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Thursday, February 04, 2021

Boomers baffled as their music dies

This is literally music to my ears:

Back in 1959, on the cusp of the Swinging Sixties, I was posted to Germany as part of my National Service and quickly found myself a new niche. In those days, the Forces radio station played an endless diet of Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee — both wonderful singers, but their music was the sort of thing we young servicemen associated with our parents.

We wanted something different, something to call our own — and we'd found it in rock 'n' roll.

Powerful and energetic, these new songs had exploded on to the music scene to become the anthems for our changing times.... This was the dawn of two decades which would usher in some of the greatest music ever made and the greatest lyrics ever penned — written and performed by bands and solo artists whose names are now etched in the music hall of fame.

From Elvis and the Beatles to the Rolling Stones and The Who, Bob Dylan and the Kinks, Rod Stewart, Eric Clapton, Elton John, Queen — the music that emerged from that era has more than stood the test of time and is loved by baby boomers and their grandchildren alike.

Yet not, it seems, by the bigwigs at Radio 2.

As the Mail reported yesterday, it appears that they have quietly asked their DJs to 'scale back' on playing songs from the Sixties and Seventies in favour of music from the Eighties onwards.

I'm sure I can't be the only one who is baffled. Yes, the Eighties and Nineties produced some terrific music, but it seems sheer folly to deprive the Radio 2 audience of some of the hits from the decades before — whatever their age.

I've hated Boomer music for literally decades. To me, the main difference between classic rock and punk rock is that at least the punk rockers knew they didn't know how to play their instruments very well. There are ten-year-old girls now who play better guitar than the average classic rock guitarist. And it's hilarious to see the characteristic complete lack of self-consciousness inherent in the Boomer braggadacio about their lack of interest in their parents' music combined with their bafflement that their grandchildren have no interest in their music. 

The greatest music ever recorded? I think Beethoven and Mozart and Wagner might have a little something to say about that. No one even listens to the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, and the Kinks anymore and they're still alive. I think... I don't actually know or care. Generation Z thinks The Who comes from Mongolia.

Just go gently into that endless night, Boomer, to the comforting sounds of Hotel California if you please.

379 comments:

  1. I'd rather hear Swing or Big Band music than Beatles or Stones.

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    1. Dave Brubeck Quartet is one of my favorites. I never tire of listening to it. Of course I love my Power Metal as well.

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  2. Unlearn and Logical Progression are still in my rotation.

    Music exists outside of Boomer city limits. It's really worth looking for.

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  3. The boomers should be grateful their kids aren't doped out losers. The drugs were the only reason for liking that stuff.

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  4. At least there is a half-assed organic quality to Boomer Tunes.

    These days, music is so fxxxing digitally homogenized that it all sounds the same even when it doesn't.

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  5. My parents are having a hard time with this. They have spent their whole lives being catered to by different industries and the transition to irrelevance has been hard for them.

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    1. @Some Guy, At least they can console themselves with targeted Reverse Mortgage commercials.

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  6. Grug Bunga, who performed at the first Bunga Bunga party would take issue with your list of greatest music.

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    1. Bunga Bunga party is what Rick Wilson and Peter Strzok do in the Sodomy Suite at night after a romantic evening dinner at a second-tier Georgetown bistro

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  7. 90s music onwards is far better than anything that the boomers could play. Even bands famous from the 80s like Iron Maiden wrote their best songs in the 90s and 00s. Is there a single guitarist from the 60s and 70s that can play anything on the level of Ichika Nito or Band Maid? The good thing about music today is that you can choose what to listen to instead of relying on a radio hosted by women and homosexuals playing queer songs.

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    1. I'm not familiar with Ichiko Nota, but a quick video clip tells me I should look into his music further.

      There are certainly guitarists from the 60s and 70s who could (and still can) play with that level of skill. I saw one of them live a couple years ago. Robin Trower. I think he's still kicking.

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    2. Band Maid actually rekindled my interest in rock, it was the first thing I’d heard in a decade that didn’t sound like what some fat guy in a suit at the record company says “all the kids like this “.

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  8. Man, this was hilarious! haha 😂😂

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  9. Always loved 80s and 90s music. 60s and 70s were nice, but 80s were way better.

    Today's music though... Kind of suck.

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    1. @Eduardo

      If you think all music today sucks, you’re not looking hard enough. The sheer volume of music out there right now ensures that for every garbage track there is a great song from someone else. Just be willing to venture out of the mainstream and you’ll find it

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  10. Dave McGowan's work was a bizarre idea to me at first, but goes together well with the never-ending repeating nature of radio stations and record companies forcing certain music down everyone's throats.

    The CIA has been there at every stage of boomer culture, from the drugs to the music to the celebrity / press angle. Forget cocaine importing, that's just a side gig for cash. The "C" stands for culture.

    The best part of all of this is that the modern music scene is a renaissance of self-starters and ridiculous band names so the record companies (what skins they're left with) can't overtly control anything anymore. Fans can look up on the internet tubes the next names of the same bands such as "vampire weekend" or "death cab for cutie." No more serial killers / cult leaders, no more sons of admirals who start wars, no more alister crowley.

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  11. Amen. I never liked the Beattles, the Who, Rolling Stones, Janis Joplin. Disco was an improvement on that music. And the 80's music was even better. And if you like the music of Bing Crosby, and his generation, check out the Group Postmodern Jukebox, which takes current hits, and redoes the music in the Swing/Big Band style of the past.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sB6HY8r983c

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  12. We were at a nice all inclusive resort in Jamaica two years ago and at the main pool areas they were alternating early reggae and 80's rock all the afternoons long.

    I thought about it for a few minutes and looked around at my fellow guests and it made sense.

    Most boomers are old now. Their winter home in Arizona, their summer home near the former manufacturing plants they allowed to move to Mexico and China with the great jobs they had, their summer cottages in the resort areas, all those homes have grab bars in the shower and the interior doors off to easily use the walker.

    Meanwhile their children and grandchildren suffer with both parents working to afford the one home they bought in a decent district, and the grandkids scramble to find part time jobs to help out and maybe save a little for college.

    But the kids and grandkids can take comfort in the Facebook photos the boomers post from their 4 cruises a year and the other vacations.

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    1. Boomer Liberalism put a stop to cruises, I think. At least in America. With the Pandemic Scam finally leading them “willy-nilly” to open arms with totalitarianism. It’s funny how the “freest generation in history” can just eat their own!

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  13. Years ago I realized that when I listen to the music of my youth, I don't necessarily do so because the music is so great. I do it because those songs are associated with the good memories of my youth. I have many fond memories of that time in my life and music was often part of it, so the association will be forever. Over the years I've tried to expand my musical tastes beyond that of my youth, but I have found that I often enjoy silence as much as I do music. I must be getting old. sigh.

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  14. Music isn't just a YMMV thing, it's a YMWV thing.

    IMNSHO, music is about the one thing the Boomers didn't fuck up.

    Even if the notion that you can't be a real artist unless you do a lot of drugs and engage in degenerate sexual behavior is fucked up.

    An example to work toward for the future. A counterexample to the woodchopper of souls that is The Los Angeles Ticketing Agency.

    The Hotel California was pretty much an autobiographical account of Taking The Ticket.

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  15. The Beatles are worth remembering only because of George Martin and the fact that they had the budget to do things for the first time. Tape loops, slowing songs down to combine with different takes, etc.

    But lyrically Limp Bizkit were far more cleaver than anything the Rolling Stones ever did.

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  16. FINALLY! I f'n hate the Beetles! The most over-rated trash piles ever to burst onto the music scene. I can't wait until all of them and their dopplegangers are dead.

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    1. Only 1 Doppelgänger Beatle, in spite of anything Owen’s Sage/Mike Williams says. At least 1 that publicly took money performing when the initial “Paul is Dead” saga should have theoretically exposed him as a fraud to all concerned back in 1969. I’m sorry, there are a lot of “Imagine” haters, and that partly includes me, but Poor John. Poor Paul. Poor George. Poor Ringo. Go Liverpool!
      (New Yorkers used to LOVE them too. I truly believe Lennon’s murder was casually “under-investigated” in NYC, however, cuz of his observed history in print of speaking, shall we say, disrespectfully toward some Small Hats.)

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    2. I never liked the Beatles, but I will say Wings had some pretty good stuff. Live and Let Die is awesome, especially Guns N Roses rendition.

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  17. Why can’t we stick the shiv in a little farther and acknowledge that it’s not only the music that is dying but also their power and influence.

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  18. No one even listens to the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, and the Kinks anymore and they're still alive.

    I wish this was true. It just isn't. I am millenial myself and share your profound dislike for boomer music (most important and 'living' contemporary music is made in metal, neofolk and martial industrial in my opinion). However, I can think of very few of my age (of whose musical interests I know of at least) who don't adore some or other boomer music troupe. Ok, Elvis and other very early rock 'n roll isn't liked by many, but I know several Beatles fanatics who are under 30, not to mention those who dig things like Queen. On top of that, it seems those who have had academic music studies hold as a tenet that Pink Floyd's "The Dark Side of the Moon" is the greatest musical compilation ever compiled. They also praise Dylan every chance they get. So it might be indoctrinated in part, but this applies to non-academics as well. Younger kids seem to be even more enthralled by Beatles, from what I know. How and why is beyond me.

