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Thursday, March 25, 2021

The music front

How Western Civilization has been destroyed through Music and the Arts

One of the significant aspects of the current revolutionary madness sweeping the nation is the unrestrained assault on the cultural artifacts of Western Christian civilization. In effect the attack on monuments and the nomenclature of Army forts, schools and streets, and on so much more is emblematic of something more profound and irreparable, an assault on what those symbols signify.

In a broader sense, this assault portends a basic denial of the richness and nourishing fruits of our culture and what that culture has given us. For that denial goes far beyond visible symbols in copper and granite or in place names. We have seen this in the increasing demands for a Taliban-like “cultural cleansing” of our society. And thus the mounting attacks on our artistic heritage—on those works of art that remind us of what our civilization has created and, indeed, of its bounty, goodness and creativity that have helped fashion who we are as a people.

In this climate of nihilism the remarkable art, the superb literature, and the great classical musical heritage which have held us in delighted rapture, are being despoiled, even withdrawn from accessibility like the film classic “Gone With the Wind” (now no longer available via HBO video platforms). In some cases this has resulted in de facto or outright banning. And if a work of our heritage is simply too significant to be erased, then it will be re-cast and reinterpreted to support the revolutionary agenda.

Penalties are now routinely meted out to the guilty defenders of the two millennia of inherited Western culture. Thus, as we watch statues memorializing Confederate heritage destroyed and symbols commemorating Washington, Jefferson, Christopher Columbus, Father Junipero Serra, and others brought down, we also should understand that this vandalism encompasses far more: the abolition of the historic inheritance and rejection of twenty centuries of civilization.

The guardians of our patrimony may utter a mild demurrer, but more commonly, they accede to and go along with this radical transformation of Western culture. It is not as much for fear of being called “racist” or a defender of “male privilege,” rather, too many of our cultural elites are possessed of the same “wokeness” that dominates the streets, if a bit more rarefied.

The effects are particularly dramatic in performance music. Our musical expression gives voice to our joys, our sadness, our triumphs, our beliefs, and how we view ourselves; it is critical to our understanding of the civilization around us. Yet for decades there has been a constant effort to undermine and reshape that expression to fit a progressivist, post-Marxist mold and agenda. A concentration on race and gender is all-consuming. “Anti-racism” and “feminism” have become the benchmarks for this transformation.

Over the past half century and longer progressivists have been largely successful in restructuring what is sometimes termed “higher culture”—an appreciation and understanding of the role in our society of inherited art, literature, music, and architecture—and altering its relationship to most average citizens. When I was a boy, for instance, classical music was programmed regularly and popularly on commercial radio—the major local station at that time in Raleigh, North Carolina, WPTF, featured both the Metropolitan Opera broadcasts on Saturdays and a classical music program every night at 8 p.m. Network television offered us the long-running “Voice of Firestone” and “The Bell Telephone Hour.” Widely-viewed programs like Sunday prime time’s “Ed Sullivan Show” would feature Wagnerian soprano Birgit Nilsson and coloratura Joan Sutherland.

While many of my school chums from sixty years ago didn’t really get into classical music like I did, they at least recognized its significance and resonance in society, that it was an integral part of our inheritance, and that it surrounded and annealed and helped define our culture and made that culture more complete. Maybe they didn’t listen to the Met, but we all knew the themes from those popular TV programs like “The Lone Ranger” (with its use of Rossini’s “William Tell Overture”) or “Sergeant Preston of the Yukon” (with the “Donna Diana Overture,” by Reznicek). And who can forget Elmer Fudd belting out a cartoon version of Richard Wagner—“I killed the Wabbit!”

This is one area where a lot of us Gen-X parents have failed. Too many of us grew up where our Boomer parents filled the music space by leaving the television on, and thereby failed to instill our children with the habit of a classical soundtrack to their lives. The average Gen-X or Millennial probably can't even name their five favorite composers in the way they can readily name their 20 favorite bands.

I was fortunate in this regard with regards to my parents. My mother had one Beatles record, one Beach Boys record, several Bill Cosby comedy records - she had been friends with his wife Camille in college - and a whole collection of various symphony recordings of Beethoven, Bach, Mozart, and Vivaldi. She would also take us to the symphony from time to time, and I eventually developed a taste for Dvorak, Haydn, and Wagner.

But it's never too late to get in the fight. A few years ago, I decided to give Leoš Janáček a try after reading about his work in a Haruki Murakami novel, and while his Sinfonietta leaves me cold, his Complete Piano Works are in the regular rotation, and in fact, are playing on my music system right now.

And on a totally tangential note, this beginning of an interview with Murakami is a hilarious classic.

 “I prepared for my first-ever trip to Japan, this summer, almost entirely by immersing myself in the work of Haruki Murakami. This turned out to be a horrible idea. Under the influence of Murakami, I arrived in Tokyo expecting Barcelona or Paris or Berlin — a cosmopolitan world capital whose straight-talking citizens were fluent not only in English but also in all the nooks and crannies of Western culture: jazz, theater, literature, sitcoms, film noir, opera, rock ’n’ roll.”

I'm wondering how we can use UATV on this front. It occurs to me that if high-quality public domain recordings can be found, or permissions can be obtained, we could create a classical music channel that might be of some utility in this regard.

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115 Comments:

Blogger Opus March 25, 2021 7:06 AM  

I was not when I woke this morning expecting to be reading on this blog of the excellence of Janacek. Janacek's rise from fairly obscure Bohemian to mainstream owes an immeasurable debt to the late Australian conductor Charles Mackeras (Sir) who studied in Czechoslovakia and in the early 1950s persuaded Covent Garden to present Jenufa which was the first time one of Janacek's nine operas (of which I have seen seven!) had been presented in England. The rest as they say is history.

Having said that I saw the Hungarian State Symphony on tour in England in the mid-sixties perform Janacek's Tara Bulba - perhaps that would be more to VD's taste (for which there is clearly no accounting) than the Sinfonietta.

Blogger Doktor Jeep March 25, 2021 7:07 AM  

Really when I compare the works of Bach with typical rap all I hear is the wings of doom flapping.

Blogger Shane Bradman March 25, 2021 7:12 AM  

Preserving classic musical is very important, but keep in mind that the mere fact that it's even called classical musical is a catastrophic failure on our behalf. Why is there a distinction between music of the past and modernist music? The music of the past was not preserved correctly. It was put in a museum where it's now just a novelty that only a select few can appreciate. We've already lost the ability to make music like we used to do. Yes, the previous generations have failed us, but we're failing the future generations if we're not able to create great music for them.

Blogger dow_jones March 25, 2021 7:13 AM  

In the last few years I've greatly increased my classical music input. At this point it claims ~40% of my listening time. My favorite composer is Haydn. My parents never listened to it so I had little exposure growing up. Just started listening to it during a long period of mourning and it stuck with me. My white genes now soak it in like mana.

While listening I've also pondered how the Prometheans will corrupt it. The music is too intricate to converge I think. Trying to create a bastardized version would fall flat on its face. They'll probably just try and bury it. Either that or they'll claim the giants of the genre were Jews even though most were antisemitic.

Blogger millerized March 25, 2021 7:14 AM  

Somehow the satellite radio in the truck finds channel 76 Symphony Hall on trips longer than 30min...and ALL trips are at least 30min.

Blogger bramley bramley bramley March 25, 2021 7:15 AM  

Reading Murakami to understand Japan is like reading Harry Potter to understand England. You'd think perhaps Kenzaburo Oe or even Yukio Mishima might have been a good starting place.

If anybody is ever passing the time in Tokyo and wants to hear some classical music treated with the reverence of a precious historic artifact, pop by the Lion Cafe, itself something of a historic oddity, being one of the oldest buildings still standing in Tokyo. It's an excellent way to spend an afternoon.

Blogger Don Womick March 25, 2021 7:23 AM  

Youtube's one saving grace is that it houses vast quantities of Bach, Mozart, Handel, Haydn, Beethoven, Chopin, Tchaikovsky... and not only them, but also Byrd, Tallis, Josquin, Victoria, Praetorius, Biber, Weiss, Sanz.... on and on.

