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Thursday, November 21, 2019

Why won't you move?

Economists are upset that Americans aren't uprooting themselves from their communities as readily as the Baby Boomers and preceding generations did:
Mobility in the United States has fallen to record lows. In 1985, nearly 20 percent of Americans had changed their residence within the preceding 12 months, but by 2018, fewer than ten percent had. That’s the lowest level since 1948, when the Census Bureau first started tracking mobility.

The decline in Americans’ mobility has been staggering, as the chart below shows. Mobility rates have fallen for nearly every group, across age, gender, income, homeownership status, and marital status.

Declining mobility contributes to a host of economic and social issues: less economic dynamism, lower rates of innovation, and lower productivity. By locking people into place, it exacerbates inequality by limiting the economic opportunities for workers.

A wide range of explanations have been offered to account for these substantial declines in mobility. Many consider the culprit to be the economic crisis, which locked people into declining-value homes; others attribute it to the huge differential in the housing prices in expensive cities. Some economists contend that job opportunities have become similar across places, meaning people are less likely to move for work; others see rising student debt as a key factor that has kept young Americans in their parents’ basements.

Now, a new study from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York suggests that other, more emotional and psychological factors may be at work. The study uses data from the bank’s Survey of Consumer Expectations to examine the degree to which people’s attachment to their communities affects their willingness and ability to move. To get at this, they use data from the survey (which covers a monthly panel of 1,300 respondents and is nationally representative) to group Americans into the three mobility classes I identified in my book Who’s Your City: “the mobile” who have the means, education, and capability to move to spaces of opportunity; “the stuck” who lack the resources to relocate; and “the rooted” who have the resources to move, but prefer to stay where they are.

The survey identifies respondents’ most recent move, their probability of moving in the next two years, and other data related to moving including job opportunities and income prospects, housing costs, the distance from current home, costs of moving to various locations, crime rates, taxes, community values and norms, and proximity to family and friends. The researchers use these data to estimate the overall costs—what they call the “willingness to pay” or WTP—for people to move different locations. They then use statistical models to examine the importance of these psychological factors compared to other mostly financial explanations.

A significant reason for the decline in mobility is that many of us are highly attached to our towns. Nearly half of those in the survey (47 percent) identify as rooted. The rooted are disproportionately white, older, married, homeowners, and rural. Their reasons for not moving are more psychological than economic: proximity to family and friends, and their involvement in the local community or church.
Note the significance of the "disproportionately white" aspect of the so-called "rooted". In the 1950s and 1960s, even in the 1980s, all those Midwesterners who moved to California were moving, or so they assumed, to another white state. My parents moved from Massachusetts to Minnesota in the 1970s, then my parents' best friends moved from Minnesota to California in the 1980s. Both moves were textbooks moves made for purely economic reasons.

Would the latter move be made today? Almost certainly not.

Now keep in mind that the entire purpose of free trade's supposed economic benefits is to expand this labor mobility worldwide. The only price is the complete destruction of everything you know and love, including your relationships with your friends and family. So, it's good that the US labor mobility rate is falling, the real problem is that it can't fall fast enough to prevent the country from collapsing or preserve the remaining unity of the least-invaded states.

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133 Comments:

Blogger BastionHarm November 21, 2019 7:00 AM  

The rooted are disproportionately white, older, married, homeowners, and rural. Their reasons for not moving are more psychological than economic: proximity to family and friends, and their involvement in the local community or church.

No wonder whites are so despised. Seems that many of them are getting in the way of a perfectly functioning machine where all people are turned completely into efficient, interchangeable, uprooted, atomized, indistinguishable, input-output consumer-production units, with no attachments to anything but their own selfish manufactured impulses.

That cannot abide! We have to have unlimited economic growth!! What about the GDP!?! These are the most important things in this world, aren't they!?

I f***ing hate economists. They deserve the rope.

Blogger damaris.tighe November 21, 2019 7:07 AM  

Amazing to me that attachment to family and community was the last thing they thought of and a complete surprise!

Speaks volumes about our advanced thinkers.

Blogger Karen took the Kids November 21, 2019 7:08 AM  

The rooted are disproportionately white. As in real Americans.

Blogger Zaklog the Great November 21, 2019 7:08 AM  

I didn't appreciate this until I had children and they almost never see my parents. I suspect most Americans are the same in that regard. I live about a 20 hour drive from my parents. My sister and her family live two hours from us. My brother lives 3 hours from our hometown.

When I was single, or married with no kids, this wasn't a problem. Now, though, it hurts, and since we're close to my wife's family, this isn't changing. Vox is right: Labor mobility is the destruction of the family.

Blogger CM November 21, 2019 7:08 AM  

More to the economic unit known as "the individual" than money.

Who knew?

We have been in the same house for going on 11 years. We keep trying to move (we only had one in the incubator when we moved here), but the only place both of us want to move to lacks the work my husband qualifies for... but it's where our parents are. So our looking has been done with lead feet.

I'm happy to see there's so many rooted. I was concerned that was deteriorating, but 47% with the finances, ability, and skills to move but stay for community is much better than I thought. With the sub cultural movements supporting and affirming being rooted, do you think it will get stronger or weaker?

Blogger dienw November 21, 2019 7:09 AM  

The oligarchs do not see rootlessness as a good thing. Such rootedness is the means by which a family stabilizes and develops a network and has influence within a town; thereby, acquiring access to the levers of power.

Blogger Gettimothy November 21, 2019 7:14 AM  

Tucker Carlson answered those international cosmopolitans well when he asked, "and leave our great grandparents graves?"

The cursed are literally "no-where"; it makes sense they would work to destroy a sense of place for us.

The hell with them. We will keep, then reclaim our lands from sea to shining sea.

Blogger Daniel November 21, 2019 7:15 AM  

No. You move.

Blogger ZhukovG November 21, 2019 7:16 AM  

While anecdotal, I have observed that the "Mobile" within Southern families, even when they do move, rarely move outside of states of The Old Confederacy. So they appear disinclined to leave what they view as their home country.

I wonder if similar observations could be made of extended New England and Midwestern families?

Blogger wreckage November 21, 2019 7:17 AM  

Historically, people put down roots and don't move for generations, over centuries. An economic system predicated on abnormal behaviour is not going to work. And in fact an economic system predicated on efficiency rather than production is also one built to fail.

Blogger CarpeOro November 21, 2019 7:17 AM  

Ha. Hahahahahaha. Funny as a heart attack. I moved twice before being married, twice times afterwards chasing employment. I also moved one other time, but that was back to my house that I retained through out being away from it for 13 years before selling it. My goal was getting home the entire time. What did that get me? Admittedly I could have stayed working at the first place to which I moved, but it never felt like home and I missed the trees, hills and lakes of home - corn and soybean stretching forever just didn't feel right. After all of that though, I was outsourced to India twice (the first place I contracted back into twice to pay my bills - the outsource workers couldn't handle the complexity of the work/environment). I would have been happier to have been a plumber or electrician, these days may even have made the same money.

I may be on the cusp of being a boomer, but my goal was always to get. Back. Home. Screw the mobility that destroyed my formerly industrial state - and the unions that created unsustainable deals with the manufacturers. The union leadership is as corrupt as it gets - which is why they work so well with politicians screwing the rest of us.

Blogger Skyler the Weird November 21, 2019 7:18 AM  

Move back up North Yankee.

