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Monday, April 27, 2020

This is why you don't give up

The fact that some are handed every chance at success doesn't mean they will find it. Just as the fact that some are ignored and given no chance to succeed doesn't mean they won't.


A seven-year-old direct message to a recruiting analyst from the 2019 Heisman Trophy Winner, 2020 NCAA National Champion, and first pick in the NFL draft, who was not only overlooked as a high school player, but had to transfer colleges in order to get the chance to start.

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55 Comments:

Blogger The Greay Man April 27, 2020 1:26 PM  

Inspiring.

Blogger Dos Voltz April 27, 2020 1:41 PM  

Nice catch.

Tom Brady didn't go early in the draft, in fact, in his pre-draft video he looks like an out-of-shape, depressed sad sack.

Years ago I read about a young female athlete who used that particular video as personal inspiration. Heck, Tom Brady once didn't even believe in himself, but eventually hard work and fate meet up. (Luck defined as that moment where preparation meets opportunity).

Blogger Argus Bacchus April 27, 2020 1:54 PM  

The Democrats need to find someone quickly to break the news to Joe Biden that it wasn't him, but rather a different Joe B, who was the first pick in this year's NFL Draft.

Blogger Hammerli 280 April 27, 2020 2:14 PM  

There's a power to tenacity that pure talent cannot match. Often, the mule-stubborn player comes out ahead of the guy with nothing but talent.

Blogger Cinco April 27, 2020 2:18 PM  

That’s some dedication, to have that kind of drive in life, he could have been anything.

Blogger sammibandit April 27, 2020 2:46 PM  

I read a meme the other day about a guy who worked 8 years to be hired as an engineer by Lego. I should have saved it. He made a gorgeous train set just from Lego.

Tenacity is so underrated until these kinds of stories come out. Then people are like "how did they do it".

Blogger KPKinSunnyPhiladelphia April 27, 2020 2:48 PM  

Joe Burrow's career arc is very odd in a way. He was a highly touted High School recruit, who made a big mistake going to Ohio State, where Urban Meyer's ideal quarter was a chunky black kid who do a really good job in the R part of an RPO offense.

But he was an Ohio/Big 10 kid, so off he went to Columbus. Had he grown up in California, he might have had a shot at one of the bigger west coast schools that do more standard QB play, but probably wouldn't have had an opportunity to win a National Championship.

Burrow owes half of his future NFL earnings -- which will be considerable given his talent -- to Ed Ogeron and Steven Ensminger, who put him a situation where his natural mental processing ability had a chance to flourish. He is going to kick ass in the NFL.

To me, English Premier League player Jamie Vardy is the greatest "come out of nowhere" athlete story in recent history.

Cut loose from youth program at Sheffield United at 16, he went right to the dregs of English soccer, a level 8 team, and spent 5 years slowly and methodically climbing the ranks, scoring bunches of goals on every team he played for, until he would up at Leicester, which eventually was promoted to the EPL and, even more miraculously, somehow, beyond all odds, won the EPL and has remained in the league since.

Leicester would not have won the EPL without Jamie Vardy.

It's just absolutely astonishing. From a youth soccer cast off, to EPL star, to getting caps on one of the world's top national team sides.

No one would believe it if it hadn't happened.

Blogger nightskyradio April 27, 2020 3:04 PM  

Thank you, Vox. Today of all days, I really need to see that.

Blogger John (not the pope) April 27, 2020 3:28 PM  

Which of the sisters...Abby or Ann...Lord give me the strength & tenacity of a weed.

Blogger glueballs April 27, 2020 3:34 PM  

I have jumped off a lot of stuff at fatal distances thanks to earth’s gravity thousands of times. The late Roger Nelson, my skydive parachuting mentor, listed eight substantive rules for surviving the sport.

Then there was catch-all Rule Number Nine: No Matter What Happens, Never Ever Give Up! For several decades my office desks have displayed a brass set-on-stone placard prominently featuring “RULE #9.”

