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Monday, September 09, 2019

Parliament suspended

The British Prime Minister is putting an end to the scheming of the Remain Parliament:
Boris Johnson will suspend Parliament tonight for five weeks amid Remainer fury at claims he could try to sabotage their No Deal law.

Downing Street confirmed prorogation will happen this evening even if - as expected - the PM loses his latest effort to force a snap election.

The move was condemned as a 'disgrace' by Labour, even though a rebel law ruling out No Deal by Halloween will be on the statute books by then.

It will spare Mr Johnson from having to give evidence to the powerful cross-party Liaison Committee on Wednesday - as well as preventing further rebellions designed to tie the government's hands more tightly.

Mr Johnson is scrambling to find a way of sidestepping rebel legislation ordering him to beg the EU for an extension if no agreement has been agreed by October 19.
I don't understand what all the need for the drama concerning the extension request is. If I was Boris Johnson, I would suspend Parliament, obey the law by dutifully requesting a one-day extension to November 1, 2019, announce the inevitable rejection of the request by the EU, then proceed with a general election and a No-Deal Brexit while the Remainers waste their time arguing that the one-day extension isn't the specified 90120-day extension.

This isn't that hard.

UPDATE: The poison dwarf, aka Speaker of the House of Commons, (((John Bercow))) is on his way out.
Commons Speaker jumps before he is pushed saying he will stand down amid huge Tory backlash at his handling of Brexit - but insists he won't go until October 31 AFTER the UK's departure is delayed. Speaker John Bercow has dramatically announced that he is standing down the the Commons next month. Mr Bercow was facing the Tories running a candidate against him at the election amid fury at Brexit handling. He had caused fury by bending House of Commons procedures so Remainer rebel law could be passed 

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85 Comments:

Blogger Salt September 09, 2019 9:15 AM  

Make any extension to November 5th.

Blogger Jonathon Davies September 09, 2019 9:32 AM  

VD: "It isn't hard."

No, it isn't. However, Boris wants Theresa May's deal minus the backstop. That's what he's doing in Ireland today. He will challenge the Remoaner surrender bill in the courts, most likely. Then say to the EU it's no deal or May's deal without the Northern Ireland backstop.

Blogger Jab Burrwalky September 09, 2019 9:33 AM  

It's really refreshing to see a British politician with a backbone for once. here's hoping he deals with these rebels more effectively than most British monarchs ever have.

Blogger RomanCandle September 09, 2019 9:46 AM  

Good for Boris and Dom Cummings. A tyrannical parliament is just as bad as a tyrannical king.

Blogger MendoScot September 09, 2019 9:48 AM  

The EUrocrats are so full of themselves that it would be trivially easy to couch the request in terms that would drive them to a frothing rage and to deny any extension.

But the 24 hour extension would do exactly the same to the Remoaners.

Decisions, decisions...

Blogger Theworldisnotenough September 09, 2019 9:49 AM  

The extension has to be four months or whatever else the EU offers. It is then agreed by the PM or parliament votes on it.

Blogger justaguy September 09, 2019 9:51 AM  

Can't Boris add other poison pills, such as EU gives 100B pounds as a extension gift or the like? The EU would have to actually come up with and propose on their own a reasonable extension that the October Parliament would accept. Same for any Brexit-- make the EU come up with something that Boris can't kill on their own.

Blogger Theworldisnotenough September 09, 2019 10:02 AM  

This has all been arranged between the fifth column in Parliament and the EU. Then the media spins it as if they are saving the country from destruction. Boris cannot be controlled directly so the EU uses parliament to control him

Blogger Lazarus September 09, 2019 10:08 AM  

In order for the bill to become law, Her Majesty must assent to it.



"If the monarch were given clear and firm Prime Ministerial advice that she should withhold her royal assent to a Bill which had passed through the Houses of Parliament, it seems to be the case that the monarch should follow that advice."

Boris has the confidence of Parliament, and is the PM.

Whether this takes place remains to be seen.


BJ Rope-a-Dope

Blogger CarpeOro September 09, 2019 10:10 AM  

Sometimes you just need to feed your opponents enough rope to make sure they hang themselves.

"Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake." Napoleon Bonaparte

And the Remainers appear to keep doing so. As long as Boris doesn't get too cocky and forget to pull the trigger before they leave the cross-hair.

Blogger Azimus September 09, 2019 10:17 AM  

VD:
"requesting a one-day extension to November 1, 2019


That does have the air of English cunning. Or calling them at 3am and nobody picked up the phone...