Blogger Meanoldbasterd November 21, 2019 7:20 AM  

Out-fucking-standing!!

Blogger Stilicho November 21, 2019 7:22 AM  

This "rootedness" trend is threat to the globalists' efforts to atomize and destroy American families. I wonder how they will attack it? More disparagement from Pedowood? More tax incentives for those who move? Financial incentives for companies who move jobs?

Blogger VFM #7634 November 21, 2019 7:33 AM  

@14 Stilicho

Denying economic opportunities to younger small-town Americans, forcing them to move to a larger city, has been the favored method.

Although even there, many of these younger Americans would only stay in the larger city long enough for them to build up a work history and maybe find a spouse, then they want to "get. back. home." as CarpeOro says.

Blogger Zaklog the Great November 21, 2019 7:33 AM  

Breathes there the man, with soul so dead,
Who never to himself hath said,
This is my own, my native land!
Whose heart hath ne’er within him burn’d,
As home his footsteps he hath turn’d,
From wandering on a foreign strand!
If such there breathe, go, mark him well;
For him no Minstrel raptures swell;
High though his titles, proud his name,
Boundless his wealth as wish can claim;
Despite those titles, power, and pelf,
The wretch, concentred all in self,
Living, shall forfeit fair renown,
And, doubly dying, shall go down
To the vile dust, from whence he sprung,
Unwept, unhonour’d, and unsung.

by Sir Walter Scott

And apparently, the answer is yes. Those dead-souled men are our "leaders".

Blogger Cataline Sergius November 21, 2019 7:38 AM  

Stilicho wrote:This "rootedness" trend is threat to the globalists' efforts to atomize and destroy American families...

Absolutely correct.

One of the things this article isn't saying outright is people aren't moving to the cities.

And people moving to cities is vital for their system to work.

Classic example is my Boomer brother. Once he moved to NYC, the relationship with the pod of friends he developed became his primary familial relationship.

His friends became his new family.

But it was a fundamentally fragile relationship based on nothing more than proximity and mild affection. So he went to great pains to maintain it, adopting all of their consensus attitudes as his own.

Which of course were all Urban Liberal.

Blogger Steve Canyon November 21, 2019 7:45 AM  

Can't churn that real estate and get people to leverage up for bigger and more expensive houses if people stay put....

Blogger Cataline Sergius November 21, 2019 7:47 AM  

The real problem they have is that there are still plenty of people who are moving to the cities but the quality of these migrants is abysmal.

These are beggars trying to get as close to the royal balcony as possible in order to scoop up coins the monarch is throwing to the crowd.

Because it is fundamentally easier to live in utter poverty in the city than it is in the country.

But cities need parasitize the highly productive or they can't function.

Blogger Damelon Brinn November 21, 2019 7:50 AM  

This also won't please those who think white Americans should congregate in one region.

Blogger basementhomebrewer November 21, 2019 7:52 AM  

The rooted are disproportionately white, older, married, homeowners, and rural.

Clever how they got to single out those evil white families. Define blacks as "stuck" instead of rooted.

Blogger The Cooler November 21, 2019 7:53 AM  

If y'all ever wanted to know why you've been raised from the cradle to believe the South is an inbred backwater; why when you want to sound especially stupid you put on a drawl; why it's 'okay,' in current year, in essentially any and every social situation, to caricaturize and stereotype a Southerner; and, why all of these things are unendingly reinforced in pop culture, this is why: We are rooted.

Identity is bad for the Empire, unless it is the one or many superimposed by the Empire. The South is still getting the economic screws put to it, because we know who we are.

Blogger VD November 21, 2019 7:54 AM  

Once he moved to NYC, the relationship with the pod of friends he developed became his primary familial relationship. His friends became his new family.

Hence the evil of a seemingly innocuous show like Friends, which is primarily about the construction of an alternative pseudo-familial structure.

Blogger Mr.MantraMan November 21, 2019 7:58 AM  

Cities consume men as once said.

Blogger Mr.MantraMan November 21, 2019 8:00 AM  

Madison Grant

Blogger Haus frau November 21, 2019 8:03 AM  

The living standards of cities has dropped over the last few decades. Too expensive, too many vagrants, and far too much diversity. Also, the leftward swing in urban politics has caused many white people to move out to communities that suit them better, often back home. I think the upward trend in moving was largely driven by economic prosperity that dissipated a while ago. Creating and holding together a family while being rootless is expensive and stressful. Families need support networks and casual friends dont cut it.

Blogger YehudaL November 21, 2019 8:08 AM  

Hence the evil of a seemingly innocuous show like Friends, which is primarily about the construction of an alternative pseudo-familial structure.
Remember watching them as a kid thinking, my parents had me, fourth kid, when they were these bachelors' age. Thought that was the extent of the subversion. Only half right. Sigh.
Tangentially, how long before "rooted" becomes the new "based"?

Blogger stevo November 21, 2019 8:08 AM  

My observation in my own extended family: If your kids get graduate degrees they will end up living somewhere far from you...

Blogger Dan in Georgia November 21, 2019 8:11 AM  

I’ve been in Georgia for 30 years now. The middle 20 years in one house. I moved from New Jersey in my 20s because I didn’t see being able to buy a house on one income there. I was able to do that in Georgia. I’ve never considered moving back to Jersey.

Stay away northerners, it’s terrible here, you’d hate it. Rebel flags everywhere.

Blogger basementhomebrewer November 21, 2019 8:11 AM  

Classic example is my Boomer brother. Once he moved to NYC, the relationship with the pod of friends he developed became his primary familial relationship.

His friends became his new family.

But it was a fundamentally fragile relationship based on nothing more than proximity and mild affection. So he went to great pains to maintain it, adopting all of their consensus attitudes as his own.


Something they are missing in the study is that this is a big reason for the increase in rootedness as well in the younger generations. My boomer parents moved me 5 times before the age of 10 for job opportunities. 2 years is about the sweet spot of getting a good group of friends that you start to trust. As much as you would like to stay in touch, those friends fall away especially if you make multiple moves from when you were living near them.

I think most zoomers and millenials are tired of the negative parts of moving they experienced when they were young due to their boomer parent's moves.

A long distance friend/family member can offer advice or encouragement on the phone or online. A friend/family member that is close is there to help you work on your car, take on a home improvement project or go with you to visit your wife while she is in the hospital. There is no comparison really.

Blogger Doktor Jeep November 21, 2019 8:21 AM  

It was a boomeristic thing to "run" from.... everything really.... so there would be plenty of time and energy to spare for self indulgence and caring only about what's three feet in front of them. But now they just implant shitholers in the middle of nowhere and there really is no more escape-and-ignore anymore. I think "rooted" whites are already refugees from diversity taxes. And they are through running.

Blogger ThatWouldBeTelling November 21, 2019 8:23 AM  

Was just reading the latest posting by the Z Man (https://thezman.com/wordpress/?p=19098) and this sentence lept out to me; the context is "When the tide goes out you find out who’s naked" which he's applying to political groups instead of companies, such as the Democrats' Blue Dogs and neoconservatives, who failed when they were stressed enough. Now it's Conservatism Inc. in the face of the groypers.

"Not to be left out, David French chimed-in to remind everyone that he is the king of cucks. French is a guy who stepped over the poor and suffering in his own backyard so he could kidnap an Africa baby to tote around as a trophy to his perverted sense of righteousness."