Blogger CarpeOro March 25, 2021 7:29 AM  

My parents (I think mainly my mother) had no impact on my musical tastes. All I can remember from childhood are Roger Whitaker and Barbra Streisand - neither of which held any attraction. They did encourage me to play an instrument (coronet, then baritone horn). That was how I was introduced to at least the concept of classical music even if the school band didn't play much. Oh, I also remember going to the juke box in the Italian restaurant we frequented and playing the William Tell Overture as my selection. Bugs Bunny also had impact as it was my favorite cartoon.

Blogger Philippe March 25, 2021 7:32 AM  

Music is always a hard topic to talk about around me. When I point out ugly paintings or buildings, "people" (aka white people) don't seem too shocked.

For music, somehow they reply "everybody has their own taste" eventhough it is pure noise.

Blogger JovianStorm March 25, 2021 7:35 AM  

Japan is 100% Japanese and that's the highest compliment we can give ourselves. Murakami is just one of many good writers but English and Japanese don't play well together.


Watching weeaboos who idolize the cultural output without understanding anything behind it is pretty funny. But watching those same weeaboos know nothing about their own rich , Western heritage is just a tragedy.

Blogger Harambe March 25, 2021 7:42 AM  

They're drawing dicks on our heritage and daring us to do anything about it

Blogger Red Bane March 25, 2021 7:44 AM  

I have had an appreciation for classical music since me teenage years, even while in throws of trash metal. After an academic attacked classical music as being insufferably white, I took greater interest and now only listen to it on the car radio.

We have resurrected Gregorian chant and Polyphony in our Church also in the last 2 years. We are getting good, and I am a musical retard when it comes to theory. If I can do it, so an you. I feel this is a huge front on the cultural battle field and get a thrill of pleasure from knowing that academics across the land hate what we are doing.

I am also part of the 'Trad Cat' movement, restoring the proper place of traditional liturgy and praxis in Holy Mother Church. This too offends the sensibilities of the Boomers (and the diocese) in our parish, who hang on to the doorframes of their 'New Ordo' Mass while our Traditional liturgy attracts all the families and youth. There is literally just a handful of them remaining. We will be rid of them soon enough. The front lines of these wars are fun. I recommend joining the fight.

Blogger Stilicho March 25, 2021 8:25 AM  

In effect the attack on monuments and the nomenclature of Army forts, schools and streets, and on so much more is emblematic of something more profound and irreparable, an assault on what those symbols signify.

The attackers are animals who are incapable of creating anything of value and, therefore, seek to destroy anything of value thewy find in fits of rage and envy.

Blogger Jake March 25, 2021 8:28 AM  

Just for fun, I entered the search phrase, "Was Bach anti-Semitic," and was not surprised to find a number of results, including at the Canadian Broadcast System. To quote them, But as beautiful as his music is, the texts of some of Bach's masterpieces are tinged with the anti-Semitism of the time."

Hilarious.

Blogger Ominous Cowherd March 25, 2021 8:29 AM  

My mother had a number of swing and big band hits on 45s. My father was tone deaf, so we also had records with things like Gilbert and Sullivan operettas, because he could enjoy those despite the music. The only classical music we got at home came from the Soviet shortwave stations. I still like the stuff I grew up with, and classical music does sound better without the static and interference.

Blogger James Dixon March 25, 2021 8:29 AM  

> It occurs to me that if high-quality public domain recordings can be found,

https://library.osu.edu/site/publicdomain/2020/07/27/when-does-music-enter-the-public-domain-in-the-united-states/

The short version is that only works from 1925 and earlier are guaranteed to be public domain. That and "high quality recordings" don't tend to go hand in hand.

Now, the compositions themselves are in the public domain. So anyone can perform them, record the result, and place the recording in the public domain voluntarily.

> But watching those same weeaboos know nothing about their own rich , Western heritage is just a tragedy.

Celebrating Japanese culture makes you an oddity. Celebrating our culture makes you someone to be destroyed.

Blogger Ominous Cowherd March 25, 2021 8:31 AM  

Red Bane wrote:We have resurrected Gregorian chant and Polyphony in our Church also in the last 2 years. We are getting good, and I am a musical retard when it comes to theory. If I can do it, so an you.
On one project we had a manager who would deliver his morning briefings in Gregorian chant style. It was very pleasant to listen to.

Many of the traditions from Rome are good.

Blogger SciVo March 25, 2021 8:31 AM  

We are being treated like every conquered people since the beginning of time. The simplest explanation is that we are one.

Blogger Honkler the Emotional Wreck March 25, 2021 8:32 AM  

Even in popular music, they try to rewrite history as if Jazz and Blues was created by "African-Americans." These genres were created by Creole and employ exclusively European tonality, musical phrasing etc. African-Americanism is totally made up.

Blogger Sean Carnegie March 25, 2021 8:34 AM  

You mean chicks aren’t routinely hiking up skirts to find exits on highways? Fantastic book.

What if you did historical shows on composers? “This is Bach and here are five (excerpts?) of his greatest works.” Start with ones everyone should know, or knows their name but not music, and head into comparatively obscure: Samuel Barber et al.

Blogger megabar March 25, 2021 8:43 AM  

I've always known in my gut that modern art (e.g. a canvas with a cucumber taped to it) was wrong and damaging, but only in the past few years have I understood why. I used to argue with others and struggle to articulate why we shouldn't have museums filled with silliness.

Blogger theartistformerlyknownasgeorge March 25, 2021 8:44 AM  

The public radio stations in New England always had some great music during the 10 years or so I lived there during the 90's (Classical, Jazz, Celtic, ect.). There was even a Saturday morning show that introduced folks to the sort of greatest hits of various eras and composers. I also could find a classical concert to see on almost any given weekend: anything from small ensembles in a church to full orchestras at a special event. Often they were free or very inexpensive.

That same era was also a great time for things like Michael Hedges and George Winston, but I wonder if folks have the patience for anything that builds slowly in music.

Blogger Swamp Fox March 25, 2021 8:44 AM  

This. And even if they did know something about Western heritage, they would trash it and tear it down. Or allow outsiders to do it for them.

Blogger Swamp Fox March 25, 2021 8:47 AM  

This. And even if they did know something about Western heritage, they would trash it and tear it down. Or allow outsiders to do it for them.

Blogger Big Bob March 25, 2021 9:00 AM  

I was watching one of Big Bear's livestreams some time ago and he started explaining how music can be written to be in harmony with God's natural order or it could be written to create discord. He used Pachelbel's Canon in D and compared it to Ravel's Bolero along with other music. I actually got a bit emotional because I realized that none of the music teachers in the private Christian schools I attended ever explained that concept in such a clear way. I would have loved to see him continue to expound on music theory as it relates to God's creation. Perhaps Owen could be convinced to make some kind of music education video for UATV.

Blogger RobertDWood March 25, 2021 9:00 AM  

The DFW market benefits from WRR, an all classical all the time FM station. That's usually on the radio when we are driving somewhere as a family. I hope something sticks in the little ones we are raising.

UATV has the academic tours, a course on classical music would be splendid, in particular for homeschool application. I have a 30 greatest orchestral works from The Great Courses that is acceptable, but the professor teaching is a lefty dweeb and they are all limited in length so they only have highlights of the symphonies.

Still, I discovered Mendohlseon through this course and that is a blessing of God.

Blogger Newscaper312 March 25, 2021 9:07 AM  

I love a lot of Classical music in the narrower sense. On my death bed I would ideally listen to Beethovens 9th by John Eliot Gardiner, followed by Richard Strauss' Death and Transfiguration.

But for working as a programmer I usually prefer instrumental Baroque: Bach, Telemann etc. Keeps that part of the brain stimulated without distracting by being too overtly emotional. Similarly some Cool Jazz works too.

Speaking of musical heritage, insane how blacks, who have something to be proud of in their major to Jazz and Blues, but most are completely ignorant of them now in favor of thumping mutha fugga muh n!gga "music".
Its a subset of whites and bizarrely japanese who keep them alive.

Blogger Ariadne Umbrella March 25, 2021 9:07 AM  

Dad was Boomer, but had a music degree. So I very personally hate the soundtrack of my adolescence.

Having said that, the lesser Soviets on the Dalmatic coastline all have excellent orchestras. They tend to be technically excellent, and they sell their work cheap. It's why the "buy 1000 classical tracks" on mp3 players use their recordings. You would be keeping Slovenians and Slavonians, whomever else is over there, in cigarettes and food, if you bought their talents.