Blogger Dave Dave September 09, 2019 10:23 AM  

Macron is tired of this fluffery. Merkel isn't fit to negotiate any kind of new deal because she's currently suffering from kuru. Boris is correctly calling the bluff of the Retard Remainers and there will be nothing to stop the Halloween Brexit. I am very doubtful Boris will leave with Theresa's terrible deal, since that was never a real Brexit. I'm excited for the Boris-Nigel tag-team that will happen after next election.

Blogger DonReynolds September 09, 2019 10:30 AM  

Two Prime Ministers can play the same game.

Just as May cooked up a deal that made a negotiated Brexit much worse than actually staying in the EU, Johnson can cook up a deal that would make the EU commissioners puke their guts out, specifically, remaining in the EU in name only, but with NONE of the obligations.

We live in a dual world after all and the gate swings both ways.

Blogger Weak September 09, 2019 10:38 AM  

Good call Salt. 05 November would be the right day for this.

Blogger DonReynolds September 09, 2019 10:53 AM  

In politics, there are very few surprises, even if it comes as a complete surprise to the public and the news media, those who need to know are seldom surprised. The people who matter pay a great deal to be in the know, in advance, on important matters, because it is vital that they get a good seat in advance of the performance.

All executive and legislative matters are scripted in advance, even the talking points, even who will break the story to the public. Government has the advantage of rapid communication and computers to do what was intended all along.

By Halloween, everyone who matters will have a good seat. The Americans will show up with the cash, as they normally do, and the usual suspects will put on a show of emotion and drop a few tears about being better off, crying all the way to the bank.

If only the Atlantic were as narrow as the English Channel, then everything would be perfect in the British mind, except the Americans would still be Over Here, Over Paid, and Over Sexed.

All Europeans hate when Americans meddle and interfere in naughty European politics and screw everything up, until they beg for Americans to correct their diplomatic blunders at bayonet point, village by village.

Blogger wahr01 September 09, 2019 10:54 AM  

The legislation calls for a minimum of January or "whatever the EU says".

Boris was an idiot to call off the lords' filibuster, which was on-track to delay the sabotage bill right into the brick wall of prorogation.

Now he has but one option: Defy parliament and the high court's orders long enough to run out the clock, then hope he gets the chance to be bailed out by the voters.

Blogger Damelon Brinn September 09, 2019 10:58 AM  

"Mr. Johnson is scrambling..."

I don't know anything about the UK system, but I know how to read the media. When they say one of the good guys is "scrambling," it means he actually has the upper hand.

Blogger wahr01 September 09, 2019 11:02 AM  

This comment has been removed by the author.

Blogger Timmy3 September 09, 2019 11:17 AM  

Parliament cries for a deal. Theresa May already agreed to one. Put it up for another vote and move on.

Blogger Shimshon September 09, 2019 11:34 AM  

justaguy wrote:Can't Boris add other poison pills, such as EU gives 100B pounds as a extension gift or the like? The EU would have to actually come up with and propose on their own a reasonable extension that the October Parliament would accept. Same for any Brexit-- make the EU come up with something that Boris can't kill on their own.

Yes, Boris can demand full participation in CAP.

We are all told that stands for Common Agricultural Policy.

That's just a cover. It's really Cannibal Access Program. Once Boris demands his proper share, the EU folds.

Blogger Brick Hardslab September 09, 2019 11:39 AM  

Does the Queen still have a say?

Blogger C-Speaks September 09, 2019 11:40 AM  

"The move was condemned as a disgrace by Labour". That's how you know its good.

Blogger Jack Amok September 09, 2019 11:56 AM  

Now he has but one option: Defy parliament and the high court's orders...

That's always the only option when dealing with Leftists anyway. They've proven they themselves will defy any law or court order inconvenient to them whenever they can.

Blogger Hbogbinder September 09, 2019 12:03 PM  

From the EU side, extension approval requires unanimity, I think. Has Boris perhaps already struck a deal with a euroskeptic head of state on the continent for a surprise last-minute veto? Or, heck, maybe even Macron just wants the UK out. The French never wanted them in in the first place.

Blogger Steve September 09, 2019 12:08 PM  

I don't understand what all the need for the drama concerning the extension request is. If I was Boris Johnson, I would suspend Parliament, obey the law by dutifully requesting a one-day extension to November 1, 2019

Sadly, the EU's legal department and their co-conspirators on the slime green benches have anticipated this.

The Act helpfully contains the form letter which it declares the Prime Minister must send.

