 4 times:

1) they never saw this coming
2) if he had said he could do it, they'd say he couldn't possibly do it
3) they should know him by now, of all people (professional political investigative journalists)
4) it has already happened hahaha

#4Dchess

Blogger Rick March 09, 2018 10:45 AM  

Correction: professional political investigative journalist remoras

Blogger heyjames4 March 09, 2018 11:08 AM  

Months ago discussion's about The Donald's more bombastic statements were that the press took him literally but not seriously (sperging), and the loyalists and foreigners took him seriously but not literally.

If I understand correctly, when a speaker phrases their words such that the audience is meant to take them seriously but not literally, then the speaker is performing corception. That covers SJW always lie, parables, and @therealdonaldtrump

Blogger Peaceful Poster March 09, 2018 11:28 AM  

The God Corcepter.

Blogger yoghi.llama March 09, 2018 11:32 AM  

Noble lie?

Pious fiction?

"Foma"?

https://infogalactic.com/info/Bokononism

Blogger Were-Puppy March 09, 2018 11:35 AM  

@47 tuberman
Great memes are a branch of a corception devices.
---

Yeah and I get yelled at often by Conspergatives over memes.

For instance, i put a meme of Maxine Waters in front of a glorious mansion indicating she doesn't live where her constituents live.

Offended spergs start yelling at me that I am a liar because that isn't her house. Her house is a slightly less glorious mansion in another location.

Who cares? The point is missed by such people.

Blogger Were-Puppy March 09, 2018 11:41 AM  

Corception chaps cucks hides.

Blogger Noah B The Savage Gardener March 09, 2018 11:49 AM  

Corception offers the possibility of making brief and catchy arguments that would be lost if every nuance had to be addressed.

Normies get it. It inflames cucks and leftes because they know it's effective.

Blogger Unknown March 09, 2018 2:15 PM  

So I guess this is literally semantics. Deception is bad, we're looking for the good version. I'd call it euception, I think it rolls better off the tongue.

Blogger R Beisert March 09, 2018 2:26 PM  

I felt like dropping a few connected thoughts here, in the hopes that someone might find an answer from such prompts.

It brings to mind the idea of the "Kenobi Truth" - something that is true to a point, from a certain perspective, but which lacks the fullness of correct and precise truth.

I am also reminded not only of the parables, but of the zen koans and ancient myths. Such stories are openly non-historical, yet they contain within them deeper truths that are hard to impart without such rhetorical devices. They are analogies, of a sort, metaphors that convey a truth not explicitly stated but imparted through processing of effective rhetoric.

I think, for those interested in a common term that appears less daunting to the ill-informed, the answer lies along such lines. Myths and analogies which impart truth. Imprecise statetements that impart abstract but meaningful truths. Something along the lines of "analogous truth," perhaps.

Blogger Bird on a Wing March 09, 2018 2:35 PM  

A word to express the concept of something that is technically false but rhetorically true that tends to guide one towards the truth.

The fake-news media went to the well of comedian-speak and tried to use the neologism truthiness for a couple of years. Of course, by “truth” they meant “lies”, and their purpose was propaganda, not understanding. And now “truthiness” in the way that everyone sees that they use it, has acquired an unspoken connotation of “sneakiness”.

Fable is a synonym for parable, but its modern English connotation has a mythic element – a “fabled” event. Aesop is no Jesus, but he has his uses.

I think it was Hegel who hijacked “dialectic” for his own purposes because of the moral authority imbued to it by Aristotle.

One can see the historical moral connotation of words by how they have been (deliberately or subconsciously) morphed by modern language users and the modern connotations that have taken precedence over the original meaning. “Rhetoric” as Aristotle used it had no connotation of falsity, but now it is used to mean “politician-speak”, or “just rhetoric” meaning words only – flowery, meaningless ones, with no substance or real-ness.