    Conversely nearly none my friends are able to bear a single classical composition and turn those off whenever I try to force some Bach* down my throats. Not even a little, and this more than anything causes my dismay.

    Friends badly chosen? I guess, but if I chose my friends on basis of appreciating (by my standards) good music , I wouldn't have friends at all.

    Don't take me wrong, they mostly listen to newer stuff, but they certainly like this excrement you justly condemn. Perhaps the situation is better elsewhere? (Mine is a Nordic country.)

    * Now he was the greatest. Nothing comes close to his use of counterpoint.

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  19. Straight out!
    That's pretty fucking harsh and all encompassing.
    Pop music or whatever you want to define it as.
    Has gone down the shitter since the start of the 21th century.
    The vaccous asinine crap being touted now is the bottom of the creative barrel.
    This is a good take on the total shiteness that passes for musical creation today.
    Internet radio is your saviour thank God.

    https://youtu.be/oVME_l4IwII

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  20. "The people who watch the ratings numbers want less of it, but that's baffling, because all my friends love it." I guess this is what happens when your generation has been catered to for your entire life due to its size and spending power, and that finally starts to trickle away.

    We have a local radio station whose tagline is "70s, 80s, 90s, and today." That's actually pretty good, because no mainstream music made since 1999 is worth listening to more than a few times. So throw out everything between 2000 and last week, don't go too heavily on the early 70s stuff from when the 60s was still bleeding over, and you get a lot of 80s and 90s.

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  21. The only 60s band worth anything is The Kinks in my opinion. Ray Davies' cynical songwriting about the decline of the British Empire is the musical equivalent of Evelyn Waugh.

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    1. While that is a very apt comparison (I read Waugh’s “Decline and Fall” fer high school book report, and know the Kinks album you reference), I cannot really think of a listenable song Ray Davies did AFTER the 1960s (well, not many), apart from the ubiquitous (and, sadly, “Trans”-prefiguring) “Lola”, also known as Yoda. Davies was definitely the Damon Albarn of His Day, too. Early Peak....

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    2. The Kinks were basically locked out of the United States from 1964-1969 because a gatekeeper from the American Federation of Touring Musicians locked them out.

      And, also, because whatever ticket you needed to take to override some third rate union flunkies, they did not take.

      So it goes.

      Chicago was frozen out of the R&R HOF for decades because gatekeeper Jann Wenner didn't want them in, probably not at all related to the band aligning with the Italian mob to keep the Jewish mob at arm's length.

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    3. Hah! Never knew that about Chicago, and it almost makes me wish I was a fan. Did know about the Kinks.... Mick Avory bashed Dave Davies over the head with a cymbal onstage, too! Fun Group.

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    4. For Conspiracy Theorists, one of the promoters the Kinks encountered in the U.S. became a famous Midwest child-killer years later, so it’s better they stayed away. Never knew that about Chicago, tho...

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    5. Muswell Hillbillies in 1971 was their last truly great album. After that it's just a scattered handful of good songs.

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  22. I wish this was true. It just isn't.

    You're completely out of touch because you're a would-be music snob. I have children. They have lots of friends. I also belong to a football club with over one hundred players under 20. Literally NONE of them EVER listens to any classic rock or Boomer music.

    I've heard them listen to everything from Nightwish to Taylor Swift and The Hu, in addition to Europop and rap trash. I've literally never heard any of them ever play a single Beatles, Who, or Pink Floyd song, and none of them could identify Bob Dylan if you paid them.

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    1. I can think of one positive Cultural effect of the media-wide Scamdemic obsession: No one cares who Taylor Swift is anymore. Or Katy Perry.
      It’s like she’s the guy from Saved by the Bell who croaked. A couple of years ago, Time or Newsweek had a magazine cover saying Swift IS the music industry. Come Pandemic 2020: “Cute but no cigar, kid, try making us another Selfie video”

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  23. Generation Z thinks The Who comes from Mongolia.

    Ha! Speaking of "powerful and energetic," The Hu have more power and energy in their little fingers than all the acts he lists combined. Sure, Clapton or Queen rocked sometimes, but most of the music he's talking about was used to get high and "mellow out." (If the late Dave McGowan was right, it was specifically designed for that purpose.) He only thinks of it as "powerful" because of the generational and political context around it.

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    1. Death on Two Legs is a cruelty artist at work.

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  24. After listening to Owen, and his mentions of people like Sage of Quay (who spends hours deconstructing this stuff), I wonder how many of those "timeless" groups from 1960s were real and wrote their own music, and how many were hired actors (just like The Monkees) with music and lyrics written by others, with subversion of the culture in mind.

    When you learn that Jim Morrison's father was the man on the scene at the Gulf of Tonkin incident, among many other odd relationships and connections among his contemporaries, it becomes increasingly improbable that these rock stars are who we are told.

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    1. @Shimshon

      Good point. Check out a place called Laurel Canyon, and the links between military intelligence and lots of those groups/artists who made it big in the 60's.

      Wagner, Mozart etc will still be listened to hundreds of years from now.

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    2. Kris Kristofferson. Rhodes scholar. Ranger. Helicopter pilot. Then hippie?

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  25. Right, I mean... I have different taste. I liked the Beatles. But if I were to play them now it would be for small children because they're easily accessible. I've heard them, and even though I don't have some kind of vendetta, I'm good.

    The punk rock comment is interesting because I also loved punk rock, perhaps not the really unskilled bands. Technical prowess on the bass guitar is not why I listen to music.

    It is funny that the OP names the top most popular bands. Which, to be sure, are representative. The Rolling Stones in particular I feel brought nothing special other than polished execution. If I had to pick classic rock to "stand the test of time" or have some kind of meaning, would include Chuck Berry and Led Zeppelin. The Kinks???? Come on.

    Most people loved garbage 80 years ago and we haven't evolved, so it stands to reason that kids today would love classic rock if it were fed to them the right way. Not much point to attempting that.

    There is some merit in rotating the top hits from more decades, but I'm not sure the effect is what the Radio company wants.

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  26. 1940 & pre-Rock 50s had better musicians and singers. In the late 50s and early 60s, Rock became the equivalent of pouring Karo syrup into the ears;I switched to country music; now I listen to country-folk; and Steampunk music is fun. Main stream country is basically bar music about drunks, whores, and ain't women so special.
    Before I left Spotify, I had a list of classical composers I listened to.

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  27. If you want to do a pilgrimage maybe the Ottobeuren Abbey is a good place to see one of the best, if not the best, instruments ever made. BWV 565 on the organ is amazing.

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  28. Reject boomers and their degenerate music.

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  29. Haha in Atlanta, there's the current music station, then there's the classic station-- "The biggest hits from 80's, 90's, and now." Meanwhile my boomer dad tries to convince me that new musicians are 'rediscovering' the beatles and the rolling stones... suure they are. The general populace couldn't care less and wouldn't tune in for it.

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  30. Woe to the Florence Nightingale weeping over their propaganda. Boomer screed, of course, reeks of “What about meeeeee?”

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  31. Rick Beato has an interesting video about how most of today's music is made by a guy with a laptop and a girl singer who wants to be famous.

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    1. Have you seen his latest video about getting a copyright strike? Boomer bands sniping a man making videos about how great he thinks their music is - shared with his millions of followers.

      His videos are possibly the only exposure younger generations get to Boomer music. They're literally killing their legacy for, what, a few cents?

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  32. I knew the cultural shift was in progress as early as the late 90's to early 2k's. I distinctly recall walking through a VHS rental store and over hearing the young sales clerk inviting the also young couple he was talking with to a "eightys" party that weekend. One of the most unexpected heart warming things I recall from that period of my life.

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  33. Or to appropriate old D.J. Jazzy Jeff...."Boomers, they just don't understand....."

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  34. I've heard Millennials *say* they like the Beatles. I've never heard them *listen* to the Beatles. At the bars in town, if a Millennial goes to the jukebox, the oldest thing you'll get is AC/DC or maybe Bob Seger. Some classic rock, but no real Boomer music. I assume those digital jukeboxes have it all. Maybe it gets played in hip night clubs, but I doubt it, unless they're having an ironic Ferris Bueller "Twist and Shout" night or something.

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  35. I am truly baffled by the Beatles worship. They had some good tunes; the early stuff that organically evolved from late 50s rock is far superior to their later 'throw everything on the album because the kids will buy it anyway' crap. The White Album, in particular, qualifies as a crime against music. But I remember reading a book years ago that just fellated them to an insane degree. 'It was like Mozart and Beethoven working together!' No, it was not. Mozart wrote better tunes in his sleep. When he was six. The Beatles' combined output over nine years was twelve albums and about fifteen hours of music. Mozart wrote almost twenty times that much in thirty years.