But the SDL is on the right path. There's been much waffle about Boris "breaking the law". That's the one thing he must absolutely not do, or his enemies will gut him. Instead, he should delay, challenge, or creatively comply with all relevant legislation with an appropriate figleaf of legal advice.

Blogger wahr01 September 09, 2019 12:12 PM  

There's been much waffle about Boris "breaking the law". That's the one thing he must absolutely not do, or his enemies will gut him.

How exactly will they do that without triggering the election they're running from?

I don't see a problem here.
Heads, he wins, tails, they lose.
Call
their
Bluff!

Blogger Franz Lyonheart September 09, 2019 12:29 PM  

obey the law by dutifully requesting a one-day extension to November 1, 2019

Doesn't the law specify the date 31 January? Does anybody know the details of the Surrender Bill?

The crux of the problem that parliament is incapable if agreeing on a new prime minister, and neither on a new election which would break the impasse and assign a majority to a PM - whoever that might be, presumably Boris again.

Parliament in their illogic are unable to comprehend that No Deal isn't a thing, as much as the Remoaner-MSM tries to frame it as one for propaganda purposes. And you cannot approve (or reject) a non-thing.

In fact, it's the absence of a thing - namely, having a deal. If you don't agree a deal, you literally have : no deal. And the increasingly hostile counterparty - the EU27 - gets a vote.

The one deal they had proposed - bad as Treason May's BRINO withdrawal agreement was - that inept parliament rejected also.

So now, they try to micromanage in exacting detail how the Prime Minister should be doing the prime ministering. Writing note just law, but the execution of such law, into law. That's preposterous.

And there are so many ways the PM can torpedo such ridiculous micromanagement:
- send two letters. The first a copy paste of the parliamentary Surrender Bill, the second : "here's what the UK government really thinks
- on 1st November, the EU governments must have appointed their Commissioners. That's probably one of the reasons for the 31st October deadline. Boris could refuse to do so, and render the EU dysfunctional. If they want to change the rules, he can veto the change.
- or just veto everything from 1st November onwards, because "British National interest".
- all of the above - indicate in his second letter that he intends to use the membership states' veto powers very liberally.

There's a reason why parliaments can't function as governments. Why legislative and executive powers are separate. The shenanigans of the Remoaner Parliament notwithstanding.

Blogger Steve September 09, 2019 12:58 PM  

wahr - Because the PM needs to preserve his legitimacy. Surrendering that to his enemies would be a strategic error.

Blogger wahr01 September 09, 2019 1:01 PM  

Steve wrote:wahr - Because the PM needs to preserve his legitimacy. Surrendering that to his enemies would be a strategic error.

Are you by chance related to Ben Shapiro?

His "legitimacy" comes from the mandate of the 2016 referendum, and his opponents have already demonstrated their contempt for legitimate government by breaking every parliamentary procedure to hamstring what the people have demanded in a clear vote.

Blogger Steve September 09, 2019 1:10 PM  

His "legitimacy" comes from the mandate of the 2016 referendum

No, it comes from being the lawful Prime Minister. If he removed the lawful part, he'd quickly find himself permanently deprived of the prime minister bit.

Blogger wahr01 September 09, 2019 1:12 PM  

Steve wrote:His "legitimacy" comes from the mandate of the 2016 referendum

No, it comes from being the lawful Prime Minister. If he removed the lawful part, he'd quickly find himself permanently deprived of the prime minister bit.


And that would trigger an election, with an electorate that voted for FARAGE by a landslide in the last national poll.

Blogger John Best. September 09, 2019 1:29 PM  

In one week Boris has done the job Thatcher utterly failed to do, rid the Conservative party of most of the Pro-EU MP's. This is a real achievement. He has already done an excellent job. Morale Rising.

Blogger Steve September 09, 2019 1:36 PM  

No, it wouldn't automatically trigger an election. It would trigger his immediate removal from office, to the delight of the cucks in his own party (and all the Bilderberg creepy crawlies Boris has managed to shoo off would be back in a heartbeat), then a Remain cabal forming a new government for just long enough to kill Brexit stone dead by agreeing some sort of associate status with the EU, which they would call "Brexit".

A few weeks or months later there would be an election, in which the Brexit Party would do well in the polls but probably fail to make a serious dent in Parliamentary arithmetic thanks to FPTP, postal vote fraud, and the complete lack of interest from the highly politicised Electoral Commission in ensuring a fair election.

The rest of the political establishment would be fully back under Remaincuck control, and - with an assist from our corrupt media and increasingly partisan internet giants - they'd successfully crowd out any future Faragist insurrections for the foreseeable. Having learned their lesson from 2016, we'd never be offered a referendum on anything important ever again.