I think the neologism corceptive is as commonly useful as those science-y ones that I can never remember.
The best, most useful and viral neologisms always seem to come from the Comedy framework. (Think about it: “fake-news media” is great because it’s pun to call the so-serious tv newsreader Fake, and especially to his face. We all think Trump is such a lucky man to be able to do so whenever he wants, and in his position, he represents all of us.)

Etymology is useful, but only as an analytical framework. This is because etymology is descriptive and not creative; science not art.

I have been reading the comedian Owen Benjamin’s Twitter feed. His father, interestingly enough, is, or was, a professor of communication and rhetoric, and so Owen has a deep well to draw from as he creates his Comedy.

Also: Shakespeare.

Blogger MycroftJones March 09, 2018 2:51 PM  

Is there a reason that the old word "Hyperbole" doesn't cover the meaning intended by your new word, corception. Hyperbole is the word I always heard used to describe Jesus true but exagerated and factually not 100% accurate statements.

Blogger SirHamster March 09, 2018 3:09 PM  

Felix Bellator wrote:I am still looking for a word that means the opposite of surprise. Like, "SJWs always lie. Anti-surprise!" Please help....

This is in reaction to a sudden event? Otherwise, it'd simply be expected.

"Curse your unexpected yet inevitable betrayal!"


Chesapean wrote:DEceit and CONceit are opposites, although we have little cultural awareness these days that conceits can be beneficial.

Deception - Conception?


MycroftJones wrote:Is there a reason that the old word "Hyperbole" doesn't cover the meaning intended by your new word, corception. Hyperbole is the word I always heard used to describe Jesus true but exagerated and factually not 100% accurate statements.

Not all hyperbole is pointing to truth. This is a word to capture the subset of hyperbole or rhetoric that "tends to guide one towards the truth."

Blogger ReluctantMessiah March 09, 2018 3:26 PM  

The opposite of Corception is the Intellectual but Idiot illustrated by Taleb's Skin in the Game. Arguing over theories and technicalities while falling further away from reality

Blogger Gary March 09, 2018 4:45 PM  

If one works on the basis that rhetoric is based on truth, then hyperbole is the word for the job:

https://www.etymonline.com/word/hyperbole

Blogger VD March 09, 2018 4:47 PM  

If one works on the basis that rhetoric is based on truth, then hyperbole is the word for the job:

But it isn't. So that doesn't work.

OpenID Sidehill Dodger March 09, 2018 5:24 PM  

VD wrote:I thought Aristotle's definition of rhetoric covered this in that rhetoric should point to the truth, even if the statement is specifically false.

That's wrong. The more rhetoric points to the truth, the more effective it is. But rhetoric that points to falsehood is still rhetoric.


If I understand you correctly, you don't want to include the second sort of rhetoric--that which points to falsehood--under your neologism. Is that correct? I think so, for if you weren't making that distinction, then we wouldn't need the new word, "rhetoric" would cover it.

But is that the definition of "Corception": honest rhetoric? I think maybe you want to cast a wider net than this. In fact, I'm not sure that what you want is narrow enough to be covered by a single word. You want persuasive techniques that don't mislead, but lead to the truth. You don't want to include formal argument. Hmm. But persuasion isn't restricted to words, is it? Or is that part of the meaning of "corception"? If not, then images could come under that heading.

The Charlie Chaplin parody of Hitler comes to mind. Effective, and not untrue. How about that newsreel short of Hitler doing a thigh-slapping jig? That was actually a film loop of a single gesture that made Hitler seem like a total nutball, childish and arrogant at once. Very effective propaganda. It was a distortion of the truth, though...would you include either of these under "corception"?

Azure A. mentioned entertainment above. Entertainment can--and does--carry a propaganda payload. It's why I haven't been able to watch television, and very few Hollywood movies, for decades. The music, of course, is too sickening to contemplate. Depending on the skill of the screenwriter, the propaganda may be so subtle that few people will even notice that it's there. But it does its work whether you notice it or not.