It crystallized several new reasons these "trophies" are profoundly disturbing.

Blogger Ingemar November 21, 2019 8:25 AM  

On the geographic flip side, entire generations worth of economic hopes and dreams in India, China and Southeast Asia (Latin America?) have depended entirely on the ability to get a job in the States.

Blogger Balkan Yankee November 21, 2019 8:30 AM  

I've Been Moved.

Blogger RandyB November 21, 2019 8:31 AM  

And then there is the case when home is no longer home because of all those who moved in. Been there. I hope I have found a new home where I am.

Blogger bodenlose Schweinerei November 21, 2019 8:37 AM  

Declining mobility contributes to a host of economic and social issues

Another by-product of the financialization of everything: the brokers' monomaniacal obsession with churn. It doesn't matter if you're winning or losing, the key to keep spinning the wheel.

Their list of types seems to be missing a growing group of Americans: those who have been forced out of their homes and neighborhoods, either by gentrification or ghettoization. Guess those people doesn't really count in their "Movin' It Is Makin' It!" house of cards.

Blogger Damelon Brinn November 21, 2019 8:40 AM  

@17 Cataline, that's a great observation. In a real family, the bonds of blood are strong enough that you can disagree and fight but know you'll always be family. With an artificial family, a person has to change himself fundamentally--change his DNA, or at least his expression of it--to approach the same kind of bond, and even then it rarely works. There's a Prodigal Son, but no Prodigal Buddy From College.

Blogger Unknown November 21, 2019 8:52 AM  

They want us to be a nation of strangers without community.

Blogger Scuzzaman November 21, 2019 8:55 AM  

Red flag: reversal of cause and effect.

It’s a lot easier to move and stay in touch with money, and a hell of a lot harder without.

But probably just a coincidence that atm USA has highest income distribution imbalances in a century.

Blogger liberranter November 21, 2019 8:59 AM  

@8:

As in, "GO BACK TO WHERE YOU CAME FROM, ALIEN VIRUS!"

Blogger Azure Amaranthine November 21, 2019 9:02 AM  

"Their reasons for not moving are more psychological than economic: proximity to family and friends, and their involvement in the local community or church."

What measure is an ism? The moment it passes from service to God and fellow man to emerge as the object in itself, it becomes an idol. Isms divorced from righteous service ratify among false gods.

A man who praises capitalism and not God? In him, Capitalism. Is. Systematic. Greed.

And the capability or impetus-lacking who nonetheless still partake of the system will be slaves by any other name, dogs crushed at the bottom of the pile.

Blogger Damelon Brinn November 21, 2019 9:09 AM  

@39, It's easier and cheaper than ever to stay in touch over long distances, though. When Boomers or their ancestors moved across the country, they were accepting that they might not see their family for years, and would only get occasional calls and letters. Now even poor people have smart phones. So-called refugees have them, so they're never out of touch with home even if it's across the ocean. So I don't think inability to stay in touch is the reason. You may have a point on moving expenses, though.

Blogger Jake November 21, 2019 9:09 AM  

I did the reverse of what the evil, cold men who see man as "homo economicus" want us to do: I moved BACK to my hometown. It's been amazing. People know you. They care. They are not over-the-top ebullient, but they are always there. The quality of life per dollar is at least 5 times higher.
What is funny is that "rootedness" to these people is just a pseudo-causal explanation for why their homo economicus doesn't do what the computer models tell them he should.
The love of money really is at the root of evil... well, that's part of it.

Blogger Xellos November 21, 2019 9:14 AM  

"Why are young people not living like us?", said the boomers. "Could it be that we did something wrong? Nah, must be their fault."

Blogger Azure Amaranthine November 21, 2019 9:19 AM  

God, then kin, then facsimile nation and proven ally. Whatever scraps left after might be well economized by state or more alien entities.

Oh, good poetry Zaklog!

"Once he moved to NYC, the relationship with the pod of friends he developed became his primary familial relationship."

This is why they stigmatize the word kin as hillbilly language, and use "family" in all the feel-good entertainment. Your familia are whoever you have spent time with. No necessary blood connection.

"If y'all ever wanted to know why you've been raised from the cradle to believe the South is an inbred backwater..."

Just as you say.

Blogger Pathfinderlight November 21, 2019 9:20 AM  

It's amazing how people who hate and abuse us also want us to be at their beck and call. It's the most entitled thing I've ever heard of.

Blogger Harris November 21, 2019 9:26 AM  


I'd like to suggest that lower fertility rates also affect the overall mobility rate, i.e. be a contributing factor in the lower mobility rate. Younger workers are more likely to move than older established workers. But there are fewer younger workers today than in the past due to the choices to 1) have children later in life, and 2) have fewer children.

Admittedly, I don't have the resources to test this hypothesis, and don't have the time or inclination to do so. But it seems a reasonable hypothesis to me, and it would be interesting if someone compared the mobility rate among demographic groups by age from previous times to now.

There is already some support for this hypothesis in the report above, which indicates that older workers are more rooted than others. Just a thought.

Blogger Brett baker November 21, 2019 9:27 AM  

I like how the economic reasons have to do with the fact people realize moving to a higher income area won't necessarily improve your quality of life. Also, some "economists" are shocked at the idea that not everyone hates their family.

Blogger Azure Amaranthine November 21, 2019 9:30 AM  

"So I don't think inability to stay in touch is the reason."

More literally, hearing someone isn't touching them.

Blogger Duke Norfolk November 21, 2019 9:31 AM  

Indeed. The modern economy is the most efficient family shredder ever made. I'm sure it's all just a big (((coincidence))) though.

Blogger swiftfoxmark2 November 21, 2019 9:31 AM  

As much as I hate living in the DC area, my parents and brothers are close by. My boys love playing with their cousins.

And while I still can't afford a house, despite my income being six-figures, I'd rather rent here than move out to where I know nobody, I don't have a church community I'm familiar with, and have no family to meet up with.

Blogger Tars Tarkas November 21, 2019 9:35 AM  

People were also moving out of the cities and into the suburbs chased by blacks taking over the cities. That process has mostly ended and is more marginal now.

Blogger Jay Will November 21, 2019 9:37 AM  

I open my window where I live (university town) and I'm flooded with the wonderful array of accents and languages the world has to offer. It reminds me of a game my sister and I would play when going on holiday. We both pick colours and count all the cars with our colour passing by. Its unclear who is in the lead but there are far more Germans than I'd expect. A great wildcard pick.

What people don't seem to realize that, contrary to popular belief, is that what makes you weaker actually makes you stronger. Declawing, de-weaponizing, de-bonding are actually all really good for you. The more vulnerable, less independent you are, the better your life will be. Love your government it will keep you safe... we promise.

Blogger sammibandit November 21, 2019 9:45 AM  

If you've ever been really, really sick you learn fast that most "friends" will not stick by you. I've had the fortune of testing friends that way. I prefer to be around family.

There's now about 40 people in the whole country I'm related to--not many which isn't surprising since both sides came here in the 50s. In Berta people tend to move to where their ethnic relations moved. I live near a big Kulak/Galizien settlement. These are the people of my ancestors. Out East here are lots of Ukrainians which may also come from Halychnia/Galizien. It just makes sense.

