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Saturday, December 28, 2019

The costs of labor mobility

You won't see these social costs showing up in the GDP statistics. But they are very real costs all the same:
In decades past, it wasn’t uncommon at all for the average family to know each and every one of their neighbors living close by on the same street. Those dwelling on the same block would regularly gather for holiday parties in the winter, and barbecues during the summer. As the years have gone by, however, people have slowly become more inclined to keep to themselves and shy away from even greeting or speaking to their neighbors.

Now, a new survey of 2,000 British adults shows the staggering extent to which the concept of a neighborhood community has fallen by the wayside. In all, 75% say they consider their neighbors mere acquaintances at best. Sadly, nearly a quarter wouldn’t dream of knocking on one of their doors uninvited because there is “no sense of community spirit” in their neighborhood.

The survey, commissioned by Lottoland, also found that one in 10 modern adults mine as well be living next to an empty house as they only see their neighbors less than once per month. Still, four in 10 say they are at least “friendly” with a few of their neighbors, but still wouldn’t call them actual friends. The average survey respondent reports knowing the names of just five people living on their street.

Shockingly, one in 20 couldn’t name a single other person from his or her block.
Remember, this is the positive outcome for which the economists have been hoping. Maximizing output by moving all of the pieces around to their optimal production efficiency. Of course, it's a short-sighted approach, because the societal instability and lower quality of life it creates more than outweighs the short-term economic benefits.

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63 Comments:

Blogger Randomatos December 28, 2019 9:55 AM  

You have to wonder if the conformist isolation would be so common if the intergenerational relations were better. Would X'ers and millenials be so easy to ship around if the boomers hadn't day-cared, latch-keyed and divorce-for-not-happy'ed them? Did the breaking of bonds between the generations preceed the rise in labor mobility, or follow?

Blogger Jose Miguel December 28, 2019 9:59 AM  

It's why I want out of the corporate employment system. I've lived where I was friends with seven neighboring households till employment opportunities, or lack thereof moved everyone away. To live in a homestead with my brothers and cousins on it is the goal.

Blogger maniacprovost December 28, 2019 10:06 AM  

I am extremely dubious that anyone is Maximizing output by moving all of the pieces around to their optimal production efficiency

As far as I can tell, people randomly take jobs far from where they live because of extremely short term decisions based mostly on random fluctuations.

Unless you are a HIGHLY specialized expert, there is most likely no need to move to get a job. It's purely a result of needing a job *this week* rather than *next month*. The companies are to blame too because of their rigid cookie crusher hiring practices. If someone qualified who lives locally (and would therefore be loyal for life) shows up asking to work for below market rates... The response is, we're not hiring. Even if we have 90 job reqs going through HR paperwork hell. You only have 4 years experience? We'd rather wait another year to hire someone with 5.

Maybe I'm wrong.

Blogger tuberman December 28, 2019 10:10 AM  

"Randomatos wrote:You have to wonder if the conformist isolation would be so common if the intergenerational relations were better.

"Here come everyone," or the equality of everybody always leads to isolation, the destruction of cultures and civilization.

Although the "You can't trust anyone over 30," BS certainly was a watershed time.

Blogger pyrrhus December 28, 2019 10:20 AM  

And the "short term economic benefits" may well not even exist, since economic data is hopelessly compromised by numerous faulty assumptions...

Blogger Gettimothy December 28, 2019 10:22 AM  

I live in the country. I have 8 neighbors on my road and the mailman on weekdays and we all wave to each other and talk to each other from time to time. If I ask for help, its offered.

The strangest thing is how quickly news travels.

We are, largely, working class people. It still feels like America out here.

Blogger thalios December 28, 2019 10:23 AM  

My neighborhood is the epitome of this. Six years ago when we moved in it was surprisingly different, but trending towards what this article describes. Now white flight is in high gear in part because they're looking for that sense of community. As the whites leave, they're renting the places they leave behind mostly to Indians and Koreans. It's a cycle that will only be broken through drastic reforms or war.

Either way, they must go back.

Blogger The Lab Manager December 28, 2019 10:26 AM  

Don't tell this to the libertardians. All cultures are equal, don't you know. And it's always about shareholder value and not whether some of these intangibles like a stable community improve economic output.

Blogger RedJack December 28, 2019 10:27 AM  

Double edged sword.

My educational training is such that I could not find a job back home. I moved 400 miles away, and have lived in the same town for 15 years. Missed many opportunities to give my kids stability. Former coworkers have moved 5 times in 8 years, and mock me for being a tree. Their kids, however, still prefer to come back to my house in order to feel "home".