You don’t need to go full-Biblical, just don’t quit. A retreat doesn’t need to be a surrender, just regroup and counterattack. For your posterity and good name.

Blogger VD Bear April 27, 2020 4:13 PM  

10 comments in and the “who cares about sports ball?” Gamma isn’t here yet. I’m disappointed.

Blogger Snidely Whiplash April 27, 2020 4:17 PM  

VD Bear wrote:10 comments in and the “who cares about sports ball?” Gamma isn’t here yet. I’m disappointed.
One thing moderation buys you is the ability spam that guy until he starts bleeding.

Blogger Daniel April 27, 2020 4:48 PM  

Moderators: keeping the Secret King a Secret since 2015.

Blogger Beau April 27, 2020 5:09 PM  

After my first two years as a pastor I found myself, my wife, and my three daughters sitting on a curb at midnight at LAX wondering if we had made a tremendous mistake. It felt as if we had been flung out of Hawaii as a consequence of straightening out problems in a small deeply dysfunctional congregation.

But we committed to the next step, and the rest by God's grace has been glorious history, our lives well spent for our Master. He's never left us or forsaken us. Neither will he forsake you.

Blogger Merry Tookman April 27, 2020 5:39 PM  

Great story, and I know firsthand that it's true. I watched him make his first high school varsity play (he didn't start that game or the next several) at our high school in 2012, and my jaw literally dropped at his acceleration and agility as he got most of the way downfield from his own 35. "He runs like a whippet!" I said to my older son, who had played two years earlier. (We had whippets at the time, which are like 2/3 size greyhounds and have the same unbelievable acceleration.) I watched this 14-year-old sophomore--a year younger than his classmates--eventually quarterback that team to a state championship in late December, a few weeks after he finally turned 15. And then I got to see almost every game in person as I watched this team and this kid do it again the next two years.

And here's more--he had been playing in rival school his freshman year, but the head coach there told him he'd never start...since the head coach's son was going to have that position. So, with that first roadblock, when that first someone said, “You can’t,” he ended up in our school where they let him have a shot at QB, even though we already had a good one with playoff experience, who was already a state champion wrestler. This QB that he eventually replaced happily switched to backup QB as well as starting wide receiver and sometimes outside linebacker--a small but versatile athlete that could make an alligator-roll tackle you wouldn't believe.

I was teaching an advanced high school class there during all three years he was QB, and three state championships in a row, with undefeated 16-game seasons--an amazing accomplishment in a huge football state like Texas… even though a lot of those playoff games we won by the skin of our teeth. Yet again, there's that never-give-up attitude; we were down three TDs going into 4th quarter in one playoff, and you could see him telling the team "It's not over yet!" The opponent's coach said afterward that when he saw that, he started to worry... and we ended up winning in the last seconds of the game.

He was ALWAYS quick to give full credit, in detail, to the rest of the team. His senior year, one of my little freshman students said something in class like, "Wow, he's got such a big head!" after he'd seen a post-game TV interview. Knowing so many of the football kids through my sons (my younger one was in his class) and my former students, I told him I had never yet seen a hint of it and not to be so quick to decide when you don't really know him. What's really funny, I just realized today, is this same freshman kid ended up being one of his rookie receivers at OU several years later.

That never-give-up attitude was lovingly drilled into the kids in that program, at least in 2010-2015 when my boys played. My math-genius older son was a very small outside linebacker, especially for the top-size (6A) division in Texas, but his coaches told me they and the other players absolutely loved my kid because he gave 100 percent even on every drill in practice and never complained. Even though he never started, he still says he loved the brotherhood of that team.