I was reading that circa 1850 Western Euro marriage patterns were quite unique. People first married relatively late, around age 27. I've seen this pattern repeated in my parents and their parents and so on. Kids' ages can be really spread out. Based on that item alone, I don't think people change that much when making a cross-oceanic migration.

Bottom line: if I'm going to have a crappy, insecure job before being hausfrau I may as well do it near relatives and people from the Old Country.

Blogger Oswald November 21, 2019 9:45 AM  

I think this article misses some of the actual physical causes of a lower mobility rate.

For one, there was this move of people from rural to urban settings. This is not happening now.

Second, it use to be the average Joe moved to another city to find a manufacturing job. Now they would need to move to China or Mexico to find a manufacturing job.

Three, the process of moving is far more involved these days. People just have more stuff, and fewer family members to move it with. Plus, they always want you to sign a year or more lease. Or you own a house, and everyone knows how complex it is to sell and buy houses. The whole move thing is tougher. I think people get settled and unless the gangs take over the neighborhood or they can't afford to stay there, people just stay where they are.

Blogger Avalanche November 21, 2019 9:48 AM  

@19 "it is fundamentally easier to live in utter poverty in the city than it is in the country"

This is my answer to the civnats and idiots who suggest that -"if only" we stop the welfare, all the migrants will leave 'the country' {wink} and go back home:

"No, no they won't -- because living ROUGH UNDER A BRIDGE in America, is better than living in a hut in their third-world shitholes!"

Perplexed look and they wander off....

Blogger TheMaleRei November 21, 2019 9:50 AM  

Remember that Obama, even before he was President, and certainly during, supported something I'd never heard before: "Regionalism."
Which he supported purely for economic reasons, to get the taxes of the non-diverse populations back into the cities with all that wonderful vibrancy.
It sounded purely as a manner to get suburban taxes into the urban areas.
I have no doubt now that it would have eventually meant exporting the vibrancy and diversity into the suburbs.
And compelling people to move because of both crime and economic opportunity is an evil-genius way to cloak one's desire to make a population rootless - excepting those that cause the crime, of course. But the evil-genius' only use for the criminal underclass is as a weapon against populations they hate...

As an aside, I distinctly remember Sean Hannity and even Rush Limbaugh years ago chastising people who didn't want to move in order to find work. All that mattered to them was working and economic success, there was no thought of community or family or belonging to anything other than one's job.

Moving around a lot is not good for a person, especially a child whilst growing up. Mark Hamill is a Lefty Loon a great deal of the time. Yes, he spent a lot of time in Hollywood, but I think he also moved 12 times by the time he turned 18 years of age. Might that have had an effect, so desperate to belong that he turned to the Loony side when they recognized him as a fellow rootless?

Blogger Avalanche November 21, 2019 10:00 AM  

@50 "The modern economy is the most efficient family shredder ever made. I'm sure it's all just a big (((coincidence))) though."

Did you spell that wrong? I thought it was spelled (((cohencidence)))?

Blogger Calvin809 November 21, 2019 10:00 AM  

They will load up the rooted communities with "refugees" and migrants.

Blogger Gracie November 21, 2019 10:02 AM  

@9 "I wonder if similar observations could be made of extended New England and Midwestern families?"

I'd love to stay in the northeast. My husband is a Mayflower descendant. Our extended family is here and it feels like home. Oddly enough, we have a vacation home is Saranac Lake that my husband's family built 1976. We may ultimately end up moving there. But, our families have always been Republicans and living here is just becoming so difficult. We are fighting like crazy to keep our religious exemption here in CT and does not look good. I'm afraid we have to leave and I'm not sure how that is going to happen.

Blogger Chris '70 November 21, 2019 10:02 AM  

People value their connections to their community. We need a study to figure this out> Ain't science grand?

Blogger Ransom Smith November 21, 2019 10:04 AM  

I think most zoomers and millenials are tired of the negative parts of moving they experienced when they were young due to their boomer parent's moves.
The other benefits of being rooted is an established extended family to help with child care, home repairs, and other tasks.
Having a grandmother or aunt around to help with child care is at bare minimum, a 15k cost savings compared to a super cheap day care.

Blogger swiftfoxmark2 November 21, 2019 10:05 AM  

Avalanche wrote:@19 "it is fundamentally easier to live in utter poverty in the city than it is in the country"

This is my answer to the civnats and idiots who suggest that -"if only" we stop the welfare, all the migrants will leave 'the country' {wink} and go back home:

"No, no they won't -- because living ROUGH UNDER A BRIDGE in America, is better than living in a hut in their third-world shitholes!"

Perplexed look and they wander off....


We should still eliminate their welfare as well as most of the welfare for US citizens. I'd say that government welfare was also a huge contributing factor in people moving in the past. These days, most millenials don't believe they'll be collecting Social Security when they reach retirement age, so I imagine that is also a factor in them not moving away from their families.

Blogger Calvin809 November 21, 2019 10:05 AM  

My wife and I aren't moving because of family and this is where we grew up. Also the housing situation is insane and we don't want to deal with trying to find one again.

Blogger JonM November 21, 2019 10:19 AM  

"Declining mobility contributes to a host of economic and social issues:"

Followed by a list of exclusively economic issues.

Blogger freddie_mac November 21, 2019 10:26 AM  

@35 RandyB

And then there is the case when home is no longer home because of all those who moved in. Been there. I hope I have found a new home where I am.

Exactly. I started out in WA, moved to NYC/NJ for 20yrs, and then moved to the midwest a few years back. Never felt rooted on the east coast, but WA has turned into a foreign country. I'm working on integrating myself into the community here in the midwest and developing a network and support system.

Blogger Unknownsailor November 21, 2019 10:29 AM  

Calvin809 wrote:My wife and I aren't moving because of family and this is where we grew up. Also the housing situation is insane and we don't want to deal with trying to find one again.
This is where I am at. I know I got my house for a steal, and after moving every 3 years for the Navy I ain't moving nowhere any more.

Blogger ThatWouldBeTelling November 21, 2019 10:32 AM  

@61 Gracie:

"@9 "I wonder if similar observations could be made of extended New England and Midwestern families?"

I'd love to stay in the northeast.... But, our families have always been Republicans and living here is just becoming so difficult. We are fighting like crazy to keep our religious exemption here in CT and does not look good. I'm afraid we have to leave and I'm not sure how that is going to happen."

This has got to be an increasingly significant factor. For my STEM education and career I had no option but to move to Blue or what became Blue states. Today, if you're willing to have a very limited career in the Science and Math parts of STEM, or go in many if not most of the subfields of Technology and Engineering, you can have a career in Red states and regions where you aren't yet on the short list for extermination.

For some of these careers you don't even have to go to college. Or you can get a cheap nothingburger degree if the opportunity cost of mostly wasting four years is outweighed by the field effectively requiring one, in part because high school graduation hasn't had much signaling power for decades.

So a lot of us are sorting ourselves into states and regions that are at minimum politically tolerable, at least for now (this won't work forever, the Eye of Soros is on all of us in the US). And thus situated, less inclined to move.

Blogger Out of Nod November 21, 2019 10:36 AM  

Ok boomer

Blogger Out of Nod November 21, 2019 10:40 AM  

I recently did the same as well. The benefits are as you describe and it's definitely a quality of life improvement.