However, I could not have staid home either. Farming as a way of life is pretty much dead. My family corporation is hanging on, but it barely supports my cousin and my elderly aunt and uncle on land that used to support 5 homesteads. Trump's tariffs may kill that off.

I could have staid and worked low paying jobs. I may be able to move back. But tomorrow we go see some friends from Church that have become our kid's grandparents, and then I am going to help out another friend from church rebuild a shed.

Do I miss the farm? Every day. Every day I think back to that place that exists only in memories now. But that is not my family's home any more.

In short, I became an immigrant, not a nomad. I live in a land that was not my own, but have made a place for me.

Blogger RedJack December 28, 2019 10:32 AM  

maniacprovost

A lot has to do with HR.

Out of college, I worked at a plant a state away that made the same product that was being made in my home town. Why? HR did not want to hire "locals" because they would not move, and clog up the training track. So a guy from Chicago started at the plant, and left, while I moved across the region and never came back. Said plant is now complaining that they "Can't find people to live here!" and corp is asking to shut it down.

Blogger [Redacted] December 28, 2019 10:34 AM  

[Hatred for the Boomer Intensifies]

Blogger Rowan December 28, 2019 10:41 AM  

Everywhere I turn, though, are people hungering for community. They will not put two-and-two together. The mobility is deadly. Untethered people will latch on to alien cultures to find a sense of belonging, even if it is superficial. c.f. Desis moving into UMC neighborhoods full of European-descended mobile worker bees.

The European-descended residents hunger for culture and latch on to Desi culture in a desperate attempt to feel included in something, anything, that is unique and bonding. It is superficial and a Grade A, Level 11 virtue signal, but a symptom nonetheless of this type of cultural damage.

I’ve witnessed this firsthand. It is troubling.

Blogger J Van Stry December 28, 2019 10:48 AM  

Ever notice that most economists aren't rich?
Says a lot right there.

Blogger Damelon Brinn December 28, 2019 10:49 AM  

I am extremely dubious that anyone is Maximizing output by moving all of the pieces around to their optimal production efficiency

No, it doesn't actually work like they think. But that's what they expect, that the invisible hand of the market will move the most people to the most efficient positions for the most overall production. And they're willing to sacrifice pretty much everything for it, including family ties, culture, and entire towns.

The point that's worth making though, is: it's not bad because it doesn't work. It would still be bad if it did work and really produced the greatest possible amount of wealth. Other things have more value.

I've mentioned before that my town of 1000 recently got a dollar store, which is nice because people don't have to drive to a bigger town to get basic stuff anymore. But 30 years ago there was a local family-owned grocery store, and a local family-owned general store, hardware store, etc. Now there's this chain store which seems to be staffed entirely by heavyset women, most of them probably single mothers on government assistance so they can get by on minimum wage.

That's just part of the transformation their quest for "maximizing output" has wrought.

Blogger Azimus December 28, 2019 10:57 AM  

Cell phones, particularly smart phones, are far more to blame than H1B's and illegals. Community used to grow in the little spaces between tasks - the bus stop, the line at the grocery store, at your child's T-ball game, receptions after Christmas concerts, etc. Now all those spaces are filled by smart phones. I have noticed that, particularly among young people, now they whip out their glowing rectangular gods at critical family functions - weddings, Christmas gatherings, funerals. When I was 20 I used to play board games w/my cousin, sip a beer like I was a big shot, and chat about the world and the future. Now I see the young hiding in dark corners, fat and alone, faces illumined by a bluish glow, angry that you would ask them if they would join you in a game of Yahtzee.

I certainly have no love of hearing the tongues of south Asia and Central America uttered in the streets and stores of my home. But the bigger problem is sitting right here in my hand, right now.

Blogger Crew December 28, 2019 10:59 AM  

And the concept of labor mobility pretty quickly leads to the concept of voter mobility ...

Blogger Crew December 28, 2019 11:02 AM  

Trump's tariffs may kill that off.

From the sound of things the damage was already done and has little to do with Trump's tariffs. Why throw that little bit of anti-Trump bullshit in?

Blogger Jack Amok December 28, 2019 11:10 AM  

the societal instability and lower quality of life it creates more than outweighs the short-term economic benefits.

Societal instability is probably one of the goals. Many an empire has forcibly relocated people far from home to destroy any sense of community that might rebel against Imperium.

Also, not knowing the people in your community gives more power to the credentialists.

Blogger Johnny December 28, 2019 11:12 AM  

Big companies move their executive talent around as a matter of policy. Or so it would seem. Leave somebody in one place and eventually they will start representing that one place, not the company. I suspect the Roman Empire did the same thing with their regional governors.