    I have an extensive collection of pop music that I have downloaded. I will not apologize for my love of Elton John's music; he is an absolute artist on the keyboard, regardless of his personal life issues. Unlike Billy Joel, he doesn't have a set of patterns and musical cues that immediately identify his tunes, yet I can almost always recognize that I'm listening to an Elton song, even one I'm not familiar with. I can't explain it, I just know it.

    But in no way am I going to put him above Liszt or Chopin. I'm slowly replacing that collection with an even more extensive collection of real music. For those who have listened to the standard repertoire already (Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, etc.) I recommend Montiverdi's books of madrigals, and Palestrina's masses. Vivaldi is also an excellent fill-in for Baroque music; he wrote a heck of a lot more than the Four Seasons.

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  36. GenXer here. I like the music in a lot of 60s/70s rock. In retrospect, though, I see that the lyrics were not just harmless fluff, but a part of the process that has created the stupidest political movements in history.

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    1. Hendrix, Led Zepplin and Black Sabbath. Those are they bands I love from that era. Of course you thrown in Rush as well. But most of the 60s artists were horrible musicians. And after reading the Laurel Canyon, it was obvious that it was one big psych op.

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  37. We don't need no education
    We dont need no thought control
    No dark sarcasm in the classroom
    Teachers leave them kids alone
    Hey! Teachers! Leave us kids alone!
    All in all it's just another brick in the wall.
    All in all you're just another brick in the wall.


    Prophetic Pink Floyd

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  38. To be fair, not all Boomer music was created equal. There are plenty of gems from the era if you are willing to look for them, but you won't find most of them on the top radio shuffles.

    Every generation has their version of music produced by and for the establishment along with artists that refuse to take the ticket, or at least produce music that is not promoted as heavily despite being objectively better.

    I think the issue with the Boomers is that they adopted what was mainstream and popular in their time as actually being something special when it was just their generation's version of the same garbage you hear on the Top40 stations today. It would be akin to a millennial like myself arguing that Britney Spears and Sugar Ray made timeless music that my grandchildren should listen to.

    I mean...the WHO? Good drummer, but how TF were they even relevant at any point in time?

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    1. Even though drummer Keith Moon was, I think, the best thing about them, essentially l emphasizing melodies and lyrics the way someone on hear thinks it took Neil Peart (!) to invent, their lyricist, Pete Townshend, knew how to play the publicity game, was a smart interviewee... and a Very Disturbed Character. I think we’d all probably rather Not know the truth!

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  39. I hate everything about hippies including their music.

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  40. Yes, Boomer, 'powerful and energetic' was specifically chosen for your generation.

    Though it's nothing like powerful and energetic classical music, or other forms of music.

    This particular 'style' of music was designed to agitate you, to create anxiety and dissonance in you... to create powerful levels of agitation that seek relief. Physical agitation that seeks physical relief.

    You all found that relief in alcohol, drugs, and sex outside of marriage.

    Hmmmm, this same mass agitation/dissonance project aimed at the Boomer youth happened to occur at the very same time the mass anti-Christian, Leftist culture propaganda (movies, tv, academia, literature, scientific nihilism) kicked into high gear.

    Cohencidence? I think not, Boomer.

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  41. In 1977 I hope I go to heaven
    'Cause I been too long on the dole
    And I can't work at all
    Danger stranger
    You better paint your face
    No Elvis, Beatles, or The Rolling Stones
    In 1977
    In 1977

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  42. Boomer music has been one of the reasons why boomers are still booming.

    Owen brought this up once. Basically you can use music to a certain extent to mold people. Zoolander made a parody of it but there is subtler truth to it.
    Almost every radio station that plays music plays classic rock. Mostly boomer shit. Boomers listen to that. I know an eternal boomer who runs the radio every day and it's all classic boomer stuff.
    I don't know any GenXer who still listens to the stuff they were into when they were teenagers. Not daily, not all day every day.
    This is why typical boomers are still teenagers mentally. And not just teenagers, but 1960s Golden Age hubris filled teenagers. Try telling one about the Hart Cellar Act of 1965 and how their generation had a lifetime of doing nothing about it and the response you get is not much different than from a teenager being told he's wrong about something.
    And I think this was done on purpose.
    Since the boomers are starting to drop off, thank God, so is there less need to keep their conditioning going with the classic rock.
    We won't be seeing much of this being done to GenX. Partly because they don't do as much FM radio as boomers, but mostly because if they tried to put GenX mentally back in their teenage years there would be a revolution that would make the Spanish Civil War look like a slap fight.

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    1. In their defense, they can hear it all day cuz relatively little of the music was based in Distorted Guitars. It’s actually jarring when some of the harder-hitting Boomer Music, such as “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” As great as I think the best of Alice In Chains and Nirvana is, and how it and the better non-Party Rap is capable of making someone want to burn tha b*tch down, most can’t listen to all-day-in-day-out, and the Best of the Rest of ‘90s Classics could barely fill two CD-Rs.

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    2. I meant to add the Beatles’ “Revolution” along with JJF to the count of hard-hitting Boomer Rock. Jest thinkin’ about it makes me too hard to cut-and-paste my thoughts further...;) Ruined for ‘80s Yoofs by its use in Nike commercial. Yawn!

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  43. I've got satellite radio in the car. I never listen to the classic rock stations, I listen to the rock from the 90s through today and there's a number of good bands today. On Sundays I listen to Swing for a bit as it was the music my father liked when he was young.

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  44. @13 Big Bob
    My experience, too. Growing up in the 50's and 60's I listened to the same music my age group did. I had no idea what was good musically. Some songs I liked and some I didn't.

    I was aware that the same pop music was being pushed nationwide. It amused me living in Southern California that kids in the midwest liked the Beach Boys.

    Hearing an oldie can produce nostalgia for a particular time and place. Those were more innocent times with Roy Rogers, Annette Funicello and "I Love Lucy."

    After returning from serving in the Army in Germany I no longer listened to any popular music. When I happen to listen to the radio I switch on the classical station.

    I wasn't the quality of the music of my generation but the association with my youth and simpler times.

    Bye, bye, Miss American Pie

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  45. So do kids these days listen to a lot of Mozart and Bach?

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  46. i mean there obviously were talented musicians from the 70s... but most of them peaked during the 80s. Van Halen... Rush... But even then... those bands are primarily interesting today for the innovation the represented. For example... up until Rush... the rhythm section of a band was the bass guitar and drums. They played together and played off each other.

    Neil Peart changed that. He didn't play with Geddy's bass. Neil played off the melody and focused more on the actual guitar riff and vocals. Neil was a huge influence on pretty much every drummer.. ever. So when you listen to Lars play on Ride the Lightning or Master of Puppets you see that he is also playing off the main riffs and vocals... not the bass. That gave Metallica a very different sound.. and you can tell the radical difference when you listen to the Black Album... which was produced by some damn Boomer and he made Lars play more traditionally with the bass. That's why so many Metallica fans were shocked by the Black Album and why so many fans of normie rock embraced it.

    Eddie Van Halen was similarly innovative with lead guitar. The world was not the same after Eruption.. as cliche as it sounds to say... but it is never the less accurate. Now.. what came after Eddie left him in the dust.. as is always the case. But never the less... they were standing on his shoulders. Even if they were better than him.

    But be that as it may... these guys are the exceptions that do not disprove the rule. The Stones were terrible musicians. The Beattles were terrible musicians. And don't even get me started on the idiots in The Who... or... ***pukes*** Kiss.

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    1. That’s such an interesting observation to me. I never paid close attention to music rhythms. I’m a singer/vocalist and the melody line and rhythm of words/poetry was always a bigger thing for me. I didn’t notice that rhythm focus changed in the instruments.

      That’s more a classical music thing, too, where the instrumental work is largely done in intricate melodies and harmonies, not in steady, rhythmic bass/percussion.

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  47. Yeah, CIA engineered music, just like MK-Ultra creating, maybe unwittingly, the first real batch of serial killers, some half dozen operating in the US by the late 60's.

    Jim Morrison's father being an Admiral involved in Tonkin and the USS Liberty is a red flag. That whole "Laurel Canyon" set having government/military/intelligence ties through family is also disturbing.

    I suspect the whole hippie movement was created to short-circuit the rising tide of expectations fostered in the post-war era. The government probably calculated that the prosperity was not sustainable so they engineered the hippie movement to short-circuit it.