There are young church musicians studying things like organ, the big pipe ones. There are young composers coming out of ?I'm not sure where, the coastal conservatories. They scramble in Hollywood. I was at a wedding where the mother of the bride asked a young conservatory musician to play. Fully neurotic kid, but great music that he had composed himself. Then she asked for recognizable pop hits. Wedding in Cana has nothing on how this kid went off on his mom.

The major church colleges have young, photogenic musicians. St Olaf's, for instance. They compose some interesting church music. Like, Baywatch lifeguard physicality, not 'great personality." Purely shallowly, I'd watch videos of Ken and Barbie making awesome music.

It's a big deal. If you could make that, you could have an entire radio- classical old, classical new, movie style classical (sweeping emo romantic) You could interpolate the warhorses and the new, like a regular rock radio station.

Just, please, run it like a regular rock station. The station here has a lecture about every piece, every time. I'd rather have it run like a rock station- a rotation of regular songs that change over the course of a year interspersed with the new up and coming songs. Then trust I'll get curious enough to go look up the musicians, name of the song, and so on. I can learn Nirvana has a lead singer named Kurt Cobain. I can learn this song has a composer named something Bach. For that matter, don't be afraid to mix in earlier more famous Bachs, with later Bachs (yes, the current bel canto Sebastian)

Kpop videos have Yiruma moving from classical to his classical to pop in one piece. The audience and the other musicians are familiar with all the pieces. There's one with a Kpop young star and Yiruma, where they go all over the music map.

There isn't an artificial break, except the Baby Boom, and the group that defaces Western Civ really did try to counterfeit with remarkably ugly pieces that somehow still make it to radio. Other than that, all the musicians are in the same vernacular, and it all works in a mix quite well.

The Wellerman group song on TikTok had professional musicians pitching in. On their own channels, they had really great music. They had the range, too,from classic to pop to rock.

There are just tons of musicians out there with amazing talents. The Wellerman Tiktok thing demonstrated how much hunger there is for good music of any type.

Blogger Newscaper312 March 25, 2021 9:08 AM  

Re Baroque how could I leave Handel off that list.

Blogger Newscaper312 March 25, 2021 9:11 AM  

@3 Shane Bradman
Re "classical" music, its not quite fossilized, yet.
Yes academic music departments have lost their way down the intentionally discordant unlistenable modern rabbithole, but in the meantime it has survived in movie soundtracks, although Im not sure how much longer. John Williams, James Horner, John Barrie, w a side of Hans Zimmer, etc.

Blogger Newscaper312 March 25, 2021 9:14 AM  

@12 Red Bane
Nothing finishes a Mass like the organist letting it rip at the recessional. Manly, joyful, powerful music that gets the blood pumping, not the muffled too slow funeral home crap.

Blogger Bernard Korzeniewicz March 25, 2021 9:15 AM  

SDL!
Please start the classic music radio for UATV subscribers.
That is really good idea. I like BB, but can't listen to him for 2h.
I can listen to Bach for days.

Blogger Frosty the Bear March 25, 2021 9:20 AM  

I like the music channel idea, I would utilize it.

Blogger RobbyIlluminknotty March 25, 2021 9:28 AM  

As a parallel, my experience studying at a prestigious school of architecture in NYC during the 1970s was that any attempt at neo-classical architecture was strictly forbidden. The reaction from every instructor was always "No! You can't do that" followed by an explanation of how you had to work in your own time period. To add weight to their rejection neo-classical architecture, they associated it with Nazis and Fascists, describing it as a mental disorder. In retrospect, it was all very Maoist.

Blogger Mario Josipovic March 25, 2021 9:29 AM  

@12 When I sent my oldest two children to a local private school for Grade Seven, they came home saying "Hey Daddy, we learned about those Gregorian chants we sing at Mass on Sunday".

I agree the rot isn't just in our public school system. Most Catholic churches have, for the past 50 years now, abandoned the rich cultural heritage of Holy Mother Church. As you're likely experiencing, it doesn't take much to restore it. Gregorian chant is very easy to learn and can be slipped into any Novus Ordo liturgy without much fuss. There's a holiness - a "set-apartness" - that permeates a Mass once it's there. You start to yearn to be "set apart" with Him for that hour on Sunday and it inspires you the rest of the week.

Glad to hear your parish has restored that.



Blogger Mario Josipovic March 25, 2021 9:34 AM  

@12 When I sent my oldest two children to a local private school for Grade Seven, they came home saying "Hey Daddy, we learned about those Gregorian chants we sing at Mass on Sunday".

I agree the rot isn't just in our public school system. Most Catholic churches have, for the past 50 years now, abandoned the rich cultural heritage of Holy Mother Church. As you're likely experiencing, it doesn't take much to restore it. Gregorian chant is very easy to learn and can be slipped into any Novus Ordo liturgy without much fuss. There's a holiness - a "set-apartness" - that permeates a Mass once it's there. You start to yearn to be "set apart" with Him for that hour on Sunday and it inspires you the rest of the week.

Glad to hear your parish has restored that.



Blogger Bigger Bunyip March 25, 2021 9:37 AM  

I enjoy Bach Organ music played on huge pipes from European churches. Even though a recording isn't the same as the whole body vibration of being there, and digitizing and compressing for youtube further robs it of essential quality, some of the magic and the grounding still survives.

Good headphones, which are much cheaper these days, even good bluetooth ones, offer music possibilities not there back in the day.

Blogger Doom March 25, 2021 9:38 AM  

Doktor Jeep wrote:Really when I compare the works of Bach with typical rap all I hear is the wings of doom flapping.



Thanks. But I have actually played Bach. To an actual audience. :p Had to laugh.

Blogger RamboBearRon March 25, 2021 9:41 AM  

I wonder if our vast community of people could take over or start anew a project like LibraVox that creates free audiobooks of the western cannon. I'm listening to the Odessy on my commute and can't help but think people like us take this mantle and increase the quality and availability tenfold.

Blogger sammibandit March 25, 2021 9:45 AM  

I grew up listening to German music/military hymns. I don't know if any are public property. It's beautiful and optimistic music. We weren't allowed to listen to Wagner, for whatever reason.

When I got older I got into my own music but I still regularly listen to German military hymns/leids.

Blogger Hylean March 25, 2021 9:48 AM  

I thoroughly support a public music channel. I'm told of mini, that is a subscription service with arthouse and classic movies available, and they rotate out their selection monthly. Its half letting it ride, half careful curation

Blogger Leo Littlebook ID:16216229492837658552 March 25, 2021 9:50 AM  

My Pandora/Pianobar plays some classical occasionally, but only that which can compete with the modern music that comprises the majority. Beyond the dubious curation of mainstream distribution channels, the river of talent spreads into a mighty ocean. Pendulum's "Still Grey" follows Ludovico Einaudi's "Come Un Fiore".

I feel no urge whatsoever to pursue genre-specific enrichment.

Blogger BoomerHater1 March 25, 2021 9:51 AM  

"Russia and China are now, obviously, in the "coercion to peace" mode relative to the United States, which is a euphemism for control of the implosion process of the United States and mitigation of all risks associated with that, the US unleashing a global war in desperation being the most important one;”

http://smoothiex12.blogspot.com/2021/03/whats-trending.html

Blogger BoomerHater1 March 25, 2021 9:52 AM  

"Russia and China are now, obviously, in the "coercion to peace" mode relative to the United States, which is a euphemism for control of the implosion process of the United States and mitigation of all risks associated with that, the US unleashing a global war in desperation being the most important one;”

http://smoothiex12.blogspot.com/2021/03/whats-trending.html

Blogger James Dixon March 25, 2021 9:52 AM  

> in favor of thumping mutha fugga muh n!gga "music".

Rap, hip hop, et.al. aren't music. They're poetry set to music.

Blogger Glen Sprigg March 25, 2021 9:56 AM  

Newscaper312 wrote:@12 Red Bane

Nothing finishes a Mass like the organist letting it rip at the recessional. Manly, joyful, powerful music that gets the blood pumping, not the muffled too slow funeral home crap.