Not that it matters in the Untied States. As the book Bowling Alone documents in detail, private association in the US is dead. It died off during the twentieth century. Dead and gone. And the reasons for its death are kind of obvious: easy mobility, mass communication and the efficiency of large scale enterprise.

Blogger Vaughan Williams December 28, 2019 11:37 AM  

The white flight continues in my neighborhood. An old Slavic bricklayer who cured himself of cancer using herbs from his garden and outlived his doctor, just sold his house. Another Desi family will be moving in. I don't see any whites trying to "join" Desi culture on a personal level, but Diwali fireworks have largely replaced Halloween fireworks.

Blogger Ransom Smith December 28, 2019 11:45 AM  

Cell phones, particularly smart phones, are far more to blame
No they're not.
Cell phones have been around since the 80s, and smart phones truthfully have been around since the late 90s.
The breakdown of community started before both those times, when people started moving in and out constantly for work, and saw their communities flooded with outsiders.

Blogger ar10308 December 28, 2019 11:56 AM  

Not surprising. This allows the National identity and culture to be more easily pushed via TV and movies. A demoralized society, is an easily controlled society.

People not knowing their neighbors can't mount an effective defense against invaders. The best form of national defense is neighbors knowing each other to be able to repel an invader.

Blogger RobertDWood December 28, 2019 12:10 PM  

I live in a north Texas suburb city with lower-middle-class range housing. Married, three kids under 5, wife stays home.

After some prompting from my church earlier this year we've been making efforts to move neighbors from 'those people's to 'conversational acquaintance' to 'friends'. Of the 6 homes surrounding us, 4 positive responses and reciprocation and 2 leave me alone(have high schoolers)/we are hermits by choice (renters).

I recommend everyone do this. Make your immediate community an
asset or at least understand your liabilities in a grid down environment. For the Christians, how can you love your neighbor without knowing your neighborhood?

Ancillary observation:
Children bring people together. Retirees recall good memories and enjoy the energy of the kids, young people with kids always have a conversation bridge with us, and childless people usually have a dog to talk about.

Blogger liberranter December 28, 2019 12:32 PM  

@1:

Yes, and that's another thing "they"/(((they))) are working hard to make sure no one notices. Although it's really too late to do anything to significantly reverse the problem now, inter-generational animosity has been deliberately fomented by the globalists for at least the last three quarters of a century as part of their plan to destroy both the family and the community and reduce the Deplorables to being nothing but mobile, disposable tools for the machine. It has been arguably the most successful of their goals to date and plays a major part in the root causes of the subject of the OP.

Blogger Damelon Brinn December 28, 2019 12:32 PM  

@17 Crew,

American farmers, probably more than anyone else, hear a constant drumbeat of Tariffs Bad from everything from industry magazines to purported farm organizations like Farm Bureau. And since farmers are a demographic that voted for Trump, the media happily provides a megaphone.

It's not entirely false. Since the 80s, US farm policy has pushed farmers to be dependent on exports. It's basically the Walmart strategy: sell cheap, expand, and make it up on volume. So now the farmers who expanded and did things the way the government and university experts said were the way of the future, feel stuck, like they can't survive without those foreign customers.

Of course, they're only being told half of the story, because tariffs work both ways, and Americans gotta eat too. We eat a *lot*, in fact.

Blogger TheMaleRei December 28, 2019 1:15 PM  

Constantly moving around is a trademark of the military family, at least in the USA.
Whether it's being assigned a new unit, being sent off to attend a school or qualification course, moving around a lot is something military families endure.
Ask someone who moved a half-dozen or more times by the time they were eighteen where home is, where family is, where community is, especially when they're moving across not just the country but overseas, and most will give an answer that's more of an ideal than anything else.

It's not hard to imagine that the powers that be look at the constant community disruption that takes place amongst career military families and think to themselves: "What if we do that to everyone. By Prometheus they'll be far easier to control!"

Blogger Azure Amaranthine December 28, 2019 1:16 PM  

*This is a baby.*
*This is a baby thrown out with the bathwater.*

This is a baby thrown in a blending machine.

"And the "short term economic benefits" may well not even exist"

Oh I'm sure it exists, if you go sufficiently short term with sufficiently cutthroat people. Look at all the golden parachutes. Formulaic business major retards though? Yeah, they're going to jack everyone up due to propaganda they've swallowed, all to no benefit.

"Out of college, I worked at a plant a state away that made the same product that was being made in my home town. Why? HR did not want to hire "locals" because they would not move, and clog up the training track."

That's a window on the issue. Every degree of immobility makes the worker a less desirable component to someone who wants to be able to manipulate the worker any which way in order to maximize profits to themselves.