If you made a movie, or a comic book, that subtly conveyed Alt-Right views, would that come under "corception"? You wouldn't be lying, of course, and acting out of the highest motives. But I think "propaganda" covers it; though propaganda isn't necessarily evil, of course. You're just trying to help people see the truth.

Making up nicknames for enemies that stick is one of our esteemed G.E.'s favorite tactics. (See tinyurl.com/yc6vu9he for a good list--Trigger Warning link to CNN!). Is that corception? It's about on the same level as drawing a quick caricature, I suppose.

At this point, I don't see a compelling case for making up a new word to cover things like this. It seems to me that the range of things to be covered is too wide for one word, and we have existing words for those things.

Blogger Gary March 09, 2018 5:52 PM  

I thought you always said that effective rhetoric has to have an element of truth?

As we're on the subject of new words, I created one: devilisation (instead of civilisation), to describe the state of an unGodly barbaric world such as the one we now inhabit. Anyone wants to use it, please be my guest.

Blogger Azure Amaranthine March 09, 2018 6:57 PM  

"I thought you always said that effective rhetoric has to have an element of truth?"

See, that's just the point though. Truth isn't essential to rhetoric at all.

It simply makes it considerably more effective.

Rhetoric is still rhetoric when it's nothing more than one big web of deceit.

Blogger Felix Bellator March 09, 2018 8:09 PM  

@EIA, yes, that works to.

@Azure and @SirHamster, I tried those, but to me they did not convey a sense of irony or exaggeration implied by being the opposite of surprise accompanying the obviousness of an event or action that was not obvious to the slow witted or Commies. Though I did not specify that in my earlier post, so it wasn't a real requirement until now. :)

Blogger Felix Bellator March 09, 2018 8:12 PM  

@VD - corception does not appear on Infogalactic. If I get a user account would I be able to add it?

OpenID paulmurray March 10, 2018 1:50 AM  

" technically false but rhetorically true that tends to guide one towards the truth"

The word you are after is "truthy", the noun being "truthyness".

Blogger C.B. Robertson March 10, 2018 2:43 AM  

@Vox Is this in any way meaningfully different than Bret Weinstein's concept of "metaphorical truth" (examples being "porcupines can throw their quills" or "all guns are always loaded")? Your use here as a rhetorical implement, rather than a rule of thumb, leaves room for a possible distinction, but you seem to be touching on a subject that Weinstein, Scott Adams, and Dr. Jordan Peterson have been playing around with.

Blogger SciVo March 10, 2018 5:57 AM  

Unknown wrote:So I guess this is literally semantics. Deception is bad, we're looking for the good version. I'd call it euception, I think it rolls better off the tongue.

I like it!

Felix Bellator wrote:@Azure and @SirHamster, I tried those, but to me they did not convey a sense of irony or exaggeration implied by being the opposite of surprise accompanying the obviousness of an event or action that was not obvious to the slow witted or Commies.

In that case, the proper phrasing would be something like "what an unsurprise" or "how shockingly normal." Of course it's all in the delivery, and there are many variations, such as "straight out of modelsville" or "unbelievably postdictable."

Blogger yoghi.llama March 10, 2018 6:56 AM  

"Shkotzim hasbara"?

"White taqiyya"?

Blogger Solaire Of Astora March 10, 2018 11:22 AM  

This is basically what Trump did when he slightly exaggerated the black gun crime rate or whatever it was. He got the media to report the actual numbers which are still bad enough that they would never do that without being forced to by something like Trump's 'lie'. I think this is because the truth and honesty are actually different dimensions. Honesty is about intent while truth is something external and not always fully knowable. This actually reminds me of Jordan Peterson's fumbling definition of truth. For an eloquent guy he really failed in that debate with Harris. Leave it to Vox Day to solve the problem for him.

Blogger VD March 11, 2018 9:19 AM  

@VD - corception does not appear on Infogalactic. If I get a user account would I be able to add it?

Yes.

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