I agree. I loved blasting out pieces like 'O God Beyond All Praising' (to the tune of Holst's Jupiter), 'How Great Thou Art'. and 'Lift High the Cross' at the end of Mass. 'Immaculate Mary' is a nice song, but it's not a recessional hymn.

Blogger Brett baker March 25, 2021 9:59 AM  

+1

Blogger Balam March 25, 2021 10:01 AM  

''In effect the attack on monuments and the nomenclature of Army forts, schools and streets, and on so much more is emblematic of something more profound and irreparable, an assault on what those symbols signify.''

This statement made me realize more leftist hypocrisy and spite . To a leftist the symbol IS the thing; it's why they catalogue 'microaggressions', language as oppression and breaking down gendered restrooms. Whenever a leftie says 'its just a X man, not a big deal' I now know that it is a lie. To the leftist the open restroom or 'Xir' instead of sir IS meaningful to them.

Secondly when they attack these symbols, since the symbol is the thing to their satanic sorcerous minds, they are directly attacking God and the truths revealed by Him. Some gristle to get my guard up more in the face of these ''hey man it's not a big deal'' arguments.

Blogger Jason the Gentleman March 25, 2021 10:03 AM  

For what it's worth, I would totally listen to the classical music channel as filtered and chosen by yourself. I've listened to a great deal of classical, but it was all self-selection based largely on looney tunes and hearsay about general composers. I've no idea what the actual pieces are called or which ones are best.
For instance, 'That really sweeping piece that wraps you up in it and then lets you back down,' is how I try to describe my favorite one that Beethoven does....just had to go do some internet sleuthing to discover I am referring to Symphony No. 5, Op. 67: I. Allegro con brio.

Blogger Black Robed Cleric March 25, 2021 10:04 AM  

While I haven't soaked my boys in classical music, I have instilled in them an appreciation of at least types of folk music. The younger has even inherited my true love of western music (not country, just western). He's learning the guitar and wants to play Marty Robbins songs. He was practicing Worried Man Blues the other day.

Blogger Shane Bradman March 25, 2021 10:04 AM  

@30. Newscaper, John Williams very blatantly copies Holst and Wagner, which is not what I'd call creating new music. He had a moment of genius with Harry Potter, which is far and away his greatest achievement. Indiana Jones was alright too. Hans Zimmer is a good composer. Across the sea, Joe Hisaishi is a good composer. I like Thomas Newman although I wish he would take more risks in music as a lot of the time he plays it very safe and it sounds all the same.
While there are a few good film composers hanging around, that's only one type of music that follows the symphonic and operatic legacy. It's usually not difficult for musicians to play film scores, and so the excellence of the musician is not pushed. No concertos to challenge skilled musicians and forcing them to practice to be able to play it correctly.
The one genre I can think of that has any kind of following that does this is math rock, which is extremely technical and theory based. That's just for the standard rock instruments like guitar, bass and drumkit. If there are any musicians, start playing math violin or math trumpet, or find a friend and make a math duet.

Blogger Brett baker March 25, 2021 10:04 AM  

If you have DISH network, it has the Metropolitan Opera channel.

Blogger LES March 25, 2021 10:06 AM  


How Should We Then Live?


Dr. Schaeffers’s work from the mid 1970’s is still relevant. Although it is on YouTube it is a little difficult to watch the episodes in order.
I recently bought the DVD. He puts emphasis on the arts and music. There also is his book by the same name.


"This is Dr. Francis Schaeffer's spectacular series on the rise and decline of Western culture from a Christian perspective. The series presents profound truths in simple language and concludes that man's only hope is a return to God's Biblical absolute -- the Truth revealed in Christ through the Scriptures. Each 30-minute episode focuses on a significant era of history while presenting answers to modern problems:

The Roman Age
The Middle Ages
The Renaissance
The Reformation
The Revolutionary Age
The Scientific Age
The Age of Non-reason
The Age of Fragmentation
The Age of Personal Peace & Affluence
Final Choices"

Blogger K. March 25, 2021 10:11 AM  

What's the best Murakami novel to start with?

I've been putting his work off because the guy who recommended him to me the most is a textbook gamma but Vox seems to love him.

Blogger Irish Energy March 25, 2021 10:14 AM  

I wrote a couple of songs during the lockdown that are as good as the Beatles or David Bowie at their best but I have no intention to whore myself in front of the usual music industry dimwits. When I was younger I was in a band and we did all that and I never want to go back. So I've only played the songs to a few friends who liked them. One of which, who is sympathetic to wokism, remarked that I couldn't have written them but were unable to say where I got them from. I take that as good feedback.

Classical music is great but we need new artists who will grab a hold of the modern culture and take it over by sheer force of will and creativity. Most of the main cultural figures from the 60s are now dead. The future is happening now.

Blogger Ron Winkleheimer March 25, 2021 10:18 AM  

Really when I compare the works of Bach with typical rap all I hear is the wings of doom flapping.

The one thing I agree with Louis Farrakhan about is that rap music is a plot by the CIA to degrade the youth, he thinks it was just supposed to degrade the black youth but the cultural vandals knew it would spread beyond that.

Blogger Opus March 25, 2021 10:30 AM  

It remains to be seen how much damage has been done to classical music by the lockdowns which I have no confidence will end any time soon. I fear that it will be the nail in the coffin of serious music (as we used to call it) at least as it has developed since the earliest public concerts (London's Argyle Rooms in the 1690s).

Had there been no Covid-19 I would still have been concerned. In England there is the BBC which amongst its myriad functions is the commissioning each year of some one hundred and twenty new pieces of music. The BBC is not just the greatest provider of new music anywhere but the greatest in recorded history. Unfortunately in the last ten years or so the criteria for a commission is no longer ones perceived ability. The BBC must now ensure that for every commission given to a man one is given to a woman. This is not so difficult as men are discouraged from entering the conservatoires and so the up and coming composers are just as likely to be women as men. The problem is that as with Chess and everything else the bell curve of intelligence predicts that for every decent female composer there will be thirty men - and that pretty much was the commissioning ratio generally pre-millenium. One judges from performance to ability and even a cursory view of musical history shows that women just do not and never have cut it. Apologists for women composers, usually on the grounds of nasty men, not only thus undermine their own equalist ideology but fly in the face of the realities of musical history and human nature. What the BBC is doing is thus deliberately selecting the fifth rate. A similar metric applies to the non-english. You may be white but if you can demonstrate that you are in some way 'other' (even e.g. Welsh or better still Polish- like that bird who was given the last night of the Proms last year) your box can be ticked. Best of all of course if you are Muslim or black or better still both. There presently is a young mulatto cellist who is lauded non-stop and for all I know he may be the Lewis Hamilton of the Cello but you know that were he anything less he would still be promoted by reason of his skin colour. He has a pianist sister and the same lauding applies to her. Finally: being Homosexual or Lesbian is preferred but that has never been a problem as in England the term musical has long been a synonym for effeminate.

Japan: does anyone share my liking for Koji Suzuki's books: Ring, Spiral, Birthday? Does anyone share my enthusiasm for Sumo: Kakurya and out of the blue retired, yesterday. I am gutted.

Blogger Azimus March 25, 2021 10:39 AM  

My wife usually pumps classical music through the house in the winter, which as you know in Wisconsin is 6 months long. That is, when she's not listening to talk radio. So my kids go through the house humming Vivaldi's Spring or something by Mozart - I have a video of my daughter doing "air piano" (f. of "air guitar") to the Turkish March - at least until the windows open for summer.

Blogger Enjcj March 25, 2021 10:45 AM  

Trad Cat is the future just as it was and is the past. Our parish attracts young families, including mine. Alot in their twenties are eager EAGER to have large families. The Great books series has courses on classical music and it's composers. I have an audible account and have a lot of books I want to listen to so I can get an introduction to all this. Even it it may be converged on some points you've got to start somewhere. I find that when I read blogs that promote western civilization there are lamentations about nobody knowing or caring about the history and culture, but when asked for resouces to learn more not many or none are given. So if you're looking to start understanding classical music the Great Books Courses on audible seem like a good place.

Blogger Haddone March 25, 2021 10:45 AM  

I'm wondering how we can use UATV on this front. It occurs to me that if high-quality public domain recordings can be found, or permissions can be obtained, we could create a classical music channel that might be of some utility in this regard.

--That would be awesome! a clean, upbuilding music channel.