"Societal instability is probably one of the goals. Many an empire has forcibly relocated people far from home to destroy any sense of community that might rebel against Imperium."

Ding ding ding!

"Also, not knowing the people in your community gives more power to the credentialists."

And to the info-media gatekeepers! Batting a thousand Jack.

"Yes, and that's another thing "they"/(((they))) are working hard to make sure no one notices.... ...inter-generational animosity has been deliberately fomented by the globalists"

"Now I am freed to bring all into ruin, by divorcing what should be united, adulterating what should be divided."

Blogger Jim the Curmudgeon December 28, 2019 1:20 PM  

Incredibly well timed post, as I was JUST talking with my wife about this very phenomenon today. Labor mobility has absolutely destroyed communities.

We currently live in one of the last white picket fence suburbs of a major US city with a heavy tech/software sector. At 43, I am old enough to recall growing up in a neighborhood that was actually a neighborhood - people knew each other to the point where every child's birthday had tens of guests from different families. These days, it's completely atomized.

Immigration is a large chunk of the problem. I recall living on one street surrounded by foreigners. The Taiwanese family refused to talk to the mainland Chinese, and both refused to talk to the Vietnamese. All of them watched our house being burglarized by men with a white van, but no one called the police. Compare that to my original street where that robbery would have been stopped instantly.

There's also internal mobility. People move for jobs, leaving them with no long term stake in an area. We are exemplars, in that we are probably moving on. We have no incentive to contribute to a community that we might only live in for a few years. We have absolutely no network here. A few friends, but no deep roots like family networks, university networks, masonic handshakes, etc.

Low reproductive output and a lack of community cohesion should be viewed as a major disadvantage for white people. Networks help you succeed. Indians and other groups maintain extremely large families that support each other, take care of each other's kids, collaborate on investments, etc. An Indian always has a relative in a given country ready to help out, and if not, a clan member or caste member connected by marriage. That's how they pool money and buy endless amounts of real estate.

Have 1 kid per family, and pretty soon you don't have a family tree anymore. Having no community where you live means that you don't have a backup network in your neighborhood.

Blogger RedJack December 28, 2019 1:34 PM  

It is the truth. Many farmers back home support Trump. However it ended the biggest outlet for their products. Damage was done well before Trump, but the trade war hurt ag a lot. Now much of that production has moved to South America, and it isn't coming back. Was possibly going that way anyway because of the increased input costs

Blogger HouellebecqGurl December 28, 2019 1:47 PM  

Lefty professor Robert Putnam published Bowling Alone 25 yrs ago. Good to see the media right on top of this in such a timely manner.

Blogger Balam December 28, 2019 2:15 PM  

@Jim the Curmudgeon
''Networks help you succeed. Indians and other groups maintain extremely large families that support each other, take care of each other's kids, collaborate on investments, etc. An Indian always has a relative in a given country ready to help out, and if not, a clan member or caste member connected by marriage. That's how they pool money and buy endless amounts of real estate.''

They call that 'white privilege' nowadays. The concentrated effort has been to destroy all centers of social cohesion for Americans, not mere coincidence as shown by the forced school bussing. Churches, homogenous neighborhoods, I mean you know. Of course it gets ignored when (((nepotism))) occurs elsewhere. The absolute lunacy to complain that mostly whites occupy spaces in a white country.

Things likes phones fill the gap left behind and aren't the primary drivers. Smart phone blaming is sort of like blaming video games for the lack of young dating nowadays; young men have a physical compulsion to be with good looking women and video games are a consolation prize if they can't accomplish that.

Blogger boogeyman December 28, 2019 2:15 PM  

I've spent almost my entire life living in poorer neighborhoods. It's generally a bad idea to get too chummy with the neighbors, since there is such a high likelihood of them being an addict/dealer or at the very least a generator of Worldstar type drama. Even if you luck out and avoid the worst type of ghetto neighbors and get to know the person next door, they will invariably end up asking for help and loans to the point that you become merely another resource they can call upon, and not a true friend.

Having your kids play with the neighbor kids in such environments is equally counter-productive. Any time the kids have a spat, the parents are almost guaranteed to get involved, blow it up even worse, and prolong it far beyond the time it should have been resolved and forgotten. I'm on disability, and have been forced to live in a low income apartment complex. In the warmer months there are loud group arguments at least once every 10 days, things that spill out into the common areas. Whenever they are not about this guy cheating on that girl or this person owes that money, it's about your kid hit mine or stole his toy/bike/video game. The mobs of onlookers and people cheering it on can get pretty large, and the whole thing can last an hour or more. We average a murder or accidental death a year, with several non-lethal shooting events.