So your advice is a surefire shortcut to losing bigly.

Acting like a dictator only works when you're an actual dictator, it's incredibly risky and foolish for politicians under hostile scrutiny by the legislature and courts, which is why President Trump has been very careful to ensure he obeys the letter of the law and use the considerable executive and administrative power he has in clever ways.

Blogger John Best. September 09, 2019 1:44 PM  

@33 Steve = low morale.

Blogger Sterling Pilgrim September 09, 2019 1:47 PM  

Where we wrong about Ringo?? /s
https://mobile.twitter.com/StevieBrexit/status/1170750707537981445

Blogger Steve September 09, 2019 1:48 PM  

John Best - I am literally teaching you how to win. Sad!

Blogger Snidely Whiplash September 09, 2019 1:48 PM  

Steve lives in Britain and has 20 IQ point on you.

Blogger Snidely Whiplash September 09, 2019 2:02 PM  

Sterling Pilgrim wrote:Where we wrong about Ringo?
No. We all agreed he's a great guy, very smart, and decent, hard-working. But some clowns tried to assert that Ringo is a great drummer.

Blogger doctrev September 09, 2019 2:15 PM  

Steve wrote:
Acting like a dictator only works when you're an actual dictator, it's incredibly risky and foolish for politicians under hostile scrutiny by the legislature and courts, which is why President Trump has been very careful to ensure he obeys the letter of the law and use the considerable executive and administrative power he has in clever ways.


Thank you for this quality explanation. I have to admit, I was a bit cautious in my own assessment of how far the British government would go to stop their own Prime Minister. I never dreamed they would risk the party by having two dozen Conservatives betray their caucus and their voters, all while destroying the very legitimacy of the British Parliament. Johnson will probably succeed in de-selecting them, but there's no guarantee of that. British courts are as corrupt as American ones.

I'm just surprised the bill was given royal assent without the approval of the Prime Minister or his cabinet. Unless Nigel Farage is right, as he usually is, and Boris Johnson is truly pushing for a modified Chequers deal like Theresa May. That part is not going to matter: if the PM fails to deliver on actual Brexit, the Remainers won't be able to hold back the fury that will sweep them all away before Christmas.

Blogger weka September 09, 2019 2:41 PM  

@33. This is why the electoral terms act needs to be repealed. The correct position for a PM when they lose a vote such as the surrender bill is to seek a snap election, win it, and then repeal it. Having a fixed term and a two thirds majority for such an act does not work.

Your analysis is precisely what the elite want. They conseuqeneces will be a hostile country aoutside London.

Pretty much how the Aussies see Canberra, the Kiwis Wellington, and the Western Canadians Toronto and Ottawa. This has not been stable.

And the last act has not been played out.

Blogger MendoScot September 09, 2019 2:43 PM  

A good summary at the Claremont Review.

Brexit was not an “outburst” or a cry of despair or a message to the European Commission. It was an eviction notice. It was an explicit withdrawal of the legal sanction under which Brussels had governed Europe’s most important country. If it is really Britain’s wish to see its old constitutional arrangements restored, then this notice is open to emendation and reconsideration. But as things stand now, the Leave vote made E.U. rule over the U.K. illegitimate. Not illegitimate only when Brussels has been given one last chance to talk Britain out of it, but illegitimate now. What Britons voted for in 2016 was to leave the European Union—not to ask permission to leave the European Union. It is hard to see how Britain’s remaining in the E.U. would benefit either side.

And yet, given that Britain is the first country to issue such an ultimatum, given that pro-E.U. elites in other European countries have reason to fear its replication, given the moral ambitions of the E.U. project, given that the British who support Remain have transferred their sentiments and their allegiances across the channel, given the social disparity between those who rule the E.U. and most of those who want to leave it, how could the reaction of Britain’s establishment be anything but all-out administrative, judicial, economic, media, political, and parliamentary war? The battle against Brexit is being fought, Europe-wide, with all the weaponry a cornered elite has at its disposal.

It has proved sufficient so far.


So far...

It makes the point that one of the pillars of the globalists movement - judicial review of political decisions - had been hacked out from under them by Brexit. And they are very unhappy about it.

Blogger Steve September 09, 2019 2:59 PM  

Snidely - thanks, I have been struck on the head recently, so you are probably correct!

doctrev - NP. Royal Assent isn't really within the PM's gift, it's basically automatic once the Bill clears Parliament. It's theoretically possible for the Cabinet to effectively withhold Assent - with the Sovereign's agreement - but this is so rarely done it's effectively a constitutional crisis scenario and they didn't want to be seen as "dragging the Queen into politics". Seems the government decided to spend its limited political capital in other ways - they've repeatedly stated they won't ask for an extension, so I'm expecting a "legal" solution.