Blogger Ostar March 25, 2021 10:49 AM  

The Los Angeles area has ONE classical music radio station left on air and that only because it is licensed through the university of USC not “commercially” : KUSC. Worth listening to online because no commercial breaks and they still play bad think artists, and no political diatribes masquerading as musical commentary (yet).

Blogger ChewbacaTW March 25, 2021 10:50 AM  

One of the great things about this space is all the great ideas. I would love a classical music channel on UATV!

Blogger Matthew March 25, 2021 10:53 AM  

I have recently become enthusiastic about Wagner after watching Excalibur. He may have dethroned Bach as my favorite composer.

Blogger Barbarossa March 25, 2021 10:55 AM  

The demise of orchestral music, opera and ballet in our culture cannot be pinned on the modern SJW. Those wounds were self-inflicted. That John Cage could actually get 4'33" "performed" in 1952 by a supposedly reputable orchestra tells you all you need to know about the state of the classical music business even 70 years ago. For those of you unaware, 4'33" had the musicians simply sit on stage not playing for 4 minutes and 33 seconds.

Ditto for opera. Since Puccini's death over 100 years ago, there hasn't been a single opera that has resonated with the public. Not one. Try sitting through Wozzeck. I dare you. Yeah, they'll try to push some Philip Glass garbage at you, but the audience isn't fooled. The public also noticed that the major opera houses started playing tricks with their subscription series. Just try to get one of the mini-packages without having a modern piece attached. Orchestras would do the same thing by sticking the modern achromatic nightmare piece between the Mozart and Beethoven works, knowing that the usual audience member wasn't going to walk out after the first and return for the third. Instead, the audience just stopped showing up.

This topic has bothered me for many years, and I time it to a seminar of sorts I participated in during college. A group of composers were invited to have their works performed over a weekend by a group of us college musicians (note: I was not a music major). Most of the composers would give a bit of background on the work. This one cat got up and told us how he had based his piece on a Fibonacci sequence that he had somehow transposed into notes. Beyond dreadful, and I realized then that most of these composers weren't actually trying to create music. They weren't trying to channel the voice of God. They were simply masturbating to the idea that someone would write a breathless review acclaiming them as great creative geniuses.

Blogger TechieDude March 25, 2021 10:55 AM  

The kids schools here cured us of the classical music problem. Kids have to take so many credits of fine arts. You can join the Choral, Band, or Orchestra.

My oldest took voice for a year then switched to art. The other two carried on through high school. My son played Cello, the daughter plays Clarinet and is now a masters of music. Along the way, we got nearly constant exposure to classical music, through concerts and performances.

FWIW, when I'm at a performance and I see on the program that the composer is of the 20th century, I grown. Worse if they are still alive. Then what happens is the conductor explains what the piece is about because you clearly won't get it listening to it.

After the play it you're like "WTF WAS THAT!".

Then they'd finish with something like Brahms and I'd tell ask my kids why couldnt' the whole show have been that? Why did they do that (modern composer) to us?

Blogger Barbarossa March 25, 2021 11:15 AM  

As an aside, I don't include the excellent Porgy & Bess because Gershwin's wish that it be performed by a black-only cast limits its staging possibilities. It also means you get wildly uneven quality of performance, given the relative shortage of operatic talent for such a large cast. Maybe we can start stipulating a white-only Die Walkure. Curious if any of our European brethren have seen it live on stage.

Blogger Shane Bradman March 25, 2021 11:25 AM  

@56. Listen to Farrahkan and Tariq Nasheed and you'll find that you have more in common with them than you do with Mr "Whitey" Conservative.

Blogger Unknown March 25, 2021 11:27 AM  

I study with Richard Cionco, who was a student of Rudolf Firkusny, who was a student of Leos Janacek. The synchronicity is God winking at me. I would love to concertize for the bears, the VFM, or whomever in our circle would like to hear great music.

Blogger Ahărôwn March 25, 2021 11:28 AM  

Toronto is blessed with an 24 hour, all-classical music station - Classical 96.3 FM, which I'm able to tune into from where I live. They also have a website where you can listen live (commercials and all): http://classicalfm.ca

One could also create a Soundcloud account - there's lots of great music there. Of course, streaming takes up a lot of internet bandwidth.

I grew up with a lot of classical - as traditional Pentecostals, most music wasn't considered appropriate to listen to, and Christian radio wasn't really a thing yet. A couple of years ago I rediscovered my dad's LP collection, and got a turntable to listen to his 30-odd classical records - a real treat.

Blogger Watchu talkin bout Willis March 25, 2021 11:40 AM  

Not an expert on Classical, Baroque, etc., but judging from the Bach I've listened to, it is objectively obvious he had more talent in one pinky finger than all today's rappers/hip hoppers/ combined.

Blogger Crush Limbraw March 25, 2021 11:40 AM  

Ron W - you might agree with Louis Farrakhan a lot more than just on music. As was everyone else, my impression of LF came from the usual sources, until...
..I started DaLimbraw Library.
If you type in his name in the search window at DLL, there are about half dozen articles from several sources which reveal why we're lied to - and who's lying.
BTW - since I didn't see a link - the article which Vox excerpted was written by Boyd Cathey at Lew Rockwell.

Blogger Phelps March 25, 2021 11:43 AM  

Barbarossa wrote:
Orchestras would do the same thing by sticking the modern achromatic nightmare piece between the Mozart and Beethoven works, knowing that the usual audience member wasn't going to walk out after the first and return for the third. Instead, the audience just stopped showing up.


I'm astonished that my orneriness never compelled me to do this. I'm glad you broke the programming. The next time they pull that shit at the symphony, the wife and I agreed that we will just stay out in the lobby enjoying a bottle of wine. If anyone asks, we will tell them explicitly that we don't listen to that awful shit, and we will go back in when they are ready to play good music.

One of these travesties had a plastic recorder in it. Another had a damned train whistle. A wooden dime shop train whistle, that someone who is trained to blast out Hyden's Creation had to put his lips on a blow like it was real music.

Blogger mh01701@gmail.com March 25, 2021 11:54 AM  

I also mourn the loss of local music styles. Where there's regional variations and traditional tune preferences. Scots Irish in the Appalachians, French Canadian tempo in Northern New England. Friend of mine moved to Southern Virginia from New Hampshire and was horrified to find every county has a different set of tunes they played for jams. Instead of a few dozen tunes to learn there were hundreds. Too funny.

Blogger Raker_T March 25, 2021 12:04 PM  

FWIW I used to listen to public radio for the classical music. But at a certain point, abruptly, they made a format change. About 8 or 10 years ago I guess. After that everything was DCK; Dreary, Screechy, or Kooky. Seriously. You can tell when it's fundraising time, that's the ONLY time they'll play anything appealing, and God forbid you should want to hear anything so low brow as a Sousa March. They went out of their way to turn people away from classical music.
OTOH, I rented a car maybe 5 years ago, drove out of state, listened to (XM?) satellite radio. They had at least 2 classic channels. One was called Pops. I listened to that most of the way. I think a station with appealing music would create it's own audience.

Blogger MichaelJMaier March 25, 2021 12:14 PM  

James Dixon wrote:> in favor of thumping mutha fugga muh n!gga "music".

Rap, hip hop, et.al. aren't music. They're poetry set to music.


Rhyming "Primatine Mist" is "poetry"?

Blogger VD March 25, 2021 12:33 PM  

After spending all of 10 minutes looking into it, a Classical streaming channel on UATV might well be possible. We'll put it on the list of future features.

Blogger Legacy16 March 25, 2021 12:34 PM  

Amen to that. Rap music is the worst offender for destroying American culture... and now it's even making strides into baseball game playlists. Ugh. My kids get a good dose of classical (including good movie soundtracks), worship music, country/folk, and jazz. No rap or pop allowed in our household.

I do have a soft spot for the Sinfonietta, as my high school wind ensemble performed an adaptation of that back in 1988. It was a great experience. But Mahler and Dvorak rule the roost.

Blogger Barbarossa March 25, 2021 12:42 PM  

@72 I walked out of Ghosts of Versailles (free tickets) and got in an ugly argument with my girlfriend in the lobby over it. The critics had told her it was a "tour de force" so what right did I have to say it was godawful? Never mind individual discernment. Never mind the innate sense that God provides us to recognize beauty.