Blogger szook November 21, 2019 10:46 AM  

I graduated college in the mid-90's just prior to the internet boom. I set aside the idea of moving to a hotter location to move home and stay in the area to start a family of my own while staying in close proximity to my family (with the exception of a one year period in which I took an overseas work assignment). I have been fortunate to have steady employment, but regardless of that I have never regretted this decision. My kids have grown up in intimate relation to their grandparents and extended family.

Blogger James Dixon November 21, 2019 10:50 AM  

> Economists are upset that Americans aren't uprooting themselves from their communities as readily as the Baby Boomers and preceding generations did:

People have never wanted to move as much as they've had too, but up until the late 80's or so the economic advantages of doing so were so great people felt they didn't have any choice. Since the 90's that is no longer the case for your average employee.

We've been in our current house for 25 years now (with 5 jobs changes in that time), but we actually are in the process of moving farther south, for a number of reasons. But then I'm retired now and we can pick and choose exactly where we want to live.

Blogger Quilp November 21, 2019 10:50 AM  

"Having a grandmother or aunt around to help with child care is at bare minimum, a 15k cost savings compared to a super cheap day care."

I'm always amazed when I hear the true believers of the mobile economy disparage that. They then run out and trust their child's safety to complete strangers.

Blogger Glen Sprigg November 21, 2019 10:58 AM  

For myself, I grew up in a military family, so moving around was normal; I never developed 'roots' for any particular place. My wife, on the other hand has spent most of her life in this small town. We're both ready to move, though; she's very much the black sheep in her family, and feels no attachment to her relatives (which is why I married her; she's nothing like them).

I'm not sure where we will end up, but we've agreed that once we do move, that's it; we are staying put and raising the kids in that one spot.

Blogger Scuzzaman November 21, 2019 11:02 AM  

At Damelon;

Fair point. I was using “stay in touch” in a wider sense, including physical visits that are necessary to maintain emotional and spiritual connections over time, imo. I visit the (literal) other side of the world every 2 or 3 years - which is monstrous expensive - so my kids know where they cane from and I can be reminded. So we can all maintain that connection, however stretched, to family, friends, and place.

Blogger HouellebecqGurl November 21, 2019 11:33 AM  

My people have been in the US for approx 400 yrs, with about 225 yrs in N Carolina & Virginia, and the remainder in Alabama. For the most part, our ppl have stayed stuck throughout the state or have moved back & forth into Georgia.
We are Southerners, we like being Southerners, it's where we feel comfortable and even though my hubby & I could move to any state we wanted over the last several decades, we still live about an hour either way to both his family and mine.
I would bet Southerners would be some of the most 'stuck' people in their surveys because we grow up knowing how badly we get talked about by the rest of the country as one of the last acceptable punching bags.

Blogger HouellebecqGurl November 21, 2019 11:38 AM  

Amen, Cooler. Amen. I said something similar above.
We know who we are, we know how mocked & hated we are.

Blogger HouellebecqGurl November 21, 2019 11:40 AM  

Said the carpetbagger. Lol.
My hubby has underwear older than that.

Blogger Jack Amok November 21, 2019 11:46 AM  

If you live where you grew up, surrounded by people you grew up with, you have a pretty good idea who you can trust. Who's a good doctor, which mechanic won't rip you off, who you can trust around your children... If you move away to someplace you don't know the people you will be surrounded by, you need to rely on external sources to know who to trust. Credentials. Doctor Adams is Board-Certified. Bill's Auto Repair is endorsed by AAA. Superintendent Chambers has a Master's degree in Education from State. That sort of stuff.

Even fifty years ago, credentials weren't as good as local knowledge, but they were at least partially functional. Today? The credentialing system is utterly broken.

That's not the only, or even most important, factor. James Dixon covered the prosperity part: "People have never wanted to move as much as they've had too, but up until the late 80's or so the economic advantages of doing so were so great people felt they didn't have any choice. Since the 90's that is no longer the case for your average employee." And there's a breakdown in shared culture making moves harder too.

All of it is just true to form, the parasite infection has begun to kill the host that feeds it by causing the host's systems to break down.

Blogger Rhino Bear November 21, 2019 11:47 AM  

I am planning to get out of NYC in 18 months. The problem is that I can't figure out where to go. I can open a branch of our business anywhere, but finding a good high school for my son, a white area with a traditional catholic church, and a low cost of living has me going a bit crazy. I'm liking New Hampshire, but it does get pretty frigid up there. The south looks great as well, but the demographic shift is well on it's way.

Blogger Rhino Bear November 21, 2019 11:50 AM  

@76 I'm a new yorker and I love southerners. During my time in finance, I never met a southerner that wasn't based in reality. Great, Great people.

Blogger dienw November 21, 2019 11:57 AM  

@57
As an aside, I distinctly remember Sean Hannity and even Rush Limbaugh years ago chastising people who didn't want to move in order to find work. All that mattered to them was working and economic success, there was no thought of community or family or belonging to anything other than one's job.

Yes. This sort of thing combined with saying "retrain!" to the poor or newly laid-off factory worker turned me away from these two ans those like them.

Blogger camcleat November 21, 2019 12:04 PM  

The language of that piece is both shocking and very, very telling. To the above that said it is part of globalist destruction of the family, SPOT ON.

This is the literal opposite of Chesterton, et al's, Distributism and it's focus on family and local community.

I'm struggling to wrap my mind around how blatant that article was in its evil. Tis true that they are not even trying to hide it or be subtle anymore.

Blogger Haus frau November 21, 2019 12:06 PM  

@82 "Yes. This sort of thing combined with saying "retrain!" to the poor or newly laid-off factory worker turned me away from these two ans those like "

At least for Rush, it's relevant that he is a childless boomer on his 4th or 5th marriage. His life is the epitome of rootlessness.

Blogger camcleat November 21, 2019 12:11 PM  

The Cooler wrote:If y'all ever wanted to know why you've been raised from the cradle to believe the South is an inbred backwater; why when you want to sound especially stupid you put on a drawl; why it's 'okay,' in current year, in essentially any and every social situation, to caricaturize and stereotype a Southerner; and, why all of these things are unendingly reinforced in pop culture, this is why: We are rooted.

Identity is bad for the Empire, unless it is the one or many superimposed by the Empire. The South is still getting the economic screws put to it, because we know who we are.



Very, very well said.

Blogger dienw November 21, 2019 12:21 PM  

I think that the best way to be able to stay in the place you grew up in is to be in the trades; particularly in construction and the related trades. Starting a small business that is necessary for the area would also be good. Unfortunately, I have met people who will not teach their kids their trade.

At the same time one should extend the same opportunity to his local community by not hiring the illegal aliens and their spawn.

Blogger dienw November 21, 2019 12:27 PM  

@80
I am planning to get out of NYC in 18 months. The problem is that I can't figure out where to go.

I recommend staying within the original thirteen states or at least a safe distance east of the Mississippi River.

Blogger kurt9 November 21, 2019 12:40 PM  

Aside from everything else discussed in here, essentially any city bigger than about 200,000 people anywhere in the U.S. is socially like SoCal was in the 1980's. So there is no longer any reasons to move to either SoCal of the sunbelt for social reasons.

There is less economic reasons to go as well. Manufacturing is rebounding and it is more distributed geographically than it was in the 1970's. Silicon Valley no longer makes Silicon. Its largely social media these days. There is as much technology (real technology, not IT) in places like Pittsburgh than in Silicon Valley. Pittsburgh has lots of robotics, bio-engineering, nano-materials, and various other technologies, partly due to the presence of CMU. Most VFD development and manufacturing is in Wisconsin.