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    1. Apart from MAYBE the Jam’s “Eton Rifles”, tearing down an Elite Brit school, and the 3 Famous Sex Pistols singles, I’ll always maintain that Lennon’s “Revolution,” hated by the ‘80s for its use in Nike commercials, along with JL’s later “Working Class Hero,” are songs that tapped out the root of rock music that could rally the masses for its protest content. Even The Who’s “Won’t Get Fooled Again” just inspires more mindless booze-swilling and bong-sniffing, and “Waiting on the World to Change” by John Mayer inspired faint memories... As far as Dave McGowan’s claims, that stoner hippie (anyone ever HEARD the guy stumble and stutter on old podcast shows...), or CIA asset (his website literally was called “Center for Informed America”) has never been able to prove one thing he asserted (I shouldn’t Assume he’s Dead if I allow the example of all the Miles Mathis’s that have come up in his wake). A lot of people had military parents after that industry’s ‘40s-‘60s boom. The moving around probably prepared all the Mamas and Papas and that totally non-conformist Zappa for the travails of Star Life. People who think Jim Morrison and his father were scum, note that his dad raised some stink about the U.S. Liberty incident, only to have his son drowned or hotshotted a few years later. Even my best ol’ boomer hippie friend, addled as he was, back when he had his record store he’d tell tales of dropping out of his science program when he realized he was essentially just being programmed to create bombs. Thought it better to be a Deadhead.
      (Along w/ Jerry GarCIA.;).

      Final Point: sometimes, even when they thought they were righting their equivalent of a Party Rights song, as in Stephen Stills’ “For What It’s Worth,” the music and singing got it mistaken for a whole lot more...

      Delete
  48. A high quality blog post.
    Repetitive lyrics, brainless and repeating riffs, bland harmonies, one not melodies.... this was the framework to which modern pop trash and rap have been crafted. Why wouldn't 'music factories' do from knowing that it could be sold to millions of fools.

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    1. When I started learning guitar, I actually started with some Beatles songs because of how simple the chords and progressions were. (Paperback Writer, for example, is just two chords, both open). The only boomer artists that were complex and challenging, at least in my experience, were the Beach Boys and David Bowie. The bulk of 90s indie and early 00s SoCal pop are vastly more intricate and varied than what the talented portion of boomers came up with 30-40 years earlier.

      Delete
  49. Yeah. Who the hell listens to Bummer music now a days? I remember listening to classical and 80s music in general when I was a kid. Lately, Blues and 80s metal music. I can't think of one Bummer song I truly enjoy regularly.

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  50. "is loved by baby boomers and their grandchildren alike"
    You mean the grandchildren you never visit?

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  51. Not going to lie, I enjoy a lot of boomer music, but I enjoy classical, country, punk, metal, some electronic and a lot of other stuff as well. What's never made sense to me was the deification of bands. Led Zeppelin, Beatles, Greatful Dead, Rolling Stones, yeah, I like some of their tunes but not to the point where it needed to be akin to a religious cult. The whole boomer solipsism and tendency towards revisionist history rendered them completely unable to understand that everything and everyone has a season, and their music will fade like ragtime and flapper music, as will whatever is current today will in the future. It really isn't all about you. And I don't even really harbor them any ill either. Theirs is rather tragic. Previous generations didn't have the animosity towards the younger generations and see them as competition. Because of that, those generations got to reap rewards boomers will never see.

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  52. My theory on why a certain blogger hates the Boomers and Beatles, when he was coming thru the music scene the early Boomers were firmly in charge of the music "industry" and everyone of those sh*t buckets had a Beatles story, a Beatles autograph on the wall, and compared everything to the Beatles.

    Listen kids back in the day say about the 80s if an idiot started rambling on music radio about music you damn well knew the Beatles would be worked into the story somehow, and never mention the Beatles' hours radio stations would play.

    Back in 88 I worked with a guy who's brother was a studio musician in LA and he got invited to a shoot for a G&R video and his description of Slash was basically no talent dumfuck. You will be told what is popular and like it, peasant.

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  53. Welcome to the free market, boomer. If you don't like it, start your own radio station.

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  54. Nate, that wall of text proves that the arcana of Boomer music is your true love, not guns or whiskey. I am surprised.

    I wonder how someone like Cat Stevens is considered. He was a genuine and huge star in the 1960s before later walking away entirely for decades. Yes, his music is highly associated with Boomers, but maybe that is more due to Harold and Maude than him or his music.

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  55. "The Eighties and Nineties produced some terrific music"....like what? Amongst my family and friends, the sixties and seventies stuff is still regarded as outstanding, and I know a young waitress who has nothing after 1973 on her phone....

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  56. Heck, I still remember a cafeteria argument over Jesus Jones lyrics. The debate was whether it was "Bob Dylan used to sing about it" or "think about it." The pro-think camp thought it made no sense for a newscaster to "sing" about anything while the other camp argued it was metaphorical.

    The point is that in 1992 or whenever, prettyvmuch all the regular music listeners at the table assumed that Bob Dylan was some talking head from the media. The two people who knew the difference were in bands, but they didnt care enough to correct anyone.

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  57. I'm a Boomer that listens to none of it. Music was my god for too long, and it (70s, 80s mostly) takes me to dark places I do not wish to go.

    Hosana Integrities with the occasional foray into the Hu for a nationalist vibe and, Baby Metal when I want to listen to the sound of anime hamsters being shredded in a metal recycler.

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  58. Most people love the music they grew up with. Our time will come as the young curse us for ushering in transgender nonsense and Lord knows what else. Okay Xer.

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  59. So much fuss about the merits of the rather shallow music that we Boomers sometimes like to listen to because it reminds us of good times past. I personally also like to listen to Glenn Miller and Billy Holiday just as much as I do the rock/Motown oldies, and I listen to Mozart even more frequently. Frankly, however, this Boomer thing has an obsessive compulsive Pavlovian quality to it. Talking (and talking and talking) about a bunch of 70 and 80 somethings, Really? Our time is past, and one would think that the Dark Lord, of all people, has much more interesting subjects to discuss. As a Boomer, I suppose that I should be thankful for being made the center of so much attention, incomprehensible though it may be to me.

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  60. Gen X-er here who listen's to more Palestrina, Victoria, Mozart and Lauridsen than anything else these days. I do like to put on those awesome retro-wave mixes on youtube also, when pumping the irons. I went through the classic rock phase in my teens, but it all sounds so insipid and irritating now, apart from the odd Cream number. Give me Metallica over over the Stones any day!

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  61. Why are Boomers so mediocre. And shadows of their ancestors?

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  62. Greatest lyrics ever penned? Seriously?

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  63. *radio hosted by women and homosexuals playing queer songs*

    This. I had to take a cab to work for the last month, and most of the drivers listen to the radio. My colleagues started asking why I was so depressed in the morning.

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  64. "The Stones were terrible musicians. The Beatles were terrible musicians."
    Doubtful...
    and missing the point entirely..It's the songs' melodies, lyrics, and emotional appeal that matter to most of us who aren't autistic....

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  65. KJE wrote:Why can’t we stick the shiv in a little farther and acknowledge that it’s not only the music that is dying but also their power and influence.

    Yes. It has nothing to do with musical skill or anything else better or worse about their music.

    Entertainment is always dominated by whoever is currently in the 30-50 year old range because they have money and power. That's why all the old reruns are from the 80' and 90's and even the new films and movies do what would otherwise seem like an overabundance of throwbacks to that era too.

    There's plenty still playing to the boomers, but that's mostly more bandwidth and because they haven't all been totally reverse mortgaged out of their wealth by fellow boomers yet.

    A lot of what was genuinely special about that era (really the 50's-90's) was nothing more than technological evolution. It seems a common thread that every generation mistakes what they can do with better technology as them actually being more accomplished. Almost always wrong.


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  66. The key to continued relevance on this earth is to be a follower of Christ Jesus, first and foremost. There is literal eternity involved and you are plugged into the historical timeline that extends from the first to the last day. In more mundane matters, stick with the classics that never grow stale. I just started a chess club for this same reason. I both want to improve my own game and pass it on the next gen.

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  67. @14

    I think that's probably the best assessment I've seen here (Hotel California/Ticket).

    Interesting that this comes up the day after "The Day the Music Died". Discussions like this definitely put a song like "American Pie" into an even more interesting perspective.

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  68. The only reason why Rock and Roll took off the way it did and rocked the music world is because technology made it more accessible, therefore more ubiquitous. While I hate Bing Crosby, his music is from an era where the only way it was brought into the household was via radio stations on a limited radio box with no customization controls of what you hear. Musicians had to compete for limited air time.

    Unlike today, where anyone can put a video on YouTube and recording equipment is/was becoming more affordable. It isn’t that my generation is making worse music and are talentless hacks. It’s that the barriers to entry and the market proliferation makes it easier for dreck to find a marketable audience.

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  69. I always find it comically when a Boomer heaps scorn on prior generations and then immediately turns around and complains about "Ok, Boomer". That phrase is simultaneously much more tame than the things they said and did, and more cutting because they never imagined criticism would leveled at their generation.

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  70. This may be true for rock music, but country music has been in decline since 1980. Country music from the 60s & 70s was better than anything that came before or after(with a few exceptions like Hank Williams Sr). Back then we had the likes of Tammy Wynette, George Jones, Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, Loretta Lynn, Glen Campbell, et al. at their peak. I've always hated the Beatles.

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  71. The Kinks best material is from the 80s. That's the era dedicated fans hate. State of Confusion still gets rotation in my collection. Village Green Society, never. I love 80s music. Low Budget was 1979 I think so I classify it as 80s since it has a more punk sound.