Blogger Lee March 25, 2021 12:45 PM  

"Too many of us grew up where our Boomer parents filled the music space by leaving the television on, and thereby failed to instill our children with the habit of a classical soundtrack to their lives."

Too true! And a problem that has only grown exponentially from having three fuzzy stations to everyone staring at their pocket TV's all the time.

I think the invention of the TV, and its rocketing advancement to where now literally anyone can create their own channel, has more to do with the breakdown of society and culture than any other one thing.

Blogger Barbarossa March 25, 2021 12:46 PM  

@74 Vox, I don't know if there's anything a lowly reader can do to assist you with this project or if I even have the skills to be anything other than an impediment, but this idea is truly important.

Blogger Opus March 25, 2021 12:50 PM  

@Barbarosa

I don't want to start a fight but it is simply not correct that no opera has entered the repertory since the death of Puccini (which he having died in 1924 is not yet as you aver over one hundred years ago). Where I am, all these post Puccini operas are now standard repertory: Janacek (mentioned by VD) The Makropoulos Case - From the House of the Dead: Berg - Lulu: Martinu - Julietta: Britten - Peter Grimes - Billy Budd - The Turn of the Screw - Death in Venice: Tippett - A Midsummer Marriage - King Priam. There may be others.

You ask also whether any Europeans (I suppose that includes me) have seen Die Walkure. Yes indeed and more than once and at both of London's opera houses. All white indeed almost entirely British (i.e. white) casts - the only foreigner being the late Peter Hoffman (with the blond rock star looks and flowing hair to match as Siegmund) at Covent Garden. In opera, black singers seem to me to work best when they are playing mythological characters.

You rightly mention the problem of staging Porgy and Bess. Either one sacks ones chorus and imports black people or one blacks up. The same problem affects Delius' Koanga. I have seen it done with an all black chorus and frankly the use of black singers does not aid authenticity any more than Star Trek would be made more realistic if the actors were real astronauts. Opera is a western art form - Italian invention from the Florentine Camerata of the 1590s - and requires white singers. It is after all artifice and not real life and requires a suspension of belief. The proof of this is that Puccini's Butterfly which requires an all yellow female chorus is always done with the white middle-aged women of the chorus pretending to be Japanese. No one objects. No one objects either that in say your favoured Puccini opera Turandot not one of the cast is Chinese. I once saw Butterfly with Yasuko Hayashi as Cio Cio San but the fact of her being Japanese not only did not make the opera more realistic but really gets in the way. You can't ignore what you are supposed to be ignoring.

Blogger Unknown March 25, 2021 12:54 PM  

ill upgrade to silver for some classical music channels

Blogger VD March 25, 2021 1:14 PM  

I think the invention of the TV, and its rocketing advancement to where now literally anyone can create their own channel, has more to do with the breakdown of society and culture than any other one thing.

No. 1965 Naturalization Act. No question.

Blogger Gen. Kong March 25, 2021 1:36 PM  

James Dixon wrote:

> It occurs to me that if high-quality public domain recordings can be found,

https://library.osu.edu/site/publicdomain/2020/07/27/when-does-music-enter-the-public-domain-in-the-united-states/

The short version is that only works from 1925 and earlier are guaranteed to be public domain. That and "high quality recordings" don't tend to go hand in hand.

Now, the compositions themselves are in the public domain. So anyone can perform them, record the result, and place the recording in the public domain voluntarily.


You need to read down further on that osu chart (which is a decent guide, btw). Thanks to Orrin Hatch, the Repuke party and even Trump (who dutifully signed the abomination), zero sound recordings are free until January 1, 2022 in USSA. On New Year's day 2022, recordings published in 1922 and before are free. Recordings published 1923-46 are locked up 100 years from publication, those published 1947-56 for 115 years, those from 1957-Feb.15 1972 locked up until 2067. It does not matter of the music recorded was Aaron Copland (most under copyright) or J.S. Bach (public domain). With recordings, the sound-recording copyright exists separately from any copyright in a musical work. In typical swamp fashion, the pre-1972 recordings were not actually brought under the Federal copyright law directly but they were magically deemed to enjoy a performance right under the Hatch law, even though the actual copyright in such recordings technically remains under state laws.

In short, the best way to have the actual audio for the great works is to produce new recordings to be released under a creative commons or similar license. Otherwise you get to pay the MLC, made up entirely of (((music industry))) types headquartered (of course) in NYC. The MLC makes zero differentiation between a recording of a work in the public domain (Bach) and one of a work under copyright (Copland published after 1925). Outside the US things are not nearly as bad. In the EUSSR, recordings fixed before Nov. 1, 1963 are public domain. In Switzerland the term is 50 years from fixation, much the same in a number of Asian countries.

The copyright in the EUSSR in the musical works is life plus 70 years of the last surviving author. This means if a UATV classical channel were in EUSSR, even works by composers such as Bartok (died 1945) or Richard Strauss (died 1949) and son Prokofiev (died 1953) would not be subject to payments.

Blogger Gen. Kong March 25, 2021 1:52 PM  

@65.

With all due respect, I disagree.

Listen here

Blogger Barbarossa March 25, 2021 2:00 PM  

@81 Note that I didn't say "enter the repertoire." I said "resonated with the public." Obviously, tastes vary but "in the repertoire" these days is hardly the same as popular. Not terribly dissimilar to the games we see played with movie reviews, no? To pick an example, I'd say Lulu is in the repertoire this days for the same reason Wozzeck is. Critics have convinced enough people that Berg is an important composer, so you can always sucker a few people into seeing it because "art." And we can argue all day, but you'll never convince anyone that Billy Budd evokes the same passion for the art form as Turandot. As far as Britten, my favorite is Albert Herring.

And please excuse my awkward precedents. I meant to ask if Europeans had seen P&B live, not Walkure.

Very good points about casting. And I have seen it cut both ways. Saw an "Aida" where the heroine was a black lady shaped liked a beach ball. The fact that she did have the appropriate Ethiopian shading and sang the part reasonably well could not overcome the fact that no one in the audience was convinced that any Radames ever born in an infinite number of universes would give up everything for that. The audience actually gasped when she first came out on stage.

But thank you for commenting. I rarely get to discuss opera with anyone these days.

Blogger Unknown March 25, 2021 2:11 PM  

I don't know anything about the legal side, but piano is my passion. I would love to play Haydn Sonatas, Beethoven Sonatas, Chopin Waltzes, Debussy, whatever I'm working on, with the bears. I'd love to share tips that my teacher gives me on improving technique, sight-reading, and theory. That would be mutually beneficial for all of us. I could spread knowledge while simultaneously improving my own teaching. Very nice thought. In the meantime I will keep crushing. This is what I'm working on this month:

Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 9 in E major, Op. 14, No. 1
Chopin: Waltz in E Minor (Op. Posth)
Debussy: Arabesque No. 1

Blogger Peabody March 25, 2021 2:18 PM  

One church service really opened my daughter's eyes. Instead of the "worship band" they had an organist playing the big pipe organ.

She'd never heard people sing that enthusiastically before.

I told her, this was every church service when I was your age, and she told me she felt cheated.

Still makes me smile.

Blogger RobertDWood March 25, 2021 2:20 PM  

I had a similar experience reading some of the Malcolm X material last summer, he's not a friend to the progressive at all.

Blogger RobertDWood March 25, 2021 2:25 PM  

Recommended reading that will help sharpen your perception on television: Amusing Ourselves to Death by Neil Postman.
Television isn't a problem because of the product. It's a problem because of the consumption.

Blogger M In The 517 March 25, 2021 2:50 PM  

Anyone ever use this?

https://onlinesequencer.net/

Blogger stevo March 25, 2021 2:53 PM  

I've never been a classical music fan. I do recognize that this is my loss, and perhaps someday I will make an effort to appreciate it. I think that in some ways Metal is the closest today's music gets to classical.

Blogger VFM #0168 March 25, 2021 2:54 PM  

I recommend reading The God Who is There by Francis Schaeffer. He tackles this very subject starting first with philosophy and working its way through music and art and then into theology. He did this in the 1960s and much of what he wrote would sound like he was writing it today.