Purposely not knowing your neighbors in below-middle class neighborhoods is a basic survival strategy.

Blogger RedJack December 28, 2019 2:36 PM  

As a quick follow up.

My last job was with a company owned by a famous Kansas billionaire. One of the core statements by the company was to limit the amount of time any person on the "rise" would spend in any department, plant/office, or area. The expressed reason was to make sure that other areas got to "experience a diversity of ideas". The honest reason to to limit the connection between management and the rest of the team. When you are there for a few years, you don't care about the community. The owner is a doctrinaire libertarian, and is pretty open about wanting mass immigration, and famous for deposing of people once their value to him is done. Even his own family.

One of the reasons I left was because I was expected to hope on the ladder and move every 24 months. I could leave my family (in fact that was expressly encouraged) behind, but "To provide value" the expectation was to hop on and be used up.

Blogger Ominous Cowherd December 28, 2019 3:22 PM  

TheMaleRei wrote:Constantly moving around is a trademark of the military family, at least in the USA.
Moving the military every two years prevents the military from developing competence in anything location specific. That's one reason the military has to contract out pretty much everything.
RedJack wrote:The honest reason to to limit the connection between management and the rest of the team. When you are there for a few years, you don't care about the community.
It's harder for the colonels to revolt if they have no connection to the regiment. Reassigning everyone every two years means nobody has the sort of long time connections that he could safely conspire with. It's the old divide and conquer thing that empires have done since the first one.
RedJack wrote:Now much of that production has moved to South America, and it isn't coming back.
Didn't 0bammy say that about jobs?

Blogger Kari Hall December 28, 2019 3:56 PM  

Just a thought, but what about Internet mobility? I have experienced a lack of connection with local friends and family because I will not use facebook and social media. Echoes of "It was on facebook" or "Did you see that on facebook?" go on for the first 30 mins of any conversation. In the many years I have been in the dissident right I have also experienced a feeling of being left behind or abandoned by content creators and online communities that form for a time, but never last due to their artificial nature and their lack of accountability to one another. Then there is the Gnostic nature of online associations, miss a post or stream and you may not be privy to some event or an ever evolving lexicon and you are behind for weeks. There is nothing that can replace real life connection and community.

Blogger Kiwi December 28, 2019 3:58 PM  

I have a ridiculously large family, which is why for the past 20 or so years I've lived relatively peacefully on a small island with my ocean moat protecting from constant waves of "urgent" interruption.

Unfortunately, this world situation has meant I've had to be on the mainland more, networking, planning, attending seemingly infinite family functions etc. In the back of my mind I know I'm ready to head home if needed, but for now I'll wait.

My neighbours here are good people so it's safe, it's kind of faux rural, a mix of posh and eccentrics or both. Now I actively initiate community, which I haven't been too fussed with in the past, but I've always known how important it is for overall community safety.

As mentioned above, people are hungry for it, like they somehow know it's time to rejoin. Of course not everyone knows how to do this and many grown adults in my neighbourhood have the knowledge of wee children from my hometown. Therefore, I treat them like children, lure them over by letting small cute farm animals free rang out front - they think they've escaped, bless, or grow giant veges, make fires, take them meat from a hunt, home grown wine, honey, mead, fresh picked and dried tea etc (none the norm here). Offer to teach/help them. It's a lot of work, and obviously not possible if Mum and Dad are both working. Biggest mistake IMO, sending women to work outside the home zone.

Blogger Azimus December 28, 2019 4:00 PM  

@21 @31

We can agree to disagree. Naturally of course, you are wrong, but you are free to think whatever you want. :)

To say that "cell phones" have been with us since the 90's is to not even get 10 words into my point. I said "Cell phones, particularly smart phones". Smart phones have been in broad use for about 10 years, and having lived and worked in Chicagoland before that I can tell you we had plenty of Mexicans before that. I'm sure you noticed this too.

I am not prepared to give any more than anecdotal evidence at this time, but I moved from a suburb of Chicago of 90,000 (predominantly Honduran/Mexican) back to the Wisconsin town of my birth of 5,000 (lily white), and the return to my small town was pleasant, specifically for these reasons of community cited here.

I remember being so pleased when a woman walking her dog would smile pleasantly and say something innocuous about the weather, instead of crossing the street a half a block before I reached her and recrossing a half a block after I passed her. The difference was palpable.

Now walking through my town, most people whip out their godforsaken smart phones and pretend to "be busy" when they pass you. In the queue at the grocery store they whip out their phones. When they take their toddlers to dinner at restaurants they ignore their beautiful children completely and worship the glowing rectangular god. At baseball games, parents don't even watch their kids play - too busy worshipping. At baptisms, Christmas recitals, funerals, banquets, you name it, adults are on their phones. And I am not confusing "taking pictures" with worshipping the glowing rectangular god - it is easy to see by the position of the hands and the blank, zombie-like look on their face what they are doing.