The sunbelt, which used to be my favorite place in the 1980's has changed. Anyone want to guess what that change might be? Needless to say, California is out for a variety of reasons.

So, yeah. Overall there is less reason to move even if you are a "rootless" cosmopolitan type.

Blogger Latigo3 November 21, 2019 12:41 PM  

This mobility was marketed throughout every part of the culture as a right of being American, without regard to family, church, etc. How many movies when I was growing up, started with someone moving? Karate Kid with Ralph Macchio started out this way, that's just one example. Several TV shows have people making the cast of characters their new family. Mobility, this was all the rage growing up. Was it a lateral move, a downward move, an upward move. Anyone remember the term "upward mobility". At the cost of what?

Blogger Lucky Lab November 21, 2019 12:48 PM  

We are leaving MA next month. We have qualms about leaving family and friends (wife grew up here). However, with housing in our town running at $600/sf to buy, and the commute being 75 minutes to go 8 miles, along with the terrible weather, we concluded that a warmer place is the way to go. Family will visit in the winter, and we’ll come back in the warmer months. We can be outdoors year round and have a nice home with a pool and spa for what rent costs here.

Blogger RedJack November 21, 2019 12:51 PM  

Just got back from my annual hunting trip home.

I live 6 hours away. Why don't we move back? We have been here for 16 years, and have built a support system. I am not interested in ripping it up. And my small down doesn't have employment for me.

Many of my boomer bosses mock me. Most of them are looking at retiring with no home to go back to. I have two.

Blogger RedJack November 21, 2019 12:58 PM  

Karhu,

You nailed it. I have an engineering degree, and have been living in red or redish purple areas for a long time. It has closed some doors. My boomer boss mentioned above kept telling me how much money I could make if i "Jettison some outdated behavior and move to Chicago!"

I don't want to live there. My best friend walked away from a $110K plus a year job (in an area you can live VERY WELL on that) to manage a gun store because he had enough.

My family who have chased the dollar have no home. No place that is their own. I have this little town in Iowa that I live in, and Nebraska (where I can travel 600 miles and find someone I grew up with!)

Blogger BriarRabbit November 21, 2019 1:00 PM  

I travelled extensively.. Europe to Micronesia.. from 1994 to 2011 when I returned to the Central/East Kentucky on which I grew up. I had a stint in the corporate world from 2004 to 2011 that showed me how unstable that life is. "You're fired!" ends your income.

There is no way to build something of lasting value moving every couple of years. Even the cash saved can be nationalized or devalued overnight. Since 2011, I've been doing what Big Bear started a year ago: a homestead. Fifteen acres, passive income streams, gardening, learning real skills.

The ability to break the ground with a horse and plow, distill spirits, build a barn, suture a wound, process a rabbit, marksmanship... none of that stuff can be taken from us.

I've never felt closer to God than when I am making something. I'm in an area that is 95% white, mostly Christian, and everyone is well-armed. No one blinks an eye when you open-carry. Except Wal-Mart, apparently, and phuk them.

If anyone is looking to relocate, Kentucky has inexpensive land, more running water than any state except Alaska, beautiful country, a booming economy (except the Eastern Kentucky counties, but if you have a location-independent means of income, you can live well and cheap), mostly white folks and plenty of guns and ammo. There isn't much that doesn't grow in our soil and hemp is opening up billions in revenue.

If I could start over, I'd still join the military, but I'd save 80% of my pay and return to Kentucky, start a business and never work for anyone. We get tricked into being shiftless vagrants.

Blogger Nathan Hornok November 21, 2019 1:04 PM  

Lower trust spread across the whole domestic Empire of the US, you're better off sticking around the people know. And the fact that legacy Americans are the first to see this and be "rooted" as the article put it, is great news. Let the Balkanization begin!

Blogger Laramie Hirsch November 21, 2019 1:08 PM  

Me and mine have thought about leaving our state often. We'd love to head west and settle in Arizona, perhaps Colorado, or even Idaho.

Two problems, though. Those places have received a horde of Californians who've driven up home prices beyond our ability, and those Californians vote ridiculously, guaranteeing the states will decay much as California did.

But also, it's taken us a full decade to build up a community of people within our parish and our town. We cannot abandon this community, as it helps sustain and grow our own family.

Running off to chase our fancies is not an option at this point.

Blogger Brick Hardslab November 21, 2019 1:22 PM  

Does it matter that we're not cogs in their machine?

They openly spew their bile at people living in rural areas. They hate us and want us gone, dead preferably.

How long before they act on their hate?

Blogger cecilhenry November 21, 2019 1:41 PM  

Genocide your entire race for the economy, goy!

These anti-Whites would literally render cultures, languages and races extinct for 2% more GDP growth.


What does a ((("stronger economy"))) matter if your people don't exist?


(This comment in any part and its entirety is banned from Twitter and google apps!!!!

They won't even allow the sentences!!!)

Blogger weka November 21, 2019 1:51 PM  

Well, they do have to go back...

I have friends who had to flee genocide (English South African). Their home is not here, and it hurts for them.

Blogger swiftfoxmark2 November 21, 2019 1:52 PM  

This article reminds of how people would use economics to tout the need for population control back in the 1960s and 1970s. If economists tell you something that contradicts morality, they are probably pushing a political agenda designed to make people work against the interests of God.

Anonymous Anonymous November 21, 2019 1:59 PM  

What are they talking about when they talk about the economy? I suspect their stocks on Wall St. They sell a pack of lies when they push moving and breezily retraining and “getting with the times” by shifting trades for “opportunity”; you restart from square one every time thus making it impossible to rise or obtain any relevant or influential rank in your industry (but I guess that’s good for keeping you at slave-level and keeping them rooted and in charge). NYC elites are among the most rooted out there, but they’d have the rest of the country traded about like their stocks.

As for tech innovation making you “still connected” if you live far apart that’s nonsense- I’m among the younger crowd and even then, the only real friendships are those in person. Contact becomes superficial and nonexistent as soon as people move (with the superficiality maintained via tech). Only the teetering-on-insane with severe social incompetence deluded themselves into thinking the strangers they Skype and tweet and twitch with or exchange superficial comments with on live streams are actual friends and family. Everything real that matters is still all face-to-face and in the flesh.

Blogger jaericho November 21, 2019 2:04 PM  

"If anyone is looking to relocate, Kentucky has inexpensive land..."

I drove thru western KY on a road trip to AL and it was gorgeous.

Blogger NateM November 21, 2019 2:12 PM  

Briar rabbit Good info, I grew up in Ohio and just finally got back to it. If I were to move from my hometown it'd be there. My current employer has a location in Covington, but it doesn't seem like you'd have to go too far afield to get away from it all anywhere in KY. Other than that I've decided nothing good happens for me west of the Mississippi. (God Bless Texas, but they've already got enough transplants)

Blogger Ominous Cowherd November 21, 2019 2:12 PM  

Ransom Smith wrote:The other benefits of being rooted is an established extended family to help with child care, home repairs, and other tasks.

Extended family interferes with indoctrination, subversion and perversion of the young.

Ransom Smith wrote:Having a grandmother or aunt around to help with child care is at bare minimum, a 15k cost savings compared to a super cheap day care.