    To me, the main difference between classic rock and punk rock is that at least the punk rockers knew they didn't know how to play their instruments very well.

    Hahaha. And metal does it better. Old Metallica is what punk wishes it could be. Megadeth too. Both get heavy rotation in my car.

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  72. I am a tail end boomer (I can feel the hate...LOL). My parents were young children during the depression and teens during the big war. As a child I mostly listened to whatever they listened too (wasn't much choice, one car radio, one house radio, one TV set-sometimes when not in the shop...LOL), got a transistor radio in my early teens, so cool... Mostly listened to talk as I thought the Beatles etc were not that interesting. I was into Pink Floyd later in my mid teens, but you have to remember, PF was not popular at that time, that came later. Liked a couple songs like Stranglehold and stuff like that, stuff that definitely was not popular. As a young adult I settled into Lou Reed, JJ Cale (though I thought Eric Clapton was too bubble gum). What do I listen to now? Mindi Abair, Beegie Adair, mostly what some would call 'traditional' Christian music or Classical (or most of the time silence). After damaging my hearing (job related, never went to concerts and the like, snowmobiles and firearms can do a lot of damage) and the resulting recurring background noise silence is quite nice. Truthfully, never cared what anyone thought of my musical choices (trust me, Lou Reed, Ted Nugent, Pink Floyd? were not, regardless of what hollyweird tries to tell you now, mainstream in the seventies). You don't like my music? Move along, I don't like yours, I'll move along. Life is actually easy. To live peaceably with all men. So just a couple of thoughts, First: never forget "90% of everything is crap". And of the 10% left over, most of it is not very good either. Second: nobody, deep down actually gives a hoot about you. Their too busy thinking about them selves. Third: you and only you are accountable to God for your actions (praise God I am born again). So: did the boomers mess things up? Did their parents let them? Has every 'generation' (what a way to divide people up to better sell them things) screwed up? Yep. So what.
    Live 'your' life. Do right, till the stars fall. (and check out Mindi Abair or Beegie Adair, pretty good....LOL). js

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    1. Boomer and a gamma. Radioactive combination there.

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  73. "Doubtful...
    and missing the point entirely..It's the songs' melodies, lyrics, and emotional appeal that matter to most of us who aren't autistic...."

    found the boomer.

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    1. Lyrics about taking drugs, fornicating, and communism and generally only emotionally appealing to communists who do drugs and fornicate. And the melodies of 69s and 70s music oscillates between irritating and boring. You're confusing novelty-value nostalgia for substance.

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  74. When I would visit my mother in Florida they had a radio station that played music from the 30's and 40's. She liked listening to it because it reminded her of her youth. It was okay, because I have a wide interest in music, and can listen to almost anything. Then they changed the format to 60's, 70's, and 80's. Ugh! It was soo bad. I went back to listening to my playlists and she just listened to cd's she bought.

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  75. Amongst my family and friends, the sixties and seventies stuff is still regarded as outstanding.

    That's because none of them are musicians or know anything about music. The average YouTube guitarist is not only a vastly better technician than most stars of Boomer rock, he also knows far more about music theory.

    Boomer music is dying with the Boomers. Deal with it. It's over.

    (whistles cheerfully, puts on Mozart piano sonatas)

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  76. Harris wrote:Amen. I never liked the Beattles, the Who, Rolling Stones, Janis Joplin. Disco was an improvement on that music. And the 80's music was even better. And if you like the music of Bing Crosby, and his generation, check out the Group Postmodern Jukebox, which takes current hits, and redoes the music in the Swing/Big Band style of the past.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sB6HY8r983c


    100% agree on PMJ. They actually made an Usher song tolerable (and hysterically funny). Hell, they even did a cover of a Lady Gaga song that reintroduced tap-dancing to a whole new generation.

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  77. " Okay Xer."

    there is a big difference between X and the Boomers. We can separate what we like vs what is The Greatest.

    I like Blues Traveler. I would never argue that BT was one of the greatest bands ever.

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  78. I'll second Postmodern Jukebox, and there are some youngster indie solo and groups on Youtube that are really good. I'm a boomer and I never listen to boomer music. Bob Dylan sucks. Just remember the boomers also brought you Barry Manilow and Captain and Tennile, oh the horror!

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  79. Boomers' tastes in music goes with their lack of traditional education in favor of their "crendentialist" college degrees!

    As with anything, the BEST education you get is being self-taught.

    While I can listen to and enjoy music from every era and style ("ghetto NOIZ" and "world music" excepted) I have my personal eclectic favorites as well, from La Gazza Ladra, Habenera and Nessun Dorma; to Maple Leaf Rag; to Artie Shaw, Glenn Miller and Basie; to the Beach Boys, Four Tops, Stones and Stevie Ray; to Bach, Mozart and Beethoven...

    Limit your taste in music and you limit your connection to others and your own intelligence!

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  80. It seems a common thread that every generation mistakes what they can do with better technology as them actually being more accomplished.

    You could not be more wrong. It's not better technology that permits today's guitarists to do things no guitarist from the 60's ever imagined. It wasn't better technology that made Neal Peart or Eddie Van Halen great, it was creative innovation.

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  81. there is a big difference between X and the Boomers. We can separate what we like vs what is The Greatest.

    (nods) Boomers are so solipsistic that they can't even imagine we aren't like them and are not repeating their mistakes.

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  82. Argentinian golden rock era are genx and it is still strong.
    Awesome music and i recommend, but eventually will suffer the same fate

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  83. This was the dawn of two decades which would usher in some of the greatest music ever made and the greatest lyrics ever penned

    THIS IS WHY I HATE THEM.

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  84. "Nate, that wall of text proves that the arcana of Boomer music is your true love, not guns or whiskey. I am surprised."

    You're almost right. My true love is music history and music theory... not specifically boomer music. All music. I can tell you stories of music history that will make you laugh.. and make you want to cry.

    Have you ever heard a Charasmatic talk about speaking in tongues and what it "really is"? They are insane. They are idiots.

    But what they think speaking in tonques is... is what music really is. A means of communication that speaks to the created soul of man.

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  85. "It seems a common thread that every generation mistakes what they can do with better technology as them actually being more accomplished."

    FFS.

    no.

    Les Claypool isn't a stud because he has a newer fancy bass that does things the old timers couldn't do.

    He is a stud because he took the claw hammer playing style from blue grass and applied it to metal bass guitar.

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    1. Jilly's on smack.
      And she won't be coming back.
      For the holidays.

      Claypool is pretty good on the double bass too!

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  86. One weird thing about articles like this is that they lump together what I've always thought of as two different genres or ages of music. I had Gen-X friends in college who loved classic rock and had a whole shelf of albums from the Eagles, Clapton, etc. One guy had every album ever made by Chicago, including the early stuff when they were the Chicago Transit Authority. No Beatles. No Elvis. That was thought of as the previous generation of music, not cool at all. The years may have overlapped somewhat, but the fans didn't. So it's weird now to see nostalgic Boomers claim it all together.

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  87. The lack of self awareness is astounding. Not only to write it but also to edit it and publish it and not have even a tiny bit of consideration the younger generations could feel like you do.

    Oh well, boomers gonna boomer. Twice the pride, double the fall into irrelevancy.

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  88. my fantasy series in high school was unfortunately the dark tower, and i am still stunned to this day that stephen king wrote the song velcro fly by zz top into his series as a plot point.
    the god-drums of lud couldn't just be any old drums, they couldn't have been inspired by zz top's new-wave era drums, couldn't have even just left it at eddie saying hey that sounds like newer zz top. no no no, it is, canonically, velcro fly by zz top, because *kshk* *glug glug glug* now THATS music.
    IN A FUCKING FANTASY SERIES.

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  89. pyrrhus wrote:"The Stones were terrible musicians. The Beatles were terrible musicians."

    Doubtful...

    and missing the point entirely..It's the songs' melodies, lyrics, and emotional appeal that matter to most of us who aren't autistic....

    The melodies are simplistic and repetitive. The chord progressions are so basic that they have been mocked incessantly for years. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMshvUReunc) The lyrics are either banal or overtly sexual (or, more often, both), and the appeal is to the most base of emotions, particularly the libido. It's substituting a phonograph needle for a heroin needle.

    If you want emotional appeal, listen to Mozart's Don Giovanni or Verdi's La Traviata. If you're just looking for a quick musical high, you've already got that covered.

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  90. The day the music died...

    Drove my Tesla to the levy and couldn't leave because they didn't have a charging station and I wished I still had my 93 Mustang 5.0 blaring Metallica and Queensryche

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  91. I get irritated at folk musicians because the greatest of them are mostly a bunch of unrepentent, dyed-in-the-wool commies, like Pete Seegar. But that's not why I geberally do not enjoy folk music. I just don't particularly like it, for the most part.

    I akso hate hippy politics for pretty much the same reason but I won't let that poison my mind against their music. The thing about the greatest rock groups of the sixties and seventies, like the Beatles, wasn't so much that they were great musucians individually as it was that collectively, they were greater than the sum of their parts.