Much as I admire Farage, he's not always right (remember, on Brexit referendum night he conceded defeat twice before the cock crowed). His general approach is like Breitbart News - constant clickbait-tier outrage and everything is BETRAYAL MOST FOUL. Like Breitbart News, this appeals to an enthusiastic, but limited, section of the public. Personally, I find it wearying. I voted for the Brexit Party, but avoid their propaganda as it's just to dumb. (Boris aside, British right wingers still haven't learned how to emulate Trump's irrepressible good humour and positivity)

If Boris is plotting to sell us down la Manche, the Extension/Surrender Bill makes his job harder, not easier. The "deal" Theresa May "negotiated" is politically radioactive. The only way of obtaining even a cosmetic change to it requires the leverage that a ticking clock provides.

I wouldn't trust Mr Johnson with my wallet or my wife, but so far he's doing a great job with limited political wiggle room and enemies on all sides. He's consistently claimed to want some sort of "deal" with the EU, thankfully the machinations of his foes are aligning his political survival with "No Deal".

Blogger wahr01 September 09, 2019 3:16 PM  

This comment has been removed by the author.

Blogger wahr01 September 09, 2019 3:17 PM  

Steve wrote:John Best - I am literally teaching you how to win. Sad!

I'm not seeing a winnning strategy here, i'm just seeing calls for cucking.

Where in your little waltz does actual "brexit" happen, as opposed to bending the UK over and assuming the position?

Blogger Nate September 09, 2019 3:19 PM  

it's time for the monarchy to reassert itself

Blogger Nate September 09, 2019 3:31 PM  

then you're a blind moron.

Blogger wahr01 September 09, 2019 3:36 PM  

Nate wrote:then you're a blind moron.

My eyes are wide open, friend.
Appealing to a bureaucratic process long since shattered by leftist remainers which offers zero escape routes is not "winning"

Blogger Cataline Sergius September 09, 2019 3:41 PM  

Nate wrote:it's time for the monarchy to reassert itself

Not when the monarch is 93 and Charles is the next in line.

Blogger Cataline Sergius September 09, 2019 3:45 PM  

@Steve

I'm genuinely curious, how would Boris get his snap election?

Blogger Steve September 09, 2019 3:51 PM  

I'm not seeing a winnning strategy here

I am Steve's complete lack of surprise. Not all rides are suitable for the lil' fellas.

Where in your little waltz does actual "brexit" happen, as opposed to bending the UK over and assuming the position?

By clinging on to power via whichever hook/crook interface is necessary and available, the government can simply run the clock down on its enemies until we leave, using its (not unlimited, but formidable) executive privileges to see off rival plots. As long as no extension is obtained and Boris Johnson remains Prime Minister, he can simply refuse Queen's Consent to any forthcoming attempt to revoke Article 50 before October 31, and then we're out. (Nota Benny for the hard of thinking - he can't do this from jail even if he does get a wicked prison tat saying BREXIT 4 LYFE)

Unless they do something mongoloidally self-harming that's the political equivalent of sticking a cucumber up its collective arse and running bollock-naked into a field of hungry donkeys, like what you suggested.

This is a high stakes game of baccarat and your proposed move is to fling your own poop at the croupier while masturbating furiously. No, Mr Bond, I don't believe we do serve "tendies" in this establishment.

Blogger wahr01 September 09, 2019 3:58 PM  

Steve wrote:
Where in your little waltz does actual "brexit" happen, as opposed to bending the UK over and assuming the position?

By clinging on to power via whichever hook/crook interface is necessary and available, the government can simply run the clock down on its enemies until we leave, using its (not unlimited, but formidable) executive privileges to see off rival plots. As long as no extension is obtained and Boris Johnson remains Prime Minister, he can simply refuse Queen's Consent to any forthcoming attempt to revoke Article 50 before October 31, and then we're out.


The law they just rammed through makes this 100% illegal, forces a form letter into his hand and gives him a "legal requirement" to deliver said form letter by 10/19.

There's no "running down the clock" unless he point-blank refuses to obey the law.

He either raises both middle fingers on 10/19 and drags out the process of his removal or the UK is dragged through this for another 4 months.

Blogger Steve September 09, 2019 4:00 PM  

Cataline Sergius - He basically can't unless 3/4 of Parliament agrees to it, which they won't while he's leading in the polls and we're still legally headed for Brexit.