Family childcare not only prevents the state from alienating your children, but it also reduces GDP by $15k/year/child.

Blogger Dangeresque November 21, 2019 2:22 PM  

"...the means, education, and capability to move to spaces of opportunity"

Ok, boomer.

The space of opportunity is always where I'm standing.

Blogger rumpole5 November 21, 2019 2:54 PM  

My "greatest" Gen Hoosier parents moved more than 15 times while I was growing up, including a 3 year stint in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida where they lived in 4 different houses and I attended 3 different elementary schools in that 3 years. No, we weren't fruit pickers, my parents were upper middle class. They just were always searching for something that they did not find. In contrast, in the last 40 years I have only moved 5 times. The last one probably doesn't count as a move because it was just getting rid of our house in town and downsized to a little beach shack that we were lucky enough to acquire 15 years ago.
The move from house to house was also something I saw in my aunts and uncles. That generation has been passing away over the last decade or so. My Dad passed in 2011 at age 87 (after moving into a new house at age 85) and my Mom in 2013. I wonder if this just isn't the passing of the restless WWII "greatest" Gen. They were remarkable people, but stability was not their forte'.

Blogger RonG November 21, 2019 2:54 PM  

Constantly moving is destructive of family and individual. I went to eleven different schools before university. You meet the bullies first. After a few moves you don't even bother to try to make friends. It becomes difficult to differentiate between negative and positive attention. Intellectually you know, but in the moment positive attention is responded to using the same script as when responding to the bullies. You never feel a part of any group because you are NOT part of any group.

Blogger Snidely Whiplash November 21, 2019 3:03 PM  

Another aspect is the ability to work from home. I moved out to the sticks 30 years ago, and that was with the knowledge I would have to drive 50-100 miles to get a decent job in my field. Today I work from home with co-workers in San Diego, Albuquerque, Kyiv, Czestochowa, Constanța, Valetta, (somewhere north of) Zaragoza, and Milton Keynes. I also have a co-worker who simply travels around. Last week he was in Mexico, this week in Chile.
Even 20 years ago this was not really possible. Now it's a real thing for ordinary people.

Blogger Macs November 21, 2019 3:26 PM  

I almost relocated to Maui a few times, but in the end I realized that family was more important. My extended family left the state when I was a small child and not having that support network allowed me to fall into Leftist nihilism for many years. I'm lucky just to be alive and I want to be there for the next generation.

Blogger Newscaper312 November 21, 2019 3:53 PM  

@52 Tars Tarkas

"People were also moving out of the cities and into the suburbs chased by blacks taking over the cities. That process has mostly ended and is more marginal now."

Bastards are working on it, following us w Section 8 renters and subsidized apartment complexes increasingly getting plopped down in nicer middle class areas (yet somehow never land where the moneyed enlightened live).

And Trump has not fully nuked Obamas "Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing" rules which very deliberately target these areas.

Blogger Daniel November 21, 2019 3:56 PM  

This. Friends is incredible harmful for young people.

Blogger Ominous Cowherd November 21, 2019 4:17 PM  

Newscaper312 wrote:And Trump has not fully nuked Obamas "Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing" rules which very deliberately target these areas.

None of us really know what Trump's actual goals are. It's entirely possible we would be less pleased with him if we did.

He's the best president in my life time, the best president in this century or the previous one. That's faint praise, because that sets the bar so low.

While we're on this presidential tangent, Q is posting again:
Chairman Graham, it's time.
Senate was the target.
Q

Blogger J Van Stry November 21, 2019 4:31 PM  

For all of the BS in California, I was willing to put up with it, until a couple of years ago. I had the money to move wherever I wanted to, but I was settled in California and all my friends were there.

Then they told me I had to surrender several of my legally bought firearms by a certain date, or go to jail.

Thirty days later I'd bought a house in Texas and was no longer a resident. And it was a smart move because the number of laws being passed that restrict and tax the middle class are growing very quickly there. Then of course there's the tax dollars I saved.

When a society stops taking care of and valuing the people who actually PAY the bills, it's time to leave.

Blogger Blaidd November 21, 2019 7:14 PM  

After finishing trade school, I tried to move. Applied to jobs in cities from coast to coast and got hardly any response. I exchanged emails with one manager that told me they wouldn't go forward with an interview because I didn't have any friends or family in the area and that company was in a neighboring state. Eventually found a job in my home state just two hours away. I occasionally think about moving to somewhere else where the summers aren't so humid, but I kinda like it here.

Blogger Ahărôwn November 21, 2019 7:14 PM  

Bottom line: if I'm going to have a crappy, insecure job before being hausfrau I may as well do it near relatives and people from the Old Country.

Indeed. After the Fort McMurray fire, lots of people who had already lost their jobs due to oil downturns moved back to other parts of Canada after they lost their house, too.

Blogger nswhorse November 21, 2019 7:23 PM  

Both sides of my family and both sides of my wife's family are scattered all over Australia and New Zealand. I also have an aunt and uncle in the States. Visiting my wife's parents is a full blown Christmas/New Year vacation. It always made me a bit sad how far away most of my extended family was, but it is only recently I've come to appreciate how truly dyscivilisational it is when the vast majority of families are split up this way. Surely some economist somewhere has thought to develop a theory of the economic advantages of family and community cohesion and and how they trade off against the advantages of labour mobility.

Blogger Attila is my bro November 21, 2019 7:45 PM  

Absolutely not. If you look at all these moving company statistics, almost all interstate moves are away from blue states to red states. NY is bleeding people while the Carolinas are growing, mostly people leaving the NE.

I live in a suburb of NYC. There are tons of Facebook groups for people leaving here and going south. "Only regret is not leaving sooner." It's mostly economics here. Income and property taxes are driving people away.

Blogger John Rockwell November 21, 2019 7:56 PM  

Not going to stop them. Nor from voting democrat.

Blogger Gulo Gulo November 21, 2019 7:58 PM  

Far northern New England is my home. We just broke ground on a new home 1/2 hr from where I was born and raised. Figured as things are beginning to unravel it made sense to be in an area that I know intimately and surrounded by solid salt of the earth people.

Blogger Gulo Gulo November 21, 2019 8:01 PM  

I wonder if similar observations could be made of extended New England and Midwestern families?

Yes..fathers side of the family came to Connecticut in 1643. Our roots run very deep here. Could never imagine leaving, no matter how many Jew Yawkers move in. My rational is this: when the fiat money spigot ends those locusts will flee..and fast.

Blogger John Rockwell November 21, 2019 8:14 PM  

Parasitic

Blogger Gulo Gulo November 21, 2019 8:15 PM  

This comment has been removed by the author.

Blogger John Rockwell November 21, 2019 8:21 PM  

Sure but combine that with a healthy justice system and lack of medical care. Being ruthless with them if criminal will work too.

Blogger John Rockwell November 21, 2019 8:24 PM  

And lifelong welfare should require sterilization

Blogger Gulo Gulo November 21, 2019 8:24 PM  

"I'm liking New Hampshire, but it does get pretty frigid up there"

The state needs solid Christian Nationalists. Its the last bastion of red in a sea of NE blue. Maine would be more red if it weren't for the union vote due to the pulp/paper industry.
The major advantage of the frigid climate here in NH..absolutely no diversity and mountainous topography eliminates efficient public transportation.