    That and they were either friends who enjoyed playing together or they literally hated each other, like The Who. Or Ginger Baker and Jack Bruce of Cream who just played off that manic energy. Or they grew up together and were family, like the Kinks, Beach Boys and Van Halen.

    I never compare them to Beethoven and Wagner, etc. That's a different musical concept entirely.

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    1. I actually tried to make a living as a folk musician. I was an idiot. Even though I am a boomer(not my fault) I learned quickly why we are so hated. If you want to win over the crowd at a folk festival, just say something mean about Christians.

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  92. Buddy Holly and the Drifters are as much part of the Boomer canon as the Beatles. When we got home from school, there was Bandstand.

    But, if you want to talk what the late 60s crowd and later did, it was all noise to me.

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  93. Everyone knows Rock Me Amadeus by Falco is the greatest song yet written. On many levels.

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  94. There is decent boomer music, but the reverence for it has always been strange. Like you can say there are nice songs but you can't hear the supposed greatness; it simply isn't there. Ironically enough, I like music made by actual boomers more, like U2 or Rush.

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  95. This video may be appropriate: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNIG6EUqIgs

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  96. That's because none of them are musicians or know anything about music. The average YouTube guitarist is not only a vastly better technician than most stars of Boomer rock, he also knows far more about music theory.

    Technical proficiency doesn't seem to result in original and enjoyable music very often. The musician is *reduced* to the roll of performer but not creator. Like the violinists in the orchestra. Nothing wrong with that. There is a difference between proficiency and creativity and it is important.

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  97. I agree with you to an extent. If you look at tour revenue, the top grossing is peppered with acts/singers over 60. So older generation might not be buying music, but they are buying tickets (and that is where the acts make their money).
    When I was 8 (back in the early 80's), I was listening to my older sister's Michael Jackson-Thriller tape one day....a friend of mine who lived up the road came by and asked me what was this shit I was listening to, to which I responded, this is not shit, this is Michael Jackson! He said, come with me...we went to his house and he played Quiet Riot,Def Leppard, and Iron Maiden...I have been a "metalhead" since that day. As I have gotten older, I have restarted collecting Vinyl ( I know it's a fad and the market will eventually collapse, but that's a whole other topic)...the "hair metal" stuff from the 80's is in high demand, and the prices reflect that. So is old music dying? Yes and no. As far as "new" music goes the main band I follow and buy is Slipknot. The secondary price on their vinyl catalog is insane.
    I think the part that is missing in your post is the peer pressure....I have a 9 year old son, during summer vacation last year he became a Slipknot fan (a maggot), he went as far as making his own mask, setting up a make shift drum kit and pretending he was Jay....summer vacation ends, he goes back to school....after a week at school...he now says Slipknot sucks.

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  98. How is someone who was in the armed forces in 1959 a boomer?
    Honestly, I wish my area had a radio station that would play 50s, 60s and 70s music. My generation (x) never grew tired of listening to 80s music and it has been on the radio non-stop since the 80s. It all sounds the same. The 80s was the worst compared to the 70s, 60s and 50s.
    My local FM "oldies" station was the "hot hits" station in my teen years and they have been playing this shit for 40 years. I even started listening to classic country music just to get away from it.
    But, of course, I would rather be forced to listen to the Beatles or Who than modern music. It's rhythmic log banging. It's awful noise.

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  99. 26. Nate February 04, 2021 9:19 AM
    And don't even get me started on ... ***pukes*** Kiss.


    how dare you impugn ((( Kiss )))?
    .
    what, their one halfway listenable song was disco?

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  100. VD wrote:That's because none of them are musicians or know anything about music. The average YouTube guitarist is not only a vastly better technician than most stars of Boomer rock, he also knows far more about music theory.

    Yeah, no kidding.

    I introduce one such guitarist, Andy James:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOCbKcP5qrs

    Apparently, he just got hired as the new guitarist to Five Finger Death Punch.

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  101. There are the classics and there is the popular. Every generation probably ponders what will happen to its popular music as it fades into obscurity. I don't think boomers are alone in this.

    Vox wrote:I've hated Boomer music for literally decades.

    As late as 2012, you were extolling the virtues of Rock Sugar. Rock Sugar took boomer music to new heights. You certainly seemed to enjoy that.

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  102. "As with anything, the BEST education you get is being self-taught."
    An inquisitive mind. And ignore the noise. js

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  103. Fellas, I have to be honest....I love anti-boomer posts. Any of them. Even the comments are golden.

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  104. I like specific songs because of the memories they bring up (Styx's Rocking the Paradise brings back memories of flying back in to MCAS(H) Tustin from an exercise at 29 Stumps in time for payday weekend, Night Ranger's Goodbye reminds me of my last day in the Corps, etc).

    I don't pretend to have excellent taste in music. I just remember specific moments and the emotions those songs evoke.

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  105. @DannyDanger

    The "good" Boomer music was Brian Wilson and the fun, dumb, garage rock bands that were "good" in the way a hyperactive high school hardcore/punk/metal band is good for just making noise and having fun.

    Keith Moon honestly kind of sucks. He has a lot of personality, but he's trash. Almost all "Classic Rock" drummers are trash. Warped Tour era emo bands had better drummers than what Boomer music passed off as drumming.

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    1. Keith Moon was meant for his band in the way Ringo was for Beatles.
      Not a drummer to be emulated, the Great Keith was a one-off.
      Like Gene Krupa.

      Delete
  106. As a boomer my complaint is with the new insipid church music.
    Does everyone think they are a songwriter?

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    1. Your church music is wrong if it's in English tbh.

      Delete
  107. The Rock & Roll industry rewarded "musicians" based on their ability to Pied Piper their fans into Hellmouth. Frank Zappa, for example, recieved loads of music awards and yet his music was never popular. None of his crap was played by radio stations. It seems he was rewarded for that one iconic Marines-murder-babies schtick he did at a concert. It was central to the communist movement in the USA throughout the Vietnam War. He was known for nothing else.

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  108. All of the big bands from the 60s and 70s were CIA backed, the Beatles being the CIA crown jewel of the 60s for subverting Western culture. Just ask Paul McCartney or Billy, or whatever that guy's name is.

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  109. One of the areas where globohomo lost control is music. That's a good thing. Look at how controlled, and least capable of noticing it, the boomers are. But that was an age of having to take the ticket to "get signed".

    I was a roadie back in the late 80s and early 90s.. more like an in charge sperg roadie that got shit done so I was always kept in arms reach. So I got to be in the room when deals, negotiations, and other such band business was done.
    Club owners are absolute slime, BTW.
    I have known good musicians go nowhere because they didn't have "the look" and that look was determined by various slimy little Jews and probably Italian types who got into their position by snorting coke with the right people.

    Now any artist can distribute their work without have to take a ticket. This was a huge loss of control and a "problem: that globohomo is working to solve. They started with copyright. Censorship is currently on the menu.

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    1. You probably have a number of stories to interest most of us - sadly, perhaps, all the responses to this thread would seem to imply Boomer Music will continue to have good and bad social effects for years to come - But Can I Just Ask You This:

      Do the majority of your experiences concern the commercially-emerging Alternative Rock world, the indie-punk world, or Hard Rock/Hair Metal? That time period seems to have been the last where Music was still important enough to go thru a schism of sorts.

      Delete
  110. I am a trained musician and spent many happy years performing before real, live audiences of real, live people in my community. These performances spanned many musical genres serious and pop. Some were in concert halls; some marching in parade; others in dance halls and barrooms. Quite a few were in the town's band shell in the park. We did this for the audience's listening pleasure, or as background music, and also for dancing. Sometimes we played to ourselves just for the fun of it.

    Before Rock'n'Roll music was about "You," meaning not about "me."

    Pedestalizing? White knighting? Maybe but to a young person in love that's the way it is.

    Many songs were not about people but simple human emotions like joy, sadness, anxiety, longing, and just plain silliness, especially when times were bad.

    Yes of course "me" figured into the before-Boomers songs it was a necessary point of reference, as it "You left me now my heart is broken."

    Boomer music is, well, TRANSACTIONAL: "I can't get no satisfaction" as though the Stones are paying customers at the girlfriend store.

    Yes of course there are many examples of Boomer music that isn't selfishly transactional but I can assure you, having spent too many youthful nights in local dives playing the Boomer book against an equal or greater number of nights playing normal music to broad audiences enjoying swing, polka, salsa, Fifties' pop, Sousa marches and "classical" compositions,

    Boomer music is essentially selfish music.

    So if music is an emotional story told to the audience, what does it mean when the audience is "Me"???

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  111. Nate, fwiw if you have the time I'd like to hear you talk more about Metallica and the theory behind it. I've only recently learned the difference between singing with the melody or singing with the harmony.

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  112. Dylan and Neil Young, possibly more, are selling their song catalogs. They know they will never get more money for them than now. Probably should have sold them sooner. But they know their works will begin the long fade. Time moves on.