A vote of no confidence might lead to an election, but the opposition gets first dibs at forming a government - too risky for the government's purposes. I expect the opposition to try this in October though.

Some theories floating around that the PM can use the Civil Contingencies Act to suspend the law and call an early election. This has never been tested before so I dunno.

Blogger Steve September 09, 2019 4:08 PM  

There's no "running down the clock" unless he point-blank refuses to obey the law.

No, because

The law they just rammed through makes this 100% illegal

This is the bit the government should dispute.

Just as you don't con a mark by saying "hello, my name's wahr01 and I'll be your grifter for this evening...", the head of government must always frame everything he does as lawful and constitutional, and produce a legal argument as to why when pressed. Especially when it isn't.

Do you see?

Blogger wahr01 September 09, 2019 4:09 PM  

@53

"We'll just depend on the remainer high court to help us drag our feet, that worked so well for Trump"

Ben Shapiro would be proud.

Blogger xevious2030 September 09, 2019 4:12 PM  

"Acting like a dictator only works when you're an actual dictator"

Anything in mind? If the illusion of law is the problem, then how to rip it to shreds?

Blogger Cataline Sergius September 09, 2019 4:12 PM  

@Steve

And here's are the questions that are really incomprehensible to an American.

Will the French reject an extension request?

If so, what is their motivation for doing so?

Blogger Steve September 09, 2019 4:21 PM  

xevious - it's not really an illusion of law if they really can and will use it against you. There's only two solutions:

* Gas the cucks, Brexit war now
* Work with what you've got and change the people when you can

For some reason, Boris Johnson (much like Donald Trump) is going with Plan B for now. I can't even remember how many fake "conservative" MP's he's removed or forced into announcing their resignations or retirement - something like 30 and they're still trickling out.

This isn't even "about" Brexit anymore, it's part of a broader, long overdue, political realignment going on across the West. There's no magic bullet or quick fix, because the structural problem of the political, institutional, and big business class going feral-globalist didn't happen overnight.

Blogger Steve September 09, 2019 4:26 PM  

Will the French reject an extension request?

I doubt it (Macron is no de Gaulle or even Petain, he's a wholly owned Globohomo asset), but even the EU must have its limits.

Blogger MC September 09, 2019 4:29 PM  

Comment from a (rare) non-hysterical SJW on the Guardian


Batters56 6m ago


It seems to me to be abundantly clear what the Government is planning to do given the competing bills that the House has passed regarding a no deal Brexit. Namely to argue in court that it’s not clear what the House wants.

Whilst the mood of the house is clear that it wants an extension, what it has passed into law is a muddle. The exit day of 31st October 2019 as specified previously still stands as far as I can see. In the amendments section of the Benn bill I can’t see that it removes/amends that date in the previous legislation. Yet it also of course instructs the prime minister to secure an extension until January.

So coming to a Supreme Court near you will soon be the booming voice of the attorney general complaining that the opposition is accusing the Government of breaking the law whilst simultaneously instructing them to do so.

Blogger wahr01 September 09, 2019 4:29 PM  

Steve wrote:
This isn't even "about" Brexit anymore, it's part of a broader, long overdue, political realignment going on across the West.


Apparently the re-alignment toward EU neo-communist dicatorship, because that's what happens if you continue to play by old rules your opposition no longer obey.

Blogger White Knight Leo #0368 September 09, 2019 4:35 PM  

Does the new law really only require him to request an extension? That seems like a good target for malicious compliance.

Blogger xevious2030 September 09, 2019 4:48 PM  

Illusion was not about using law against Johnson. If he violates law here, they will use it against him here, is a given. “A” is an answer, which, as you have said, is benched for “B.” And no quick fixes. Johnson has legitimacy. The rest of Parliament has legitimacy. Considering the previous, my question was focused more on how Johnson can delegitimize Parliament to the British. The illusion of law shattered in the people, without shattering the resolve of the people?

Blogger wahr01 September 09, 2019 4:58 PM  

@62

The parliament has already delegitimized itself.

Bercow dousing the rulebook in gasoline, lighting it on fire, and tossing it out into the Thames whenever it looks like Brexit will happen is very public evidence of that.

Blogger Steve September 09, 2019 5:00 PM  

That seems like a good target for malicious compliance.

Yes.

how Johnson can delegitimize Parliament to the British. The illusion of law shattered in the people, without shattering the resolve of the people

Parliament is already about as popular as a DVD box set of Jimmy Savile children's shows. That's why they're not so keen on an election.