Blogger Bezzle March 25, 2021 3:06 PM  

Not quite sure how today's music trawl started with the Leżajsk pipe-organ and ended up with Rusty McHugh at the Flora-Bama, but I'm glad it did.

Blogger idprism March 25, 2021 3:08 PM  

When I was in a club in college, we had a Library for members. If you checked out a cassette, nobody knew whether you had copied it or not. Later, the library included a set of hard drives which you could check out and consume (or pilfer) the content.

If you're doing pub domain anyway, perhaps a download counter for DDL(direct download) for HQ versions that decays over time (you get 2 HD downloads this month with your subscription tier) and a stream for LQ versions?

How long before the music snobs tell you you picked the wrong performance? :)

Blogger JonM March 25, 2021 4:21 PM  

A place to go for curated classical music would be a Godsend.
As it stands, that cultural ground was ceded to the new broken algorithms or...*shudder*...NPR.

Blogger Newscaper312 March 25, 2021 5:18 PM  

When I was in middle school in the late 70s our parish was blessed with a new younger priest, prob in his 39s at the time, who was very old school with the music. He kicked the folky guitar strummers to the Saturday evening Mass, and for the main Sunday morning Mass, which the head pastor performed, he'd often boot the regular organist and let it rip. He had the opinion that if you went old school proud hymns, loud, and livelier tempo on the pipe organ more people would sing along, enjoying themselves more and less self conscious, versus the common notion if soft pedaling the music so as not to drown out the barely singing congregation.
Damned if he wasn't right on all counts.
He even built a harpsichord from a kit he would sometimes 0lay.
God bless him, Father Gorman.
Could use a few no nonsense men like him now.

Blogger Dafo March 25, 2021 5:43 PM  

You’d be amazed how easy it is to find a cheap stereo and classical cds. I just picked up a still-like-new Aiwa and unopened set of 100 classical CDs from Bach to Vivaldi for a whopping total of $27. So I splurged and got an aiwa sub for 30 and now I feel like I’m right in the concert hall. Kids love it, too. Exactly what Vox said about creating a soundtrack in the house, it’s so nice.

Blogger bramley bramley bramley March 25, 2021 7:46 PM  

@92
I think that in some ways Metal is the closest today's music gets to classical.

It's definitely the most European popular music going, though they're trying to black it up and get more woman singers (who are always cringe and awful). But as a concert-goer of both metal and classical over the years, i can say that even the loudest, heaviest metal band has nothing on the 200 person choir i heard at the Royal Festival Hall. Un-amplified acoustic energy with enough power to shave your hair off. It was an experience i will never forget.

Anonymous Anonymous March 25, 2021 8:00 PM  

I stopped at a red light last year. I'm in a convertible. Whatever noise that thumped from the vehicle in front of me (or behind, or beside, I couldn't tell, that's how loud and stereophonic it was), and it literally drove me mad. It was maddening that I couldn't escape it, it was maddening that it was so awful and infuriating that I was being forced to hear it and almost painful. I don't know if it was dubstep or wave or some new type of 'music'.

Being an captive audience was intended. That's how they get you to notice them. They force it on you. Otherwise you'd be able to avoid them like dogshit in the street.

Anonymous Anonymous March 25, 2021 8:08 PM  

Now that I brought up my story, I am also reminded of G. Gordon Liddy's "Will", his autobiography. While in prison he used to force his enemies in the joint to listen to him sing Teutonic songs. In the shower, in the cell, wherever.

He was forcing his, erm, his will on others in order to anger, to cause fear and alarm because they couldn't understand German and they couldn't get him to shut up (it was tried, but he wore a ring that was sharpened to a point to cut up the face and body of his opponents, so after a few scrapes they left him alone).

There are other like stories in his book and it can be entertaining.

Anonymous Anonymous March 25, 2021 8:24 PM  

@64

Thanks. I thought I was the only one who remembered reading about that travesty.
The bulk of (((Phillip Glass's))) hackwork e.g. Einstein on the Beach is a close second to that nonsense, maybe in a tie with (((György Ligeti's))) "Aventures".

Glass's score for Kundun was OK though.

I grew up on classical music, so if you haven't it's difficult to learn to like it. I gravitated to Beethoven and Elgar and Russian composers like Rimsky-Korsakov from my father's vinyl albums. My father usually played Mozart and other chamber music from the radio in the house when he was home (and Sinatra at night). Chamber music is flabby and always bored me.

Blogger Ariadne Umbrella March 25, 2021 9:09 PM  

If the channel started with already recorded music, it could be successful enough to support new musicians. If it were broken down into per shares, or something, there are fully trained church musicians scraping by all over the place. They have their compositions. They have the compositions that they learned.

You could have artists go between styles, to pump up both styles. There's a K-pop star recruited from ?Toronto? by a Kpop label. He had just won a piano competition. The record executives offered him ten thousand screaming teenage girl fans. The artist is good in both genres, and his fans are comfortable in both classical, modern classical and pop.

The Midwestern Lutheran musicians all seem to be cartoonishly good-looking. I mean, if you want videos.

There is innovative Christian music. I don't know that it all makes it to the radio. The fun stuff seemed to be on cassettes, back when cassettes were a thing.

Rap? That's been gatekeepered on the radio. The on the ground stuff is innovative, creative and interesting. The record labels have very entrepeneurial guys running them. It's not just JayZ mumbling stupid drug stuff. The better ones come up from records from their grandparents- they were raised by their grandparents, and their grandparents had records of swing and jazz and such.

For that matter, the big bands? Regular people did not suddenly dislike them. The elites decided to tax big bands by either the player or the instrument. It became prohibitively expensive to book a big band. The elites, of course, kept their big bands and dance lessons and debut balls for themselves. Nasty, covetous jealous types. But: Peter Duchin and Frank Sinatra played deb balls through, like, until they died. You could have a mid-century channel, and it would possibly do well. Stray Cats make a living.

Blogger Bryan March 26, 2021 12:16 AM  

The average Gen-X or Millennial probably can't even name their five favorite composers in the way they can readily name their 20 favorite bands.

As a Millennial I can relate all too well to this. Sure, I liked hearing classical music here or there, but couldn't bother playing anything around the house beyond The Nutcracker each Christmas. Fortunately I came to my senses last year when I realized that the classical station was the only one playing *consistently* acceptable music when traveling with the kids. So we left it on that.

Unfortunately I'm a bit far from the station and reception isn't the best in spots. Then I found Primephonic, an all-classical streaming service (works on web or phone app). I'm no true aficionado, but they've had everything I've ever needed, down to the specific recording. I'm exploring the Janacek Piano Works for the first time as I type this, so thanks for that. I've already queued up a few more recommendations from the comments as well. They have curators who tend to pick the right recordings, you can build custom radio stations, and you will eventually get half-decent recommendations from their algorithm. So, there's value-add over simply searching and streaming classical pieces from YT. Not very many signs of convergence, either (certainly in comparison to YT).

Anyway, now music from great composers are filling our home each day. We've been able to pick a "Composer of the Month" at home school and really go deep with it. My kids are quite onto Grieg. I have fallen in love with Symphony No. 3 by Saint-Saens (whom we picked for CoM due to Carnival of the Animals). All of this to say, it's been a game-changer and I would recommend it to other homeschoolers or folks without a good local station or established collection. Until UATV gets something going, it might be worth looking into. Hopefully this isn't afoul of blog rules, but you can get two months free with my referral link (an upgrade from the default two weeks): https://account.primephonic.com/ref/2109516816826259760773

Blogger Matt #0083 March 26, 2021 12:43 AM  

@4 It's been done, about a century ago. They corrupted it by mathematizing it, which sucked all the good, true, and beautiful out and left us with a sterile wasteland in art music for 50 years, but a lot of employment for left-brained left-wing music theory and composition professors. Hmm... Arnold Schoenberg... early life... Every. Single. Time.

I once told my Wind Literature prof that Stravinsky's 'Symphonies of Wind Instruments' is a marvelous and interesting deconstruction of music... but it's not actually music. It's kind of like when the gastropub takes things a little too far and serves you a big toasted crouton in a skillet drizzled with broth, with caramelized onions and a little cheese melted over it, and calls it French onion soup.