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  113. > I think Beethoven and Mozart and Wagner might have a little something to say about that.

    I would have expected you to have Bach in that list.

    > I wonder how someone like Cat Stevens is considered.

    He isn't. He converted to Islam and wouldn't even condemn the fatwa against Salman Rushdie. He deserves to be forgotten.

    > We can separate what we like vs what is The Greatest.

    Bingo. There's a fair amount of boomer music I like. There's a fair amount of 80's music I like. There's some 90's music I like. 2000 on? Not so much so, at least from the commercial scene. I don't think much if any of it is the greatest. It's just what I like.

    > He is a stud because he took the claw hammer playing style from blue grass and applied it to metal bass guitar.

    The best build on the best. That's the way it's always been.

    I have a 64 GB USB drive of music for my car. I'm not dependent on radio stations to play the music I like.

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  114. 48. map February 04, 2021 9:20 AM
    The government probably calculated that the prosperity was not sustainable


    not when your plan is to offshore your manufacturing base, no.



    60. rumpole5 February 04, 2021 9:30 AM
    Talking (and talking and talking) about a bunch of 70 and 80 somethings, Really?


    okay Boomer, at least you managed to figure out a new tactic this time.

    *wink*

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  115. Boomers have always seemed to have retarded musical tastes. Bob Dylan? The Beatles? Who?..the fuck????
    There are songs and artists from Boomer bands that I enjoy, but the emotionally connected music for my youth lies in the late 70s, 80s and early 90s. No, the music of my youth was not the Greatest Ever, and I don't possess the brain-crippling hubris necessary to make such claims against provably better musicianship and compositions created by European classical masters. However, the Boomer G-G-G-Generation is, quite happily, that level of retarded. I love my Boomers. I will miss my Boomers. The rest can go now. We've all suffered enough. Bye.

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  116. 99% of anything mainstream, at least for the past 50 years, sucks. You get some gems here and there but overall the only way to find something decent is to dig past the crust. Thankfully I've never been really felt attached to any particular genre only. I can float between classical to synth wave to something like House of the Rising Sun cause sometimes it's about the emotion evoked by the music. Synth wave/Rock for working out, classical for study or for a calming atmosphere. Just depends. Not everything I like is great technically (but Band-Maid IS). It all depends. But like someone says, I'm not going to sit here and call the 80's/90's the greatest music ever (that will forever remain classical music) because I know not everything is timeless and don't wrap my ego in what I consume. I simply like talent and when it is properly allowed to show case itself.

    To the guy who mentioned Post Modern Jukebox, I thank you. Some great takes on past works.

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  117. It IS a form of hypnotism when they replay the same old tired songs at every turn. You are being conditioned to react to something in a specific way before you even see what that thing is, no matter how deeply aware you are of it.

    When I was younger, I used to think I didn't like music. When I finally got access to the Internet, I learned that I simply didn't like the music on the radio. It was formulaic. There was no genuine spark of originality and creativity in it. It was more like a Saturday Night at the Poetry Club, except 24/7, packaged in 2:42 soundbites because we need to cut to the commercials.

    Fortunately, the Internet makes it easier to circumvent all of that, and I'm all the more thankful for its creation. A lot of highly creative and original musicians would go unheard and unrecognized without it.

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  118. Elvis was not a boomer. Plants grow better listening to classical music. Hard Rock can fry an egg. The military is going to be purged, because they failed to act. The Boomers blew it. Their music won't stand the test of time. The group Queen sums up their legacy. A war is coming. Some music will play on. The media will repeat the Master's lies. It is really 1711, not 2021.

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  119. "It wasn't better technology that made Neal Peart or Eddie Van Halen great, it was creative innovation."

    Yup. And with Eddie it came in the form of both technique AND technology.

    https://nypost.com/2020/10/06/eddie-van-halen-was-guitar-god-and-had-us-patent-to-prove-it/

    https://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/a15615/how-eddie-van-halen-hacks-a-guitar/

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  120. The love for Dylan and the Beatles always baffled me. How many times I’ve heard Dylan as the greatest lyricist ever and the Beatles the best band. Most of Dylan’s lyrics are either complete nonsense or satanic nods to the occult. The Beatles are just overrated. Not even the best band from their own island.

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  121. I'm not convinced that the 'quality' of our favourite music genres is particulary relevent. Apart from being a subjective judgement I believe we associate with the type of music we enjoyed at the most important time of our lives.
    For me that would be mid60s-mid70s because those are the years of growing up, exploring the adult world, discovering the joys of adult relationships, attaining independence and freedom and a certain amount of reaction to the bland, grey post war England of my childhood. The 60s wave of bands were new, young and different, an act of rebellion against the conformist society.
    Yes, kids nowadays can outplay them with ease. The early 'pop' was rough, untidy, unsophisticated etc. But it had a passion and message, and a power that simply does not exist for me in the carefully polished and accomplished pop mainstream today.

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  122. Gregorian chants are pretty cool.
    Ready to die is also pretty nice, definitely something i'll put on a loop when part of a death squad.

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  123. Screw you, VOX. It is great music. He got a little excited over it and added "ist". BOOM, BOOM, BOOM! Get excited over something that matters. Who is this Jordan fellow anyway? PS I quit network television in 1992.

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  124. My boomer father in law is gleefully baffled why all the commercials on TV feature boomer music. He thinks it's because it's great music. We explained that they are the only generation that has money and watches commercials. To no one's surprise here doesn't agree.

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  125. In contrast with "classic" rock, which is dying, the Grand Ol Opry is the longest running radio show in the world, and still going strong. You can listen to it every Saturday night on AM stations around the country, rebroadcast from 650 AM WSM. Country music, with its roots planted deep in a Scottish and Irish heritage, is truly the American music genre.

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  126. “Our time is past......”

    Ok. So you all are going to retire, and give your positions to new people, finally?
    When that day actually comes, I’m sure boomers will hand them over to bisexual, furry “wise latinas,” because the last thing boomers want is another normal white male to succeed them. That’s too much like........being replaced.

    Still, the more the the boomers are replaced by millenial degenerates, the faster the institutions gloriously-crash, and the more whites become red-pilled.

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  127. At the risk of pissing off the Dark Lord, he did have a successful band without being much of a musician.

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  128. What the boomers changed is how old people behaved. Prior to them it was expected that as you aged, you put away "childish things" including "childish music", and moved on to more sophisticated, better music. Old people in the 60s and 70s didn't want to stay 16 and listen to Glenn Miller for the rest of their lives. But now we have 75 y/o boomers going to Rolling stones concerts and "Rockin" to the Beatles. They're proud they're still mental teenagers, telling the "the Man" to go stick it, while they rebel. Sads.

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  129. What the boomers changed is how old people behaved. Prior to them it was expected that as you aged, you put away "childish things" including "childish music", and moved on to more sophisticated, better music. Old people in the 60s and 70s didn't want to stay 16 and listen to Glenn Miller for the rest of their lives. But now we have 75 y/o boomers going to Rolling stones concerts and "Rockin" to the Beatles. They're proud they're still mental teenagers, telling the "the Man" to go stick it, while they rebel. Sads.

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  130. I think there's plenty of great new music out there once you step outside the sphere of Corporate Media.

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  131. She loves you yeah yeah yeah
    She loves you yeah yeah yeah
    She loves you yeah yeah yeah
    And with a love like that
    You know you should be glad

    Greatest lyrics ever penned.

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  132. @132 Wally Bangs. It's also probably the only way they can get out of what has become and maybe always was a never-ending circus act. I think a lot of these people can't get out of it. The Stones, for one example. I don't know who or what they owe but Jagger and Richards reached the end of their shelf lives about the time bassist Bill Wyman walked away. Well before then, actually. The last few Stones tours are about on the same level as the second and third rate bands on the golden oldies circuits.

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  133. One would be tempted to say that this pathetic essay was a descent into self-parody, but boomerism has been self-parody since at least 1969. More importantly, though, is that the essay isn't about music. It's about monumental self-regard and its eventual comeuppance. It's about the author no longing being the celestial north pole for good taste. If you really like a particular genre, why do you give a damn one way or the other if it is or isn't on the radio? A real fan would own all the stuff anyhow. I'm fond of Puccini operas, but I don't expect anyone else to share the taste or cater to them when I'm in a group setting.

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  134. You REALLY want to be up nights in fear? The great Masters were based on composed works that passed the performance test, played by many musicians over decades. That could add nightmares, like Barry Manilow (ptui).

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  135. Hotel California [Shudder]. Tedious, check. Full of shit, check. Yep, it deserves to be the anthem of that generation.
    I could live ten lifetimes never hearing that song again. And die happy ten times.
    May all the trappings of the "my g-g-generation" generation dissipate as they descend into the dustbin.

    I have enjoyed watching the sexual revolution collapse under its own absurdity. Now their mediocre "arts" are getting their just forgets.

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  136. It's not about the music.

    It's about watching the Boomers be confronted with their inevitable and overdue fall into irrelevance, driving them into despair, and hearing the lamentations of them and their "women".