Blogger Centurion Revolt September 09, 2019 5:10 PM  

That hasn't happened since 1707 and it was called a constitutional crisis even then. There's no way the Monarch gets involved in 2019.

Blogger xevious2030 September 09, 2019 5:20 PM  

"Parliament is already about as popular as a DVD box set of Jimmy Savile children's shows. That's why they're not so keen on an election."

That's about what I gathered. Shattered though. You had mentioned that Johnson has to "preserve his legitimacy." My take was in his relationship to Parliament, as a matter of law. They may be in ill repute, but they still are enforced, by themselves and the courts. And the people accept it, begrudgingly or not. How is that bond, no matter how weak it is, dissolved to that institution, while maintaining Johnsons bond? Keeping in mind what you have said on the paths that are out of play. My apologies, if I am unable to ask the question correctly to this point, I won't pester any further about it. And I appreciate the answers you have provided. Thank you.

Blogger Centurion Revolt September 09, 2019 5:25 PM  

Where's English Tom on this?

Blogger Nate73 September 09, 2019 5:34 PM  

My jewdar completely failed me, I thought by his appearance Bercow was a great patriotic guy.

Blogger Tom September 09, 2019 5:36 PM  

What happened? Did they find evidence of Bercow palling around with Jimmy Savile?

Blogger Steve September 09, 2019 5:50 PM  

You had mentioned that Johnson has to "preserve his legitimacy."

Yes. He needs to act like a legitimate Prime Minister, i.e. lawfully, or he'll be crushed.

For example, the government is being sued for proroguing Parliament. It's a waste of time. There's nothing the courts can do to stop Parliament being suspended, because Boris did so legally and with the consent of the monarch.

If he'd decided to skip all that procedural and constitutional stuff, and simply send MP's a text message telling them to piss off, or ask the Army to arrest them or whatever, he wouldn't be able to enforce it and if he tried to enforce it he'd no longer be PM.

So legitimacy = legality in this context.

Cromwell was able to suspend Parliament, fight wars and have the king beheaded because he had the New Model Army at his back. All Boris has is the law. But that's not a small thing.

Cromwell's regime didn't survive him by even a year because he never translated his military power into a legitimate system of government. If Boris pulls off his ambitions he'll change the course of British history forever.

How is that bond, no matter how weak it is, dissolved to that institution, while maintaining Johnsons bond?

It can't be. He's an elected member of Parliament. It'd be like the Queen demanding a republic but also wanting to remain a hereditary head of state.

The next best thing he can do is try to change the composition of parliament via an election. The obvious message in that election will be "take back control from these rogue MP's".

Thank you.

You're welcome.

Blogger wahr01 September 09, 2019 6:09 PM  

@70

Enjoy your little theory being torpedoed when the remainer high court turns around his "contest" with a pre-typed "f u" ruling just like Obama's Hawaiian judges.

Blogger Up from the pond September 09, 2019 6:30 PM  

If the rule of law were truly in effect in Britain, Brexit would have happened three years ago.

By pretending that the rule of law is being followed, and pearl-clutching at any suggestion that it's null and void, the small-c conservatives are compromisers and temporizers, which means that they aren't the 3D-chess-playing Clever Boys of their own imagination but instead are no other than the perennial, self-defeating cucks that they always were. They are cow-towing to bullies instead of punching them in the teeth as they should do, out of sheer cowardice pretending that their temporizing is staving off a civil war which in fact has already been in progress for some time.

This applies to the U.S. too. Eisenhower sent the 101st Airborne Division into Arkansas to abrogate local officialdom, so Trump certainly could and should arrest judges, representatives, mayors, governors.

I ain't holding my breath for that, but at least let's not lie to ourselves about what the situation is. There is no rule of law to preserve, just the digestion of cowards to avoid upsetting.

Blogger Steve September 09, 2019 6:53 PM  

By pretending that the rule of law is being followed, and pearl-clutching at any suggestion that it's null and void, the small-c conservatives are compromisers and temporizers, which means that they aren't the 3D-chess-playing Clever Boys of their own imagination but instead are no other than the perennial, self-defeating cucks that they always were. They are cow-towing to bullies instead of punching them in the teeth as they should do, out of sheer cowardice pretending that their temporizing is staving off a civil war which in fact has already been in progress for some time.

Yes, I dunno why cowardly cucks like President Trump and Prime Minister Johnson don't just send in the marines to arrest people if they don't do as they're told. Some people might argue that senior officers would just ignore those sorts of orders and that their domestic political enemies would love a free excuse to impeach and/or imprison them. But those people are yellow bellied cowardly custards.