And yes, our Heisman Trophy winner was also "too small"--he really is no more than 5' 10". I've high fived him and the rest of the team over 40 times as every one of them lined up and walked by the stands to high five their fans on their way off the field--a tradition after every game, win or lose. So that height is yet another hurdle he didn't let stop him, even with EVERYBODY saying he wasn't big enough to be a college QB, after saying he wasn't "really" big enough to be a Texas Division-6A QB. And for those who don't know, this guy has some serious academic skills as well. If football doesn't work out, he has plenty of other options--besides baseball.

Blogger Kraemer April 27, 2020 6:01 PM  

Hahahahahaha this is the funniest thing I've read all day

Blogger MichaelJMaier April 27, 2020 6:15 PM  

VD Bear wrote:10 comments in and the “who cares about sports ball?” Gamma isn’t here yet. I’m disappointed.

Isn't that a banning offense?

Blogger Ransom Smith April 27, 2020 6:38 PM  

To me, English Premier League player Jamie Vardy is the greatest "come out of nowhere" athlete story in recent history.
Jay DeMerit went from playing in a pub league to starting for the US at the World Cup.

Blogger Ahărôwn April 27, 2020 6:46 PM  

Thanks for sharing this, Vox.

Blogger VD April 27, 2020 7:44 PM  

10 comments in and the “who cares about sports ball?” Gamma isn’t here yet. I’m disappointed.

There is no need for him if you're going to do his work for him. Don't.

Blogger VD Bear April 27, 2020 7:52 PM  

No, it’s sincere disappointed. As soon as I read the post I gleefully scrolled down to the comments, eager to find the gammas that couldn’t help but tell everyone they don’t sports ball. You know those tests of physical ability that alphas, bravos, and delta assemble teams to combat each other While women watch and cheer then on? It’s like cat nip for gammas. Sadly there were none to be had here. Maybe they were busy squirting. Maybe off swarming another blog. Who knows.

Blogger Monotonous Languor April 27, 2020 7:56 PM  

Statistics, statistics...

Blogger Emmett Fitz-Hume April 27, 2020 8:27 PM  

These are some of my favorite posts. I'm an optimism guy. I also like any post where Beau shows up.

Good to see you Beau!

Blogger Submitted2Christ April 27, 2020 8:33 PM  

Thank you for sharing

Blogger Quadko April 27, 2020 8:42 PM  

Where there is life, there is hope.

But one favorite memory from books was ERB, Tarzan, I think. Locked in a dungeon, awaiting execution, things look bad.
His line was, "I yet live."

I still recall it decades later. And the amazing power of authors and fiction to teach real character.

What we read is important.

Blogger SemiSpook37 April 27, 2020 8:52 PM  

That just makes me like this guy even more, even if he’s playing for the Bungles.

Blogger Ariadne Umbrella April 27, 2020 9:14 PM  

Thank you, Mr Tookman. A high school football championship is an amazing event for any school, for everyone.

Blogger Doktor Jeep April 27, 2020 9:46 PM  

I always tell the younger fellows that everybody I know who wanted something and kept to it eventually got to it.
It's like when you tell someone whose around 20 give or take that it took 15 years to restore a car, finding time for it even if it was just a little here and there. To a 20 year old 15 years is nearly an entire lifetime and seems like forever. Persistence will beat forever. And that's why evil fails eventually.

Blogger flyingtiger April 27, 2020 9:54 PM  

Fighter Ace Doug Bader was always my inspiration for never giving up. Lose two legs, you can still fly and fight.

Blogger #issues April 27, 2020 10:12 PM  

@ Merry Tookman
Who are you talking about? Joe Burrow is from Ohio.

Blogger Homesteader April 27, 2020 10:27 PM  

The Quitter, By Robert Louis Service

When you're lost in the Wild, and you're scared as a child, 
And Death looks you bang in the eye, 
And you're sore as a boil, it's according to Hoyle 
To cock your revolver and . . . die. 
But the Code of a Man says: "Fight all you can," 
And self-dissolution is barred. 
In hunger and woe, oh, it's easy to blow . . . 
It's the hell-served-for-breakfast that's hard. 