If you don't see this, then you are in an area strangely innoculated against this problem, and the best kept secret of the modern world. Smart phones are responsible for the atomization of culture. You can make the (fallacious, in my opinion) argument that they fill the void where community was, but even if that true THEY'VE FILLED THE VOID, there's no way for anything else to get in where community used to be.

I could go on. I've said enough. If you want to argue that Subhradeep Dutta of Edina, Minnesota is a bigger problem than the entire civilization being addicted to dopamine rushes from their little battery powered idols, I guess I will hear you out. But saying that smart phones/cell phones are not also a very destructive force on community is simply untrue.

Blogger VFM #7634 December 28, 2019 4:22 PM  

Now much of that production has moved to South America, and it isn't coming back.

Corn and soybeans are fungible. If China shifts to buying soybeans from Argentina and Brazil, Europe and other countries who used to buy from Argentina and Brazil will be forced to buy from us.

Blogger Ransom Smith December 28, 2019 4:47 PM  

Smart phones have been in broad use for about 10 years
Palm pilots came out in the late 90s and blackberry around that same time.
I knew more than one person in the mis 2000s, teenage like me, who had blackberries or something similar.
I barely knew anyone on my street in the 90s because they were from either out of town or had no kids my age. Societal disconnect started way earlier than 2007 when the iPhone first out.
But saying that smart phones/cell phones are not also a very destructive force on community is simply untrue.
Don't Boomer post this hard.

Blogger bramley December 28, 2019 5:28 PM  

Seeing as this report is about Britain, i may as well chime in with some anecdotalising:

I live in the capital. For several years i did not ever talk to my neighbours in a building that has only three flats in it. I can count at least six tenants who have lived in the other flats in the ten years that i have lived there. I have not ever been invited into any of their flats. I have not even spoken to nor seen some of these people during their stay in the building. I only recently, after about two years of being neighbours, made the acquaintance of the tenants of one of the other flats, and only in relation to mutual issues arising from the property. I have not even been to the homes of some of my friends of over fifteen years. And a lot of them haven't been to mine.

Contrast this to my mother who for a similar duration has resided in a small country town. She knows a lot of her neighbours, and they regularly chat with one another over the garden fence, or out and about in town, or on the bus. She knows the local gossip, and is kept up to speed on it all through the local 'grapevine'. She knows the names of the people who work in the shops and cafes in the high street, and they know her, and she can ask nearly any of them for help if she needs something. She even knows which house each of the neighbourhood cats belong to.

My neighbours have all been foreign excepting one (mostly Euros, some east Asians). My mum's neighbours are all British, and local to the area. The town she lives in is 99% white British (unofficial B.A.S. statistics there).

Growing up i knew a large number of people on my street in a mid-size town in southern England. Us kids were always out at each others houses after school, or mucking about in the park or playing on the street at weekends. We knew we were safe, the parents knew where we were, and we knew when somebody from outside the area was around. Now that street has been largely turned into transient student accommodation, the houses have been converted from family homes into money-making assets. There are still families there, but it's not at all the same kind of micro-community. That street was 99% white British in my time there (B.A.S. stats again).

This type of observation is wearyingly common all across the Occident. Sad. But i wanted to point out there are still pockets of normality away from the urbs. I hope they can survive for the future of our peoples and culture.

Blogger Long Live The West December 28, 2019 7:44 PM  

"Just a thought, but what about Internet mobility?"

I have the same issue come up for me. Never used facebook even though practically everyone in my life has it or had it and got rid of it.

If anyone ever is having trouble connecting with people my advice would be this. Be intentional about friendships. Don't just passively wait in the shadows for someone to put down their phone and intiate a conversation. Invite people to live life with you. Make your own memories instead of looking at pictures of what someone else is doing. Someone is mote interested than your phone than you? Move on.

Reject envy, and build those real life relationships that will mean more to you than a thousand facebook 'friends' ever could.

Blogger Crew December 28, 2019 7:47 PM  

@39: In Europe you can buy the (faggot)fair phone (at 450EU).

In the US you can purchase the PinePhone or the Librem-5.

Blogger Azure Amaranthine December 28, 2019 8:42 PM  

Having grown up directly through the nineties, I agree that the alienation was already well in swing by 1995 if not earlier. Phones don't destroy community, they just change its topology. Intentionally disrupting people and shuffling them around constantly? That destroys community.