    "What do you mean, 'It's not all about you Boomers anymore'?"

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  137. "Dylan and Neil Young, possibly more, are selling their song catalogs."

    David Crosby is as well.

    Speaking of which:

    https://nypost.com/2020/10/14/david-crosby-sorry-for-meh-response-to-eddie-van-halens-death/

    Love how he brings out Hendrix as the best evah. He might be the quintessential boomer.

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  138. Ominous Cowherd wrote:I'd rather hear Swing or Big Band music than Beatles or Stones.
    Indeed!
    Big Band and Swing have some soul.

    Balkan Yankee wrote:At least there is a half-assed organic quality to Boomer Tunes.
    These days, music is so fxxxing digitally homogenized that it all sounds the same even when it doesn't.

    Try stuff that isn't produced under labels.
    Hell, a couple of years ago some of the My Little Pony fans were producing some excellent original music, and there were some that were remixing/redoing the show's music very well too. (You can find these easily on YouTube.) — Another place to get non record-label music are sites like bandcamp, soundcloud, and so forth.
    And, hey, there's also a lot of good music that makes its way into the openings and endings for anime; I mean, listen to this.

    Unknown wrote:Most boomers are old now. Their winter home in Arizona, their summer home near the former manufacturing plants they allowed to move to Mexico and China with the great jobs they had, their summer cottages in the resort areas, all those homes have grab bars in the shower and the interior doors off to easily use the walker.
    Thanks to the powers of "Reverse Mortgages" and "Narcissism", none of these homes will end up in the hands of Xers, Millennials, or Zoomers.

    theartistformerlyknownasgeorge wrote:Entertainment is always dominated by whoever is currently in the 30-50 year old range because they have money and power.
    Ah, yes; tell me more about the Millennials (oldest are 40 now) and their wide swaths of power in Congress... and their massive accumulations of wealth after 2008/2010/2020.

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  139. I did have an "oh shit, I'm getting old." moment when the local "oldies" station switched to 80's music.

    I am glad there's less of The Beatles being played.

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  140. Boomers will always have their music. Playing on the elevator. Fortunately, I don't ride elevators.

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  141. @ar10308 The sad fact is that, commercially speaking, the only thing Boomers are still good for is fleecing their wealth with targeted products. They especially hate the extremely high priced supplements.


    "There is a difference between proficiency and creativity and it is important."

    My mentor played drums and he worked in Nashville for 15 years as a studio musician while being able to support 2 children. He now works as a factory manager for Coke. He's an amazing player and technically I would put him up against just about anyone you could think of, but he isn't musically creative. So he will never be one of the greats. He's still the best damn drummer I've ever heard, and I have been listening to the talent in Japan which is phenomenal.

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  142. For a second there, I thought VD might actually blow it and take a shot at the single greatest singer/performer of all time. Yes, I'm talking about the man, the myth, the legend....William Shatner.

    This is but one example of his incomprehensible brilliance. Those tears in your eyes? That's from awe. It's ok, you'll be fine.

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  143. >> The Hotel California was pretty much an autobiographical account of Taking The Ticket.

    Same also for"The House of the Rising Sun" which sounds suspiciously like the place in New Orleans which Neon Revolt wrote about in his article "The House on St. Charles Street" which was custom-built for blackmail.

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  144. "I don't pretend to have excellent taste in music. I just remember specific moments and the emotions those songs evoke."

    Literally everyone does this. its human nature. The primary thing is to remember that this is just the nature of music and memory and does not mean the music that you like the best is the greatest music.

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  145. It's funny he tries to take credit for Elvis, who's best music occurred before the oldest Boomer had even hit puberty. The rockabilly from the mid-1950's was breathtakingly wild and fun, which is humorous because all the musicians were from "The Silent Generation". Rockabilly fathered punk music. There are so many similarities. The frantic energy, simple song structure and short song length, 3-piece band arrangement, in-your-face rebellion, distinct sub-culture, etc. The music that birthed rock n' roll is still bad-ass in my opinion.

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  146. Also... Remember... in the 1970s the Kinks literally had a top 40 hit about shemales sodomy.

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  147. 80's synthesizer'd music was unabashedly non-virtuoso and I still loved it as it was formative to me. It's now our turn to melancholically dust off that old Roxette tape on our sunday drive! Step aside, boomers.

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  148. One thing I don't like about the mainstream music now is how it's almost all emblackened, hip-hopified. Ugh.
    Listened to the big local country station first time in a long while, long since conglomerated, and appalled. how even the country music starting to show more of that influence, w way overproduced sings.
    Of course Youtube et al allow greater diversity of music than ever, but just like w cheap ebook publishing there's the curation problem.

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  149. It's not the music. The boomer music reminds them of drug experiences before the law got draconian, easy random sex experiences before sjw nonsense etc... As children they came from good homes into sex, drugs and rocknroll. The wealth of their society allowed them affluence along with their shenanigans. Music takes us back. Ask a boomer what they think about when the music plays. What do you think about? The quality of the memories might affect how great the song is to you.

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  150. For those complaining about "new music" and how it "all sucks":
    1) Turn off your radio. This is the last place that the record companies own. They pay to keep nickelback in constant rotation.
    2) Media Monarchy has a daily dj show. At the end of each year is a 'best of' featuring instrumental, country, everything. About 5% of it ends up on the radio waves. I listen to the six hour shows from 2016 to now as background and I'm always amazed at how much innovation and new styles I hear. Yes Dorothy, DJs still exist.

    Love the love for Claypool. Saw Primus twice in the 90s (the only reason to go to hongkouver). Wonder if concerts are dead now?

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  151. Any post with "Boomer" in the title is guaranteed entertainment.

    Having grown up with Boomer parents, I thought all adults were like them. Imagine my surprise when I realized other people's parents actually took steps for their kids future.

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  152. "There are ten-year-old girls now who play better guitar than the average classic rock guitarist." Maybe, but the way-above-average classic rock guitarists were phenomenally talented and creative.

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  153. I pity anyone who grows up seeing that the music they heard everyday. Back when their parents were young, is no longer heard. Yet they don't realize that the music of their youth will share the same fate. 1950s pop and 1940s big bands. When was the last time anyone ran into that music? The Beatles were just another pop band and Bob Dylan was never good

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  154. Joe Walsh is a better-than-average guitarist.

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  155. DannyDanger wrote:
    I mean...the WHO? Good drummer, but how TF were they even relevant at any point in time?


    Only relevant in providing cool intro music for the various CSI TV series...

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  156. @95

    I learned recently that the opening lick to Billy Idol's "Rebel Yell" was based off of a blues lick Steve Stevens borrowed off of Leo Kottke, and here I thought it was a synth tag.

    Have to admit, New Wave definitely opened things up to a lot of folks.

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  157. basementhomebrewer wrote:I always find it comically when a Boomer heaps scorn on prior generations and then immediately turns around and complains about "Ok, Boomer". That phrase is simultaneously much more tame than the things they said and did, and more cutting because they never imagined criticism would leveled at their generation.
    The reason it's so cutting to them is because it trivializes them; trivialization always cuts deeply into a narcissist and their ego.

    MadMax1861 wrote:This may be true for rock music, but country music has been in decline since 1980.
    I cannot stand modern country music; it's all so terrible, I'd put it on the same level as rap.
    Let's make some shitty County music.

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  158. "there is a big difference between X and the Boomers. We can separate what we like vs what is The Greatest."

    Agreed. I love 80s because that's what I grew up with and it resonnates with me. I make no claims as to its greatness. In fact, I prefer it if other generations see it as a bit odd.

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  159. Early Chicago makes even more sense now with that story. Of course, after Kath blew his brains out and Cetera took over, it went downhill. That's probably the one group that ended up doing the exact opposite through the '80s (I consider those power ballads to be peak Boomer).

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  160. The thing that drives me crazy is that there's all this new music out there that's really good, but NONE of the radio stations will play it!

    It's all play lists and crap. Need to bring back DJ's and let us hear what's new. Sure, there's a lot of old stuff I like, but there's so much new stuff out there that I'm missing out on.

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  161. And here I was hoping that the boomers would help us do something about the fraud administration. But they're just mad. No action. No saving democracy. I was rooting for a redemption arc for them before the end. Maybe that bullshit about shooting people on their lawn was all hot air.

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  162. The Who are way better than Rolling Stones or Kinks, lets be honest. But yes, the Mongolians kick ass.

    Boomers (well, American ones) must be far more annoying than I can imagine. To me (Millennial), theyre just "old people", lmfao. I just don't feel the need to roast them cuz I can't imagine a society where most adults aren't like them.

    Were Greatest and Silents based?

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=34CZjsEI1yU (this sure is)

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  163. "Found the Boomer"...Duh!..And grew up listening to classical, opera, and a little folk...But perhaps because I'm not a trained musician, that didn't eliminate my enjoyment of the simple if it's well done....FWIW, my millennial kids find the Stones and Pink Floyd edgier than anything coming out today...

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