Blogger Gulo Gulo November 21, 2019 8:32 PM  

"You never feel a part of any group because you are NOT part of any group.'

Its why I'm a Sigma. Three different schools between 4th and 10th grade will do that to you.

Blogger sammibandit November 21, 2019 9:33 PM  

Indeed. After the Fort McMurray fire, lots of people who had already lost their jobs due to oil downturns moved back to other parts of Canada after they lost their house, too.

It's always nice to run into a neighbor on this blog. I'm kind of glad they did move away. They were never Albertan. And since they're not coming back they must be happier for it as well.

(Skip if you aren't interested a description of in the fire)
The Beast of 2015 was a really, really trying time in Berta. For those not familiar, our newly elected Socialist Internationale Premier was laughing it up, drunk as a skunk in plush, yuppie Banff while we had the largest evacuation in Alberta ever. Russia even offered to help but the proximity of the Fort to air base(s) made that a national security threat. Not that we weren't flattered, though. The Premier then hired blacks from South Africa to put out the fire... However, they weren't trained on how to deal with forest fire, and so they were trained.

Meanwhile lots of trained, private owner-operators of rescue outfits were grounded, unable to assist without the go-ahead from the Premier. As you can imagine, these rescue people were talking to each other on back channels about the charade. Some of their channels were banned on Facebook. After the fire these bright, young lads from SA reasonably complained about not being paid the minimum wage in Alberta in a successful effort to make the government follow the law.

Only one person died and it was in an evac situation on the road, not in the fire itself. Lots of people worked really hard to save livestock and convoy gas up and down Highway 63 to help people who ran out of fuel en route to Edmonton. Then the Red Cross kept lots of donations specifically given for helping people from Fort Mac. Just a comedy of errors.

(Resume if interested in people who didn't move during the fire)
One story that relates here is the ~80-year-old fellow who refused to evacuate. Afaik authorities were threatening to arrest him. We already knew in Albera that natural disasters are used as a pretext to remove legally owned guns from evacuated homes (see High River flooding, Slave Lake flooding for examples). For this chap not moving was helping himself and his neighbors.

As for the people who moved away I still wonder if that had anything to do with Fort Mac voting Progressive Conservative this past election.

Blogger ThatWouldBeTelling November 21, 2019 10:04 PM  

@126 sammibandit:

"Then the Red Cross kept lots of donations specifically given for helping people from Fort Mac."

The Canadian Red Cross does that as well as the American branch? Somehow I'm not surprised.

Blogger sammibandit November 21, 2019 10:29 PM  

No kidding eh?

Blogger Rabid Ratel November 22, 2019 9:07 AM  

Welsh Woodsman wrote:"You never feel a part of any group because you are NOT part of any group.'

Its why I'm a Sigma. Three different schools between 4th and 10th grade will do that to you.


Not a Sigma, but I agree with the moving causing problems, especially if you don't make friends easily. Two of my cousins have been living within 20km from me for a decade before we found each other again. Moving, especially moving regularly, is disaster for any family or extended family.

Blogger OneWingedShark November 22, 2019 9:33 AM  

basementhomebrewer wrote:I think most zoomers and millenials are tired of the negative parts of moving they experienced when they were young due to their boomer parent's moves.
More than this; thanks to the crash of 2008 and subsequent difficulties finding work — and, no, I don't believe this economy is The Best Ever, or even good — taught zoomers and millenials how unreliable jobs/the economy are.

I myself have had extended bouts of underemployment and unemployment, despite having a Computer Science degree and the so-called STEM-crisis, and have had one or two job-possibilities (not offers) that I had to turn down because I simply couldn't afford to move there because the unemployment/underemployment had depleted my savings and there was no guarantee that they wouldn't take advantage of the "probationary period" to leave me high and dry. — If that is my situation, and I avoid debt and prefer to save, how much worse is it for my peers?

Doktor Jeep wrote:But now they just implant shitholers in the middle of nowhere and there really is no more escape-and-ignore anymore. I think "rooted" whites are already refugees from diversity taxes. And they are through running.
This. / I've also noted a distinct shift in mentality: there are a LOT more people open to the idea of using the military on the invaders, rather than detain/deport.

Unknown wrote:They want us to be a nation of strangers without community.
That's why they want to destroy everything that gives a sense of community: from comicbooks to gun-clubs/militia to movies.

Xellos wrote:"Why are young people not living like us?", said the boomers. "Could it be that we did something wrong? Nah, must be their fault."
I've heard things similar to this.

Jake wrote:I did the reverse of what the evil, cold men who see man as "homo economicus" want us to do: I moved BACK to my hometown. It's been amazing. People know you. They care. They are not over-the-top ebullient, but they are always there. The quality of life per dollar is at least 5 times higher.
Indeed — I love my hometown, and if I had the money I'd build a fabrication-plant and make technical STEM jobs locally. Unfortunately, I don't have a cool $100 million in my pocket.

Blogger OneWingedShark November 22, 2019 10:17 AM  

Gracie wrote:We are fighting like crazy to keep our religious exemption here in CT and does not look good. I'm afraid we have to leave and I'm not sure how that is going to happen.
Lean into the curve: giving up "religious exemption" means also that the government can't threaten to remove it for "political activism"… which always seems to be only a certain kind of political activism.

Rhino Bear wrote:I am planning to get out of NYC in 18 months. The problem is that I can't figure out where to go.
I have family in Las Cruces, NM — perhaps not what you're looking for, but of the southern border-states NM is less alien-infested than most, and some think that's because it's one of the economically poorest. Given its history, I think you might have better luck finding your traditional Catholic there, provided you avoid Albuquerque and Santa Fe. — But the best advice I have for you is this: Pray about it. (I'll even pray for you, too.)

dienw wrote:Starting a small business that is necessary for the area would also be good.
I'd love to be able to do this; unfortunately, what I'd really like to do (a form of manufacturing) would cost millions for start-up: land, construction, fab-facilities… and then there's no guarantee that the product would catch on.

Unfortunately, I have met people who will not teach their kids their trade.
We call them Boomers.

At the same time one should extend the same opportunity to his local community by not hiring the illegal aliens and their spawn.
I have a family-friend who does roofing, he has a stellar reputation in the industry/community who refuses to hire illegals, the companies that do almost invariably produce bad-quality work.

Latigo3 wrote:Anyone remember the term "upward mobility". At the cost of what?
"Upward mobility" was never about physical location; it was about being able to better yourself/family/standard-of-living — moving from "lower middle class" to "upper middle class" — OR, in the context of employment/job, promotion.

But, of course this idea would be spun as intrinsically tied to the destruction of family/community in media.

Blogger Anthony November 22, 2019 12:24 PM  

As basementhomebrewer notes, black people are defined as "stuck", when they're actually pretty rooted. Because of the Great Migration, most black people have relatives in a bunch of big cities outside the South. When they move to a while new area, they're mostly moving near another relative. And with family help, they can move for less money than that survey thinks - even the poorest aren't that stuck.

For that matter, how many whites that move are moving near other family?

Blogger JamesB.BKK November 25, 2019 3:47 AM  

Look at the rootless cosmopolitans. They don't understand some people prefer staying near their homes. Doug Casey still needs to understand this instead of insulting such folks as modern day serfs. As for me, I got along much better with my family at minimum 1000 mile distances.

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