Film soundtracks were the last refuge of beautiful art music between the world wars, and it largely died even there after the 40s, until John Williams almost singlehandedly resuscitated the orchestral soundtrack with Jaws and Star Wars. Unoriginal copycat he may be, but he was copying the best of Western civilization in a venue which put it in front of the vast majority of the population again. And really, back in the day the classical composers were all ripping each other off constantly anyway, so I have my doubts exactly how valid that particular criticism is.

@85 I think the widespread success of traditional orchestral film soundtracks in the late 70s and early 80s was a large part of the impetus behind the Neo-Romantic movement in art music that really got rolling in the 90s. Lauridsen's two "big hits" - 'O magnum mysterium' and 'Les chansons des Roses' - date from 1993 and 1994, and I've never heard much of his earlier work performed. Lauridsen on the West Coast is the exception to a general rule - I think you'll find that the Midwest and some other parts of the world have maintained a certain tradition of tuneful music in the church, if nowhere else: the choral tradition in the midwestern US (largely Scandinavian in origin) is much different from the globohomo-dominated choral tradition of the coastal regions, and in the US large numbers of homos come with a certain political inclination baked right in, which tends to be opposed to traditional beautiful music and everything else that is beautiful. Someone up the thread mentioned St. Olaf's, one of the great university choirs. Rene Clausen who was at Concordia College for many years often writes very beautiful music even when he is consciously trying to be experimental. And John Rutter's music, mostly written for the Anglican church, can be a little bit bubble-gum sometimes but is certainly very tuneful and approachable. The best of it is very nice; I'm fond of his Gloria for brass, percussion, organ, and choir which dates to 1974. It was written for a Midwestern US choir. Many of his choral anthems, psalm settings, and original Christmas carols are beautiful and uplifting.

The new venue for interesting art music in the classical tradition is video game soundtracks. Baldur's Gate was an early example. A lot of the Halo music was published in concert band and orchestral arrangements aimed at high school musicians who would be familiar with it from the games. Skyrim's music is beautiful and Julie Giroux, a modern band composer, has written band works based on it. More recently I particularly enjoy the original Destiny soundtrack.

Blogger the other boomer March 26, 2021 1:55 AM  

The music one listens to really effects one's mind and spirit. This is a great thread, and a great idea.

The only living concert-hall type classical composer I like is Arvo Part, but the choir director at one or the other Episcopal churches in town said we are in a golden age of choral music. In an Episcopal service you may hear anything from Gregorian Chant to English Renaissance to present-day compositions, and it might not always be easy to guess which of the latter two was which.

I downloaded good, recent, free recordings of Dowland's Lachrimae pavans a few years ago, but they don't seem to be where I remembered finding them. If we set our minds to it a lot of usable material could surely be found.

If I understand correctly in the EU compositions are under copyright for 70 years after the death of the composer, but performances only 70 years after the performance. Then you could use recordings from 1950 and before. There are recordings worth listening to in that time frame. Furtwangler conducting the Berlin Philharmonic in 1943 or so may be the all time best recording of Beethoven's 5th.

Blogger MidnightSun March 26, 2021 2:51 AM  

I was exposed to Classical at and early age from Boston Symphony and Boston Pops. At university took a course which consisted of locking oneself in a padded room with headset and blasting Wagner Beethoven Bach Brahms etc., for six hours weekly.
My son to this day still pipes Classical throughout his home therefore exposing his two toddler sons to the same.
I would welcome a classical stream if UATV were to pursue this beautiful art form which seems to be lost on many in today's environment of (designed)brain rot rap and other unbearable genres.

Blogger Opus March 26, 2021 6:59 AM  

@Barbarosa

It too has been a pleasure for me to discuss opera with you.

May I add, as I have been thinking about it overnight that:

1. I have actually seen Valkyrie at least four times: at least twice in the Byam Shaw production and once in the Pountney's aborted Ring at the Coly and once the Gotz Friedrich at the Garden.

2. I have never seen Porgy and Bess and for the reason you mention. A few years back they did do it at the Coly but of course had to import a black chorus and lay off their own. The same as I said for Koanga (Sadlers Wells- where it was presented by an all black ad-hoc company - a very strange operatic evening half of the audience being black and the remainder elderly Delians - and me).

3. I absolutely take your point about Aida. I once saw Rosenkavalier at the Coly with Sandra Browne as Sophie von Faninal. Browne is black. Sophie is supposed to be the daughter of the richest man in Vienna in Nineteen or is it Eighteen Hundred. oh purrrleese. I have however seen Grace Bumbry as Salome (The Garden) and Jessye Norman (The Met) as Ariadne and Sir Willard White (who is very black) (Amsterdam's Stopera) as the emperor in Oranges and they all work very well. I have also seen Yasuko Hayashi who is Japanese in Butterfly (The Garden). One is supposed in her authenticity to not notice that Cio Cio San really is Japanese but of course you cannot forget for one second what you are supposed to ignore.

4. Finally although I am fairly indifferent to Phillip Glass and grow weary of John Adams, I recently much enjoyed your Nico Muhly's Marnie (which has been done in the same production at the Coly and The Met). Using its original 1950s English setting and 50s British idioms struck me, however, as odd. Having said that and to judge against the highest standards I just think as to what, say, Janacek would have done with Marnie - or even Puccini.

Blogger Ariadne Umbrella March 26, 2021 8:32 AM  

OH, right: high school band and orchestra teachers. Poor as, well, teachers. They write music. They write operas. They write beautiful classical music. They write accessible classical music. Quite a few of them are children of musicians, too. The local choir teachers, her daughter is on the cover of worldwide serious music magazines. The parents are both musical teachers. They are more talented than the daughter, in her way.

For that matter- the current piano competitions. You'll have Asians by the bucket: and, well, buckets full of anything are inexpensive-ish, in general. And, well, you want more young people listening.

Music has been gatekeepered by the usual suspects for about a century. It's not naturally grotesque. People on the ground might not make technically finished in a studio music, but they do make amazingly beautiful, good music. MTV had a very specific viewpoint. After they were established, within a few years, they could finance their videos and shows. It's not a natural combination, the one they mixed up.

Blogger Mamabear37 March 26, 2021 12:53 PM  

top 5 composers you say? Challenge accepted: Bach, Brahms, Salieri, Vivaldi, Liszt, not necessarily in that order.

Blogger Zed, Lord of the Brutals March 26, 2021 2:15 PM  

No one seems to have mentioned Grieg yet. More contemporary, I enjoy the work of Basil Poledouris and stemming from that, the soundtrack to Age of Conan. Video games seem to be the refuge of decent music, as in so many other ways.

Blogger Mamabear37 March 26, 2021 5:59 PM  

@Zed, Yasunori Mitsuda is a favorite.

Blogger Prof. Spudd March 26, 2021 10:05 PM  

The demise of orchestral music, opera and ballet in our culture cannot be pinned on the modern SJW. Those wounds were self-inflicted. That John Cage could actually get 4'33" "performed" in 1952 by a supposedly reputable orchestra tells you all you need to know about the state of the classical music business even 70 years ago. For those of you unaware, 4'33" had the musicians simply sit on stage not playing for 4 minutes and 33 seconds.

@Barbarossa
Actually, you have to go back to (((Arnold Schoenberg))) as the culprit who stuck the knife into Western classical music.

Blogger Reader March 26, 2021 10:38 PM  

I just returned from the evening walk. If I go alone, I will put on the earbuds and listen to the classical station, Berliner, on Amazon music. Whenever Vivaldi's Four Seasons, Spring, is played I will switch over to the album (1987 London Philharmonic) and listen to the whole thing. It is absolutely divine, with some passages bringing tears to my eyes, and giving me goosebumps. I would listen to The Four Seasons every evening but our neurons will eventually get tired of even the most beautiful things, demanding different stimuli. It's a darn shame, too.

This evening's walk was to delight in the Creation. The moon, almost full, very bright, casting my moon shadow as I went along. The trees everywhere in bloom. A very slight breeze, 69 degrees. And Vivaldi's Four Seasons. There are some things too beautiful and grand that even the hateful destroyers can never touch. Thank God.

Blogger Ariadne Umbrella March 27, 2021 1:18 AM  

Eistentodtsfastwhatever Welsh? singers.

Eisteddfod..........Welsh singers, male, big voices, insanely great. I had to look up how to spell it.

There are local, national competitions modeled on this. You want obscure and national? You can get obscure and national.

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