"You're sick of the game!" Well, now, that's a shame. 
You're young and you're brave and you're bright. 
"You've had a raw deal!" I know -- but don't squeal, 
Buck up, do your damnedest, and fight. 
It's the plugging away that will win you the day, 
So don't be a piker, old pard! 
Just draw on your grit; it's so easy to quit: 
It's the keeping-your-chin-up that's hard. 

It's easy to cry that you're beaten -- and die; 
It's easy to crawfish and crawl; 
But to fight and to fight when hope's out of sight -- 
Why, that's the best game of them all! 
And though you come out of each gruelling bout, 
All broken and beaten and scarred, 
Just have one more try -- it's dead easy to die, 
It's the keeping-on-living that's hard.
_________________________________

Quitting is either a damning of your judgement (for starting a poorly-conceived enterprise), or of your character (for giving up on a worthwhile pursuit).

If it's worthwhile, go the last mile.


Blogger Silly but True April 27, 2020 11:52 PM  

Some have natural talent and some have to work very hard. UNC assistant coach Roy Williams said in one of their first discussions that his new freshman, Michael Jordan told him he wanted to be the best basketball player to ever play at UNC.

Jordan, known only until then for not making his high school varsity team until his junior year, and his best praise received as a basketball player was to think about playing baseball responded that: 'I'm going to show you. Nobody will ever work as hard as I work.”

Jordan worked very hard.

Blogger furor kek tonicus ( no need to be racist, Ratchets can Karen better than anybody ) April 27, 2020 11:59 PM  

21. VD Bear April 27, 2020 7:52 PM
No, it’s sincere disappointed.


the train is fine.


29. flyingtiger April 27, 2020 9:54 PM
Fighter Ace Doug Bader was always my inspiration for never giving up. Lose two legs, you can still fly and fight.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabur%C5%8D_Sakai#Serious_wounds

Blogger GP April 28, 2020 12:00 AM  

Many of life's failures are those who didn't know how close to success they were when they quit....Thomas Jefferson

Blogger Shane Bradman April 28, 2020 12:42 AM  

I like the game, but I don't understand the draft process at all. It must be really demoralising for the young talents that worked so incredibly hard and got glossed over for some mediocre player who only succeeds against other mediocre players. Good on Joe Burrow for the hard work and insane dedication.

Blogger God Emperor Memes April 28, 2020 4:02 AM  

Jim Rohn had a great line that went something like: "Find something you can do...and do it."

Blogger God Emperor Memes April 28, 2020 4:11 AM  

To the point where you're in Colditz and the guards confiscate your tin legs to stop you from escaping.

Blogger jeffinjapan April 28, 2020 5:37 AM  

While the NFL is doing everything it can to dumb down the QB position with it’s shift to RPO centric offenses, (hence the rise of the Negro QB), QBs like Burrow, with a high IQ and an ability to read and process the defenses in front of him, will always be the preferred QB.

Blogger VD April 28, 2020 6:40 AM  

I don't understand the draft process at all.

The NFL drafts on potential, not past performance. The ability to succeed against lesser competition is not always indicative of the ability to succeed in the pros. See: Archie Griffin and most Heisman Trophy winners of the last 30 years.

Blogger VD April 28, 2020 6:42 AM  

No, it’s sincere disappointed.

You're missing the point. Don't do their work for them.

Blogger Robert Browning April 28, 2020 6:44 AM  

The whole idea of kids sports is to teach children not to give up, that you can be far back but if you keep trying you can come back and win.

Blogger Homesteader April 28, 2020 9:11 AM  

A high school wrestler I know lost to the same kid, 3 times during the season.

During the last tournament of the 2019 season, for his last match, he drew his Nemesis.

3 losses, no wins, last match, season ending. A lot of guys would have said, "Why bother".

The match begins, and, sure enough- his opponent starts racking points.

But, my young friend keeps battling- he's going to make the kid have to earn it, again..

Which is when Nemesis faltered..