Blogger Unknown December 28, 2019 8:57 PM  

It looks as though the second phase of the subversion process is solidified.

Blogger map December 28, 2019 9:09 PM  

Jim the Curmudgeon wrote:Low reproductive output and a lack of community cohesion should be viewed as a major disadvantage for white people. Networks help you succeed. Indians and other groups maintain extremely large families that support each other, take care of each other's kids, collaborate on investments, etc. An Indian always has a relative in a given country ready to help out, and if not, a clan member or caste member connected by marriage. That's how they pool money and buy endless amounts of real estate.

There is a lot less here than meets the eye.

Indians, like Asians and Hasidic Jews, and pretty much everyone non-White, qualify as minority disadvantaged businessmen, where they qualify for all kinds of government business subsidies.

The source of all of their entrepreneurship is the American taxpayer. It's another gift from Ronald Reagan.

Blogger map December 28, 2019 9:18 PM  

RedJack wrote:However, I could not have staid home either. Farming as a way of life is pretty much dead. My family corporation is hanging on, but it barely supports my cousin and my elderly aunt and uncle on land that used to support 5 homesteads. Trump's tariffs may kill that off.

I could have staid and worked low paying jobs. I may be able to move back. But tomorrow we go see some friends from Church that have become our kid's grandparents, and then I am going to help out another friend from church rebuild a shed.


I'm actually very curious about this.

Take this chart:

https://www.barchart.com/futures/quotes/ZSF20/technical-chart?plot=BAR&volume=contract&data=MN&density=X&pricesOn=1&asPctChange=0&logscale=0&sym=ZSF20&grid=1&height=500&studyheight=100

This is a chart of soybean prices over the last 20 years. They peaked in August of 2012 and have been declining ever since. Prices today for soybeans are about what they were from 2014 to 2016.

The point is that grain farming has had these precipitous declines for years before Trump came into office. How are farmers not surviving now when they were obviously surviving then?

Blogger RedJack December 28, 2019 10:38 PM  

Look at the input costs.

The "boom years" led to some very bad behavior. Farmers were being pushed to buy more and more land, bigger equipment, and sign worse contracts. in about 2012, my cousin signed a contract on some land that he could not make cash flow if the prices dropped. He was not alone. Bankers were pushing guys to take on more and more debt to get bigger equipment and more land, or they wouldn't finance the planting loans (the loan many use to buy seed and fertilizer). So the big guys ate up a bunch of little guys who couldn't afford the new loan covenants. Now they are getting eaten by Bayer, Cargil, and holding companies because they can't pay back the loans.

Big Green Tractors (John Deere) is laying people off because, well, no one can buy a $500k combine to harvest beans on land that you can't pay the note on.

Combine that with the market loss because of the tariffs, some bad weather (most of Nebraska had flood or blizzards during planting), and the collapse in the livestock market, and a lot of guys are in deep crap. Family that runs feed lots are doing some rather alarming things to keep feed coming. Enough so that my cousin is getting out before it all blows up.

Back home, Costco has a large chicken processing plant and contracting the local farmers to raise chickens. Notes of $1.5 to $2 million to build the facilities, locked in to sell only to Costco. Uncle offered to put me up for it, but after I ran the numbers a good year would not equal my salary now, and a bad year is so upside down that Costco would own the farm outright.

Fictionalization doesn't just effect retail.

Blogger Kiwi December 28, 2019 11:02 PM  

@37. Azimus

I imagine there was a similar reaction to books and letters.

Blogger Randomatos December 28, 2019 11:52 PM  

Move to the sticks. A one-room cabin in peace is better than the third floor in a stack of drama pods.

Blogger Magson December 29, 2019 2:21 AM  

There's a comedian named Sebastian Maniscalco who does a bit about how 20 years ago the doorbell ringing was awesome... and now if it happens, everyone hides instead. -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9hv0M4mnrE8

Blogger JamesB.BKK December 29, 2019 5:06 AM  

No. Supplantation via govt by progressives and progressives in disguise pretending to oppose the former.

Blogger JamesB.BKK December 29, 2019 5:08 AM  

Section 8 relocations using funds taken at gunpoint.

Blogger JamesB.BKK December 29, 2019 5:12 AM  

Headhunters are telling youngsters that if they don't change jobs / companies every 3-5 years or so they're screwing up. Youngsters believe them. Helps the churn and commission streams.

Blogger God Emperor Memes December 29, 2019 5:12 AM  

Will they? Or will Argentina and Brazil simply ramp up their production of those crops?