According to noted scholars of Saturday morning cartoons from the 1980's, if we just boldly threaten to do karate on elected officials, judges, and civil servants, they'll immediately roll over and give us everything we want. And then the entire electorate will clap and we'll get free Dairy Queens for life.

It is time to fire up the shortbuses and ride eternal, shiny and chrome!

Vroom! Vroom, I say!

Blogger wahr01 September 09, 2019 7:00 PM  

Steve wrote:
Yes, I dunno why cowardly cucks like President Trump and Prime Minister Johnson don't just send in the marines to arrest people if they don't do as they're told.


Or, you know, for more substantive charges.

In Trump's case, for instance,wholesale violation of, in order of severity:
1 - numerous federal laws against human trafficking, aiding and abetting
2 - the insurrection act
3 - the supremacy clause of the US constitution

Boris doesn't have to send in troops to arrest anyone.
He can simply declare "muh remoaner law" contempt of the ultimate source of parliament's sovereighty: the voters, as expressed via referendum, and back that up by pointing to numerous breaches of parliamentary procedure and the head-long run from a proposed general election.

None of those require "force", simply a "spine" and a willingness to look reality in the face and admit globalists don't give one whit about "legitimacy" or "rule of law" or "will of the voters".

Blogger Up from the pond September 09, 2019 7:06 PM  

@73

"if we just boldly threaten to do karate on elected officials, judges, and civil servants, they'll immediately roll over and give us everything we want. And then the entire electorate will clap"

It's happened numerous times in American history, a subject with which you're unacquainted. But keep enjoying those Saturday morning cartoons.

Blogger James Dixon September 09, 2019 7:39 PM  

> Yes. He needs to act like a legitimate Prime Minister, i.e. lawfully, or he'll be crushed.

There's probably nothing illegal about calling out the Remainers for being the traitors to the British people they are, even if truth isn't an absolute defense in Britain.

Blogger doctrev September 09, 2019 8:07 PM  

I'd say it's the opposite. It's probably extremely illegal and equally truthful to declare that Remainers are traitors. Incitement to violence, remember Jo Cox, etc.

Steve, you're quite ably showing why it's important to live in a country before commenting on its politics. I don't live in Britain -right now-, so I can't comment on how well the current argument is being received. A lot of people are angry, in Britain and elsewhere, but whenever anyone goes to the guns there's a certain level of chance involved. Boris Johnson and Donald Trump, for whatever reason, are confident that they have this. I'm quite confident in Trump, less so in Boris, but either way both men have earned our trust.

And do they have Dairy Queens in London? You see Pret a Manger so often they might be re-classified as a weed, but I don't remember Dairy Queen.

Blogger tublecane September 09, 2019 9:24 PM  

All this "rebel" guff, is that from market research, or what? I don't even think the new Star Wars series calls the putative good guys rebels.

Blogger Raker_T September 09, 2019 9:45 PM  

This isn't merely politics across the pond; it will be a great morale boost for the right, a bitter defeat for the globalists. I know little of the government structure over there, save what I've read here (thank you) but I'm wondering what would happen if an emergency were to occur in the interim?

Blogger Up from the pond September 09, 2019 9:47 PM  

tublecane wrote:All this "rebel" guff, is that from market research, or what?

The traditional enemy names things by their opposite. Thus, enslavement = "liberation." Rejecting a referendum result = "democracy." And establishment wanker = "rebel."

Blogger wreckage September 09, 2019 10:38 PM  


Steve: thankyou for the details. You are a most patient man.

Blogger Hieroglyph September 10, 2019 1:17 AM  

Apparently they were singing The Red Flag in parliament. Is that the new EU anthem? Curious minds wish to know.

All good fun today, expect some High Court challenges soon.

Blogger Matt September 10, 2019 7:33 AM  

Boris has so far held firm that he will NOT ask for an extension as parliament has required.

Blogger xevious2030 September 10, 2019 10:53 AM  

Pretending there was no letter, and no ordered extension, what process is required to make Brexit official? Does Parliament need to vote, prepare a formal withdrawal declaration? Or would it just happen on October 31, PM says “we’re not in the EU anymore?” Not what is needed for a smooth transition, the minimum of what is actually required for it to be de facto.

Blogger xevious2030 September 10, 2019 11:21 AM  

A less fanciful way of putting it, assuming the EU denied the deal in the letter, and the new extension expired, what is the minimum that would be required for a no deal Brexit to become fact at that point? Not intended for a specific individual, just whomever might be interested in providing the answer to that question if so inclined. The procedure, not the politics.

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