And our protagonist, with lightning speed, flipped him and got the pin.

He took 3rd place in that tournament, but, in his mind and mine, he'd won his own personal championship that day.

He now wants to go SOF when he graduates.

Lord Wellington had a point.



Blogger KPKinSunnyPhiladelphia April 28, 2020 10:32 AM  

Ransom Smith wrote:To me, English Premier League player Jamie Vardy is the greatest "come out of nowhere" athlete story in recent history.

Jay DeMerit went from playing in a pub league to starting for the US at the World Cup.


Yep, another good example of never quitting and being determined.

IIRC, didn't DeMerit have a shot of playing in MLS after college? My memory is foggy. Going to England and starting at the bottom took some stones, that's for sure.

Blogger KPKinSunnyPhiladelphia April 28, 2020 10:51 AM  

Shane Bradman wrote:It must be really demoralising for the young talents that worked so incredibly hard and got glossed over for some mediocre player who only succeeds against other mediocre players.

Professional sports is absolutely Darwinian. Stars get all the attention -- if you're immensely talented, and don't fuck up, things will go just fine.

But for guys at the margin, the kid who was the best school player, one of best players if not the best player on his college team, but at the top level is no better than a dozen other guys, and maybe slightly worse, every practice, every game, every season is a struggle to survive.

Look over your shoulder and there's a NEWER guy, a few years younger, with a bit more promise, coming around the bend. And the older better/great players who are in front of you..they aren't going anywhere, for at least a while.

And even if you are highly skilled and talented, what if you wind up in the wrong situation? Who knows what would have happened to Joe Burrow had he not finished his career at LSU? Determination is essential, but luck/fortune, whatever, can play a role, positive or negative.

So what are you, middling/marginal professional player, when all is said and done?

You are a fungible asset to coaches and executives, many of whom are one mistake from getting their asses fired. You will be hired, then consumed, depreciated, and eventually discarded, like a tool and die machine that has moved beyond its useful life.

Blogger AbnEng April 28, 2020 10:56 AM  

"27. Ariadne Umbrella Thank you, Mr Tookman. A high school football championship is an amazing event for any school, for everyone."

Our local high school had never gotten past one particular rival school about two counties over. Several years ago, one of the players had cancer and his prognosis was grave. The family went through the "Make-a-Wish" foundation. His choice wasn't to go to Disney World, it was for the football team to get a new weight room. The team that trained in that weight room went beat the rival team (at least twice, if I remember correctly) and won state.

It was the size of school where, the Friday before the first game in some years, they would make an announcement that anybody that wanted to start playing football could talk to the coach and he would suit up for that game. The impact of that championship on the community, to include my kids that had graduated years earlier, was "yuge!"

Blogger Section 8A April 28, 2020 11:03 AM  

One of the most sinister and destructive things in "school" is the introduction of the idea that pulling yourself up from your bootstraps and hard work are punch lines, things said during yesteryear and not to be taken seriously.

"The only secret is there are no secrets, unless work is a secret". - T. Sowell, 'The Education of Minority Children

https://media.hoover.org/sites/default/files/documents/0817928928_79.pdf

Blogger wgmeisheid April 28, 2020 11:04 AM  

Quadko wrote:Where there is life, there is hope.

But one favorite memory from books was ERB, Tarzan, I think. Locked in a dungeon, awaiting execution, things look bad.

His line was, "I yet live."

I still recall it decades later. And the amazing power of authors and fiction to teach real character.

What we read is important.

I read all of ERB's John Carter of Mars books when I was much younger and was one of the few who enjoyed the movie (I own it and watch it regularly). There are several "never give up" characters in the movie, especially John, who labored diligently for years to get back to "Barsoom" and his princess. There are also several SJW's and gammas who want to be alphas but obviously aren't in the movie also. I think almost all really truly evil are gammas and secret kings, since much, if not all evil is motivated by jealousy and the false idea of the "that could have been me if only I had the chance" mantra.