Blogger Attila is my bro December 29, 2019 9:35 AM  

My neighborhood is exactly as described here. I have attempted to be friendly and for the most part everyone is *acquaintance* friendly. I have only one neighbor that we regularly visit. Not to mention the fact that even though this is an almost 100% white homeowner neighborhood, everyone is a product of white flight. Nobody has roots - especially us as we're real "immigrants" here and not white flighters from the nearby vibrant megalopolis.

I recently turned 50 and it got me thinking. Many years ago at my grandmother's funeral in my small hometown, the line of people was literally around the block. If I died tomorrow would any of my neighbors save the one we're more than acquaintance friendly with show up for my funeral?

Blogger Akulkis December 29, 2019 9:41 AM  

@God Emperor Memes

Farmers don't sell to foreign purchasers. They sell to commodity traders on the futures market. Those same traders the go out and find buyers to take delivery. The American farmer doesn't have to do one single thing to change from selling his crops to Chinese to selling his crops to Europeans. All of that is done by the commodities traders.

Blogger the other boomer December 29, 2019 3:39 PM  

Agricultural production isn't coming back? If folks have enslaved themselves to the bank or costco, they may be stuck, but there's a big, growing demand for non-mass production food. For example, I can get milk for $2 and change at Aldi, but instead a I buy milk from a local farm/dairy that feeds their cows grass. Afew months ago it was about $3.85, and now it's $4.29. Haven't been there, but their farm is open for visitors, so in a sense it's part of the community, providing something people need and profiting from it. At the local, non-chain health food store, a place that does build community, there's even grass-fed, non-homogenized, non-pasteurized milk (sold of course only for feeding your pets!)from a family farm, with the farmer's name and some info about them, for about $10. Looks wonderful, and people (with lucky pets) must buy it or the price would have to come down.

Blogger eclecticme December 30, 2019 10:06 PM  

I read Ian Fletcher's book thanks to Vox.

There was a recent BBC piece on how Norwegian millennials are doing well. The piece was crap IMO. Link below.

Norway is not part of the EU and has high tariffs to protect some local industries.So how could that wealth exist? /sarcasm. The BBC piece does not mention that.

It does not touch on the Caucasian genetic stock. It does mention things getting worse with higher immigration in very tortured language that blames racism.

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/unlike-most-millennials-norway-s-are-rich?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Blogger map December 30, 2019 10:12 PM  

RedJack wrote:Look at the input costs.

The "boom years" led to some very bad behavior. Farmers were being pushed to buy more and more land, bigger equipment, and sign worse contracts. in about 2012, my cousin signed a contract on some land that he could not make cash flow if the prices dropped.


Well, they are not really "boom" years. That was the period of massive quantitative easing, which led to inflation and which then led to increases is commodities prices. This is when gold went from $350 and oz. to $1900 or so. When quantitative easing ended in late 2012, commodities prices started at a steep drop, and, I assume, there was a large drop in input costs along the way.

The point is, I don't see how conditions are now any different from 2013 when commodities prices then and now are largely trading in an overlapping range.

Blogger JamesB.BKK January 01, 2020 1:20 AM  

Turns out the boom is the bad part. The bust is the discovery and cleansing.

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Blogger Buddhist Logic January 19, 2020 9:29 AM  

I've been decrying this for decades. Five years ago I moved into a street of less than 20 houses, all owner-occupied. My family are the newest residents, some residents have been here for more than 40 years, most have been here for a generation. There is no community whatsoever. Weeks after we moved in (and surprised that no-one had introduced themselves) I went round knocking on doors. Most didn't even answer the door. Of the two who did, I later found out that I was the only neighbour who had been inside their homes in years.

Thinking that my problem was I lived on the edge of London and it was "the London effect" I recently discussed this with friends who live in a very salubrious suburb of Manchester. Both of my elderly friends are involved in lots of social/community organisations. But despite living in their home for 25 years they told me they did not have any contact with any of their neighbours. These elderly friends (one Labour, the other Conservative) think there's nothing wrong with there being no community!

My mother has lived in the same terraced house for nearly 60 years. She says she now doesn't know any of the neighbours. My partner's mother has lived in a detached house in a very posh, small town for over 20 years. She's always gone on about how friendly her neighbours are (although I thought she was deluded). She recently fell ill and became immobile, and as I expected she got no help or attention from these "friendly neighbours".

The elite have succeeded. They have destroyed all community in Britain. They can now import the replacement population (a population who have spent decades preying on the indigenous population) at increasing speeds. http://www.pmclauth.com/grooming-gang-statistics/gangs-jailed

The local councils around the country are corrupt from top to bottom. The replacement community has money thrown at them that was never provided to the native Brits (I've checked the accounts of mosques which formerly were community centres - their income went up fourfold once they were dedicated to the replacement population).

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