Blogger wgmeisheid April 28, 2020 11:09 AM  

Considering the topic, I think it is fitting that the Buffalo Bills, who are a study in consistent failure to win a Super Bowl, are also the team that had the greatest comeback in playoff history. You don't have to win the final game to be an example of never say die. Sometimes the real heroes are the ones who fall short but never give up trying despite not being able to hold the final trophy. Those teams were still great by any measure and Marv Levy was still a great Hall of Fame coach.

Blogger wgmeisheid April 28, 2020 11:22 AM  

And while I am using literary comparisons, one cannot forget Eustace Clarence Scrubb in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C.S. Lewis. There is someone who started out a gamma but over the course of the book is redeemed from that fate and finds true bravery so that by the Last Battle makes it all the way to a Beta by diligence and effort to change himself from the person raise by "boomer-like" parents (they were adults who had Eustace between the two World Wars) who perverted his beginning years. Eustace demonstrates that no one need be locked into gammahood, if they are willing to be redeemed by Aslan/Jesus Christ into a meaningful life of service to the true king.

Blogger Duke Norfolk April 28, 2020 12:09 PM  

@30 Yeah, that was weird. WTF?

Blogger Silly but True April 28, 2020 1:40 PM  

Also there is an entire difference of scale, except for possibly 10 or so college-level programs, between programs for kids and young adults vs. a professional football league — and one doesn’t even need to get into the illegalities, steroids, and questionable sports medicine serving primarily a for-profit enterprise — for those differences to be profoundly different.

Blogger Akulkis April 29, 2020 7:32 AM  

> The late Roger Nelson, my skydive parachuting mentor"

From Infogalactic:

"Death
In 2003, he was killed in a skydiving accident. He was landing his parachute with a group of skydivers when another jumper collided with his parachute, causing it to collapse. Nelson then fell about 50 feet and received fatal injuries."

> listed eight substantive rules for surviving the sport.

See above

"Then there was catch-all Rule Number Nine: No Matter What Happens, Never Ever Give Up!"

Rule #10
NEVER jump out of an airplane UNLESS there is a > 50% chance that if you stay in you will die in a crash.


Blogger Akulkis April 29, 2020 7:34 AM  

"Which of the sisters...Abby or Ann"

Oh, you mean (((Abby))) or (((Ann))), the two moral degenerates whose licentious bile was delivered into homes across the nation, every day, for decades.

Blogger Akulkis April 29, 2020 7:44 AM  

" It felt as if we had been flung out of Hawaii as a consequence of straightening out problems in a small deeply dysfunctional congregation."

Some people are DEEPLY ATTACHED to their problems, and don't want them solved. Sounds like you were punished for taking away what they wanted to keep.

There's an NCO in my unit who has about a dozen skin-tags on his face, which a dermatologist could remove in a < 1 hour with just local anesthesia for probably less than $200, and which would heal up over a weekend.

Hypnosis is a good way to solve problems that people are attached to. Not only can you remove the problem, you can also remove the memory that they even had the problem to begin with. (Too long to explain here, but if you want details, contact hypnotherapist Mark Cunningham, at TRUCOR, http://trucor.com/ in Sylvania, Ohio).

Blogger Akulkis April 29, 2020 7:57 AM  

"Fighter Ace Doug Bader was always my inspiration for never giving up. Lose two legs, you can still fly and fight."

More inspiring, after being shot down and captured, Bader escaped from POW camps FOUR TIMES (including being one of the ones who got out in "The Great Escape" from Stalag Luft 3). Then the Luftwaffe transferred him to their place of habitual escapees: Colditz Castle -- built on a large outcropping of rock in the middle of river.

Colditz Castle is the place where a couple prisoners were building a wood & cloth glider in an attic -- fortunately, never completed, because the main spar in the wings was too weak to support their weight, and so they would have crashed into the river and